Luke 21:6 As for these things which ye behold, the days will come

KJV Verse: 

Luke 21:6 As for these things which ye behold, the days will come, in the which there shall not be left one stone upon another, that shall not be thrown down.

 

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

These things that you are gazing at? They are going to start, times in which none shall be left a stone upon a stone as it is that won't be broken down.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The verb translated a "torn down" here is only used by Jesus in this verse and it parallels and in another verse referring to the law, saying that he did not come to tear the law down. However, stones are an analogy for bread which is analogy to the law, so it is interesting. A few interesting changes from the versions in Matthew and Mark. However, all verses use the word translated as "leave" in an usual way. Here, the translators add and subtract words in completely unnecessary ways.

"As for" does not exist in the Greek.

The "these things " is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. Its form is neutral plural, which is where the "things" comes from..

The word translated as "which " is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

The Greek verb translated as "ye behold, " is not as simple as "see." It is not one of the common words Christ uses for seeing and being seen as is used in Mark and Matthew. It is a more specific word that has more of a sense of gazing at something as a spectator. It originally meant watching an oracle. It also means "seeing something in your mind".  This word appears mostly in John, but a couple of times here in Luke as well.

The Greek word translated as "day" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime." There is no "the" before days, but the article is more common before the plural in English than Greek.

The word translated as "will come, " primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas.  Here, start works. The verb is in the future tense.

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

The word translated as "the which" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

The word translated as "there shall...be left" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament. It is also translated in the NT as "leave" but the sense of being "left undisturbed" is almost the opposite of the word's meaning which is to "leave" in the sense of departing or getting rid of something. Very strange unless unless there is a play on words here.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

There is no "one" here. 

The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones. Stones are used in parallel with "bread" as an analogue for the law.

The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

The Greek word translated as "another" here is also the word for "a stone",  the same as used above. This same change is made in the translation of the other versions of this verse in Mark and Matthew.

There is an untranslated word here in the Greek source we use today that means "here" or "as it is". This word did not appear in the Greek source used by the KJV translators.

The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

Next, the verb "shall...be thrown down" is from the Greek word that means "to dissolve", "to disunite", "destroy", and "break up." It literally means "loosen down" or "break down" from the same root as the word Christ uses to describe things "loose in heaven" and commandments being "broken." Jesus only uses this word in the parallels of this verse and in a verse referring to the law, saying that he did not come to tear it down. 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ταῦτα ( adj pl neut acc ) "These things" is tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." --

ἃ ( pron pl neut acc ) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -

θεωρεῖτε, ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act ) "Ye behold" is theoreo, which means "to see", "to look at", "to gaze," "to behold," (of the mind) "to contemplate", "to consider", "to observe (as a spectator)", "to gaze", "to gape", "to inspect (troops)" and, in abstract, "to theorize" and "to speculate." It originally means literally, "to be sent to see an oracle." --

ἐλεύσονται ( verb 3rd pl fut ind mid ) "Will come" is erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. --

ἡμέραι ( adj pl fem nom ) "The days" is hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)." --

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". --

αἷς ( pron pl fem dat ) "The which" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. --

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἀφεθήσεται ( verb 3rd sg fut ind pass ) "There shall be...left" is aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." --

λίθος (noun sg masc nom) "Stone" is lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones.

ἐπὶ (prep) "Against" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

λίθῳ (noun sg masc dat) "Another" is lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones. --

ὧδε (adv) Untranslated is hode, the demonstrative adverb that means of manner: "thus", "in this way", "so very"; of condition: "as it is", "as follows"; of places:: "hither" and "here".

ὃς ( pron sg masc nom ) "This" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. --

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

καταλυθήσεται. [uncommon] (verb 3rd sg fut ind pass ) "Be thrown down" is from katalyo, which means "to put down", "to destroy", "to dissolve", "to break up", "to dismiss", "to disband", "to abolish", "to bring to an end", "to unloose," and "to unyoke."

Wordplay: 

Related Verses: 

Dec 27 2018