Mark 10:33 [Saying], Behold, we go up to Jerusalem...

KJV Verse: 

Mark 10:33 Behold, we go up to Jerusalem; and the Son of man shall be delivered unto the chief priests, and unto the scribes; and they shall condemn him to death, and shall deliver him to the Gentiles:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Look! We are going up into Jerusalem and this child of the man is going to be given to those chief priests and those scribes and that are going to sentence him to death and they are going to give over to those foreigners.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

One surprising thing about this verse is that in the last part (starting with "chief priest," many of the words, both the verbs and the nouns. rhyme in the sense of having the same "ῦσιν" ending. All the verbs except the first one are the future tense rather than the form of possibility, which is often translated with the same "shall" in the KJV.

KJV Analysis: 

Behold, -- "Behold" is a verbal command meaning "See!" and "Look!" It is from the most common word meaning "to see" in Greek. In a humorous vein, it is also an adverbial exclamation like we use the phrase "tah-dah" in a magic show, or "voila" in French. "Look!" or "See!" comes closest in English. Jesus uses it both ways.

we -- This is from the first-person, plural form of the following verb.

go up  -- "Go" is from a verb which means "go up", "shoot up," and "ascend." It is also a word that means "ascending to higher knowledge."

to -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

Jerusalem; Jerusalem is the name of the city. Since it is Aramaic, different spellings are used in Greek.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but in a series, as it appears here, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "children". It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Jesus also used it metaphorically to describe those who follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.  The "son of man" is a common phrase used by Christ, discussed in this article. One good translated is "child of humanity."

of -- This is from the form of the following article and noun.

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article,. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

shall -- This is from future tense of the following verb. However,  this same helping/axillary verb is also used frequently in the KJV to represent the form of possibility, usually indicated by"might" in English.

be -- This is from the passive form of the following verb.

delivered --  "Delivered" is from a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is usually translated as "delivered up" or "handed over."

unto -- This word comes from the dative case of the following word(s) that requires the addition of a preposition in English: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, and an "in" for area of affect.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

chief priests, -- "Chief priests" is from a wor that means "arch-priest", "high priest," and "chief priest."

and --  The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but in a series, as it appears here, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

unto -- This word comes from the dative case of the following word(s) that requires the addition of a preposition in English: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, and an "in" for area of affect.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

scribes; -- "Scribes" is from a word that generally means a "secretary", "registrar", "recorder," and "scholar." It is used something like we use the word "intellectuals."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but in a series, as it appears here, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

they -- This is from the plural, third-person form of the following verb.

shall -- This is from future tense of the following verb. However,  this same helping/axillary verb is also used frequently in the KJV to represent the form of possibility, usually indicated by"might" in English.

condemn him to death,

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but in a series, as it appears here, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

shall -- This is from future tense of the following verb. However,  this same helping/axillary verb is also used frequently in the KJV to represent the form of possibility, usually indicated by"might" in English.

deliver --  "Deliver" is from a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is usually translated as "delivered up" or "handed over."

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

to -- This "to" comes from the dative case of the following word(s) that requires the addition of a preposition in English: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, and an "in" for area of affect.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Gentiles: -- "Gentiles" is from the word from which we get our word "ethnic." It means, generally "a number of people living together," any "body of men," or "tribe," but Christ uses it more like "foreigners." The "gentiles" of Christ's time referred to the state power of Rome, but we can assume that it is any group of non-believers. In our time, it is, of course, the secular state.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἰδοὺ (adv, verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold is from idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

ἀναβαίνομεν (verb 1st pl pres ind act) "We go up" is from anabaino, which means "go up", "mount", "ascend," [of ships] "go onboard", "rise to speak", "ascend to higher knowledge," [of plants] "shoot up," [of events] "result from," [of a male] "mount," and [of hearts] "enter."

εἰς (prep) To" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

Ἰερουσαλήμ, (Aramaic) "Jerusalem" is from Hierosolyma, which is the Greek word that denotes the city or its inhabitants.

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

(article sg masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

υἱὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -- The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

παραδοθήσεται (verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be delivered" is from paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow."

τοῖς (article sg masc gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἀρχιερεῦσιν (noun pl masc dat) "Unto the Chief priests" is from archiereus, which means "arch-priest" and "chief priest."

καὶ (adj/conj) And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τοῖς (article sg masc gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

γραμματεῦσιν, (noun pl masc dat) "Scribes" is from grammateus, which is generally a "secretary", "registrar", "recorder," and "scholar," but specifically means someone who uses gramma which is Greek for "drawings", "a letter," (as in an alphabet)"diagrams," and "letters" (as in correspondence).

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

κατακρινοῦσιν (verb 3rd pl fut ind act) "They shall condemn" is from katakrinô (katakrino), which means "to give a sentence against", "to condemn," "to judge against," and in the passive, "to be judged."

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

θανάτῳ, (noun sg masc dat) "To death" is from thanatos, which means "death" "kinds of death," specifically, "violent death", "corpse," and "a death sentence." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

παραδώσουσιν (verb 3rd pl fut ind act) "Shall deliver" is from paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow."

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

τοῖς (article spl neut dat) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἔθνεσιν (noun pl neut dat) "To the gentiles" is from ethnos, which means "a number of people living together", "company", "body of men," "tribe", "a people", "nation," and (later) "foreign, barbarous nations." -- The word translated as "Gentiles" does not mean gentiles or even foreigners. Its primary meaning is "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. It is in the same form as the "them" above, so "to them" or "for them."

Wordplay: 

When Jesus seems a little wordy in his construction, it is because he so often follows the three plus one form. Notice the basic three-part construction of the transitory action: going up, handed over, and being judged. The three actions represent the three temporal realms: the physical (going up), the emotional/social  (being handed over) and the intellectual (being judged). The initial verb "see" plays the role of the plus one, representing the eternal perspective.

In a similar way, Jesus mentions three groups of temporary people: the gentiles (the physical), the priests (the emotional/social), and the scribes (the intellectual). Christ himself as the Son of man becomes the plus one, the realm of the eternal.

This statement can be also seen as an extension of the previous verse. Christ will be delivered for judgment and execution as a result of the best being the worst.

Related Verses: 

Oct 18 2019