John 20:27 ...Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands;

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Bring that finger of yours here and see this hand of mine. And bring that hand of yours and toss into this side of mine and  don't become distrusting but trusting.

KJV : 

John 20:27 ...Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Perhaps one of the last proofs of Jesus's good humor. These words could only be said in a lighthearted way. Notice again how repetitious they are. In this case, they repeat what Thomas had said earlier, but the form itself is very repetitious, as are all of Jesus's words in John after the resurrection.

Reach: The word translated as "reach" means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch." It is the base of a lot of words Christ uses commonly, including the words that mean "bring together", "bring to," and "bring through." Its use is more like our use of the word "get."   It is in the form of a command.

hither: "Hither" is from a pronoun that means "what is present" or "here it is".

thy: The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun.

finger: "Finger" is from another uncommon (for Christ) Gree word that means "fingers", "toes", "the thumb" "an inch," and "a digit."

and: The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

behold: The word translated as "behold" means primarily "to see" and is used to mean "know' as we use the word "see" to mean "know" in English.   It is in the form of a command.

my: "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

hands: The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control.  It has an article so "the hands" or "these hands."

and  The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

reach: The word translated as "reach" means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch." It is the base of a lot of words Christ uses commonly, including the words that mean "bring together", "bring to," and "bring through." Its use is more like our use of the word "get."   It is in the form of a command.

hither: There is no "hither" here in the Greek.

thy: The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun.

hand:  The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control. 

and:  The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

thrust: The word translated as "thrust" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." It is a word that Jesus uses humorously, but here it was used first by Thomas.   It is in the form of a command.

it: There is no "it" in the Greek.

into: The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

my: "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

side: "Side" is a unique Greek word for Jesus to speak. It means "ribs," and "side."  It is used for many of the same meanings of "side" in English. It  also is first used by Thomas. 

and: The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

be: The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Jesus, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.  It is in the form of a command.

not: The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.

faithless: The Greek word translated as "faithless" means literally "no faith," or "no trust" but it meant "not to be trusted" and "mistrustful." We would say "distrusting." It is from the same root as the word "trust" below.

but: The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

believing: The word translated as "faithful" means "trusting" and "trustworthy." 

Wordplay: 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

 Φέρε  ( verb 2nd sg pres imperat act ) "Bring" is from pherô, which means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch."  -- 

τὸν δάκτυλόν [uncommon](noun sg masc acc)  "Fingers" is from daktylos, which means "finger", "thumb", "toes," a measure of length, "finger's breadth," "date," and "a kind of grape."

σου (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your."  --

ὧδε (pron) "Hither" is hode, the demonstrative pronoun which means "this" in the sense of "what is present" and "what can be seen." With verbs of action and with a person, it means "here" as in "here I am" in the sense of "I am present." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ἴδε ( verb 2nd sg aor imperat act ) "Behold" is oida which is a form of eido, (eido) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know." --

τὰς χεῖράς (noun pl fem acc) "Hands" is cheir (cheir) which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful." -- 

μου, (noun sg masc gen) "My" is emou, which means "me", and "mine". --  

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

φέρε ( verb 2nd sg pres imperat act ) "Reach" is from pherô, which means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch."  -- 

τὴν χεῖρά ( noun sg fem acc) "Hand" is cheir (cheir) which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful." --

σου (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your."  --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

βάλε ( verb 2nd sg aor imperat act ) "Thrust" is ballo, which means "to throw", "to let fall," "to cast," "to put", "to pour", "to place money on deposit", "push forward or in front [of animals]", "to shed", "to place", "to pay,"to throw [of dice,]" "to be lucky", "to fall", "to lay as foundation", "to begin to form", "to dash oneself with water," and "to bathe." --

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὴν πλευράν [unique]( noun sg fem acc ) "Side" is pleura, which means "rib," and "side." 

μου, (noun sg masc gen) "My" is emou, which means "me", and "mine". --  

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. --

γίνου ( verb 2nd sg pres imperat mp ) "Be" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", of things "to be produced," of events "take place", "come to pass", "to be engaged in", math "to be multiplied into", "become one of", "turn into".and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state. --

ἄπιστος ( adj sg masc nom ) "Faithless" is apistos, which means "not to be trusted" "mistrustful", "incredulous," disobedient, "disloyal," or "suspicious."

ἀλλὰ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." --

πιστός. ( adj sg masc nom ) "Faithful" is pistos means "believing", "trustful", "obedient," "genuine", "deserving belief", "credible", "unmistakable", "believing", "relying on", "obedient", and "loyal." -- 

Front Page Date: 

May 10 2019