John 8:15 Ye judge after the flesh;

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

You condemn the physical. I will not decide anything.

KJV : 

Jhn 8:15 Ye judge after the flesh; I judge no man.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The words translated as "judge" and "after" here are "krino" and "kata." In Greek, the word translated in the bible as "condemn" is katakrino. Literally, the phrase means something like "to distinguish down" like we might say, "to put down." The idea is negative.

Christ uses the word translated as "flesh" to refer to the physical world, the material world. Just a little before this, John had Christ cautioning people about judging by appearances, Jhn 7:24. This is a continuation of the same idea.

The verb form of the final "to judge" is most commonly used in the future tense. Christ is not saying what he does judge, but what he will judge in the future.

While it is forbidden in English, the double negative works in Greek. The final phrase in this verse translates directly as 'I don't judge nothing." As it does in poor English, the double negative emphasizes the central message. The word is translated as "no man" in the KJV, but the word means "nothingness" in a very general way.

Wordplay: 

The word translated in the bible as "condemn" is katakrino. The words translated as "judge" and "after" here are "krino" and "kata." So in Greek there is a double meaning: "judging based on the physical" and "condemning the physical." 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὑμεῖς "You" is from hymeis, which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

κατὰ "After" is from kata (kata), which means "downwards", "down from", "down into", "against", "down toward", "opposite", "separately", "individually", "at a time", "towards", "in accordance with", "concerning", "corresponding with", "during the course of a period," and "severally."

τὴν σάρκα "The flesh" is from sarx (sarx), which means "flesh", "the body", "fleshy", "the pulp of fruit", "meat," and "the physical and natural order of things" (opposite of the spiritual or supernatural).

κρίνετε, (2nd pl pres ind act) "Judge" is from krino, which primarily means "to separate", "to put asunder," and "to distinguish." It has a lot of other secondary meanings, including "to pick out", "to choose", "to decide" disputes or accounts, "to win" a battle, "to judge" especially in the sense of "estimate", "to expound," or "to interpret" in a particular way.

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

οὐ "No" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

κρίνω (1st sg fut ind act ) "Judge" is from krino, which primarily means "to separate", "to put asunder," and "to distinguish." It has a lot of other secondary meanings, including "to pick out", "to choose", "to decide" disputes or accounts, "to win" a battle, "to judge" especially in the sense of "estimate", "to expound," or "to interpret" in a particular way.

οὐδένα "No man" is from oudeis, (oudeis) which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."