Luke 19:26 ...That unto every one which hath shall be given;

KJV Verse: 

Luke 19:26  For I say unto you, That unto every one which hath shall be given; and from him that hath not, even that he hath shall be taken away from him.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

I tell you the fact that to every one, the one having, it is going to be given. From, however, the one not wanting to have also this he has is going to be lifted away.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There are four similar verses so far in the Gospels. All but one used the negatives of opening or desire with the "not having" part of the verse so the sense is that those not having don't think they have or don't want to have. In the case of this story, the last man certainly doesn't want the responsibility of having and because of that, also didn't think he had the responsibility.

The Greek word translated as "for" doesn't exist in the Greek source we use today.

The word translated as "I say " is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak."

 The Greek pronoun "unto you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause. It is often transalted as "because" and "the fact is that".

  The word translated as "unto every one" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything" or "everyone". Here it is an indicated object to the "unto" is added.

The word translated as "the which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

The word translated as "hath " means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and . The form is an adjective, "having", with the article before the sense is "the one having".

The verb translated as "shall be given;" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." The form is the future passive, "it is going to be given".

There is no "and" here in the Greek. The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

The word translated as "him that " is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The word translated as "hath " means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and . Again, this verb is in the form of an adjective, "the one having".

The negative "not" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.

The Greek word translated as "even" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). An "also" might capture its sense better than the "even", which has a different connotation in English.

The word translated as "that " is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.  Here "this" might word better to distinguish this word from the other different "that" words in this verse.

The word translated as "he hath" means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and . Its form here is active with the previous "that" being its object.

"Shall be taken away" is one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," and "to cause to cease."Christ uses this verb to refer to what will happen to "the son of man," which can apply either to his being raised from the dead or lifted up on the cross.

This final "from him" phrase is added and doesn't exist in the Greek. The "from him" comes early in the verse and is not repeated.

Greek Vocabulary: 

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is lego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command."

ὑμῖν  (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

παντὶ ( adj sg masc dat ) "Unto every one" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

τῷ (article sg masc dat) "that which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. --

ἔχοντι ( part sg pres act masc dat ) "Hath" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

δοθήσεται ( verb 3rd sg fut ind pass ) "Shall be given" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." --

ἀπὸ (prep) "From" is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

δὲ (conj) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

τοῦ (article sg masc get) "him that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. --

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἔχοντος ( part sg pres act masc gen) "Hath" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "Even" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

  ( pron sg neut acc) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. 

ἔχει ( verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) "He hath" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ἀρθήσεται. ( verb 3rd sg fut ind pass ) "Shall be taken away" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for." --

Wordplay: 

Related Verses: 

Nov 19 2018