Mark 10:39 You shall indeed drink of the cup...

KJV Verse: 

Mark 10:39 Ye shall indeed drink of the cup that I drink of; and with the baptism that I am baptized withal shall ye be baptized:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

This cup that I myself am drinking, you are drinking, and the dipping that I myself am being dipped, you are going to be dipped.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In the Greek, the wordplay between the first person verbs (I drink) and the second person forms (you shall drink) has more force since these  verb are right next to each other.  The from of "you shall drink" is ambiguous in tense. It could the the future tense, but it could also be the present. In the earlier verse, Mark 10:38, the tense of "can you drink" was also present, not future.

KJV Analysis: 

Ye -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the following verb.

shall -- This indicates the future tense of the following verb, but the verb is ambiguous. It could also be the present tense.

indeed -- There is no Greek word for "indeed" in the Greek version that we use today.

drink "Drink" is the verb that means to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

of -- This seems ot indicate a genitive noun case, but the noun is a simple accusative object.

the --The word translated as "the"  is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

cup -- The word for "the cup" means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple. The cup is used by Christ as a symbol for sharing burdens.  It can mean the contents not just the cup itself like we use "cup" in a recipe, "add a cup" doesn't mean adding the cup itself. 

that -- The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I  -- The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

drink "Drink" is the verb that means to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

of; -- Again, this isn't justified by the form fot the words.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

with -- There is no "with" in the Greek.

the--The word translated as "the"  is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

baptism The Greek word translated as "baptism" is used as a noun only in the New Testament. It is from a verb, used later in this verse, that means "to dip", "to drench", "to plunge", or "to get into deep water".  "Immersion" might be a comparable idea in English. 

that -- The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I -- The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

am -- This is from the passive, present form of the following verb.

baptized -- The Greek verb translated as "baptized" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." It is a future passive form, "you will be immersed". 

withal -- There is no Greek word here that means "with" or "withal."

shall -- This "shall" indicate the unambiguous future tense of the following verb. However, the KJV translators also use this word to indicate the form of possibility so the "shall" is a bit ambiguous.

ye -- This is from the second-person plural form of the next verb.

be -- This is from the passive form of the verb.

baptized: -- The Greek verb translated as "baptized" means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." It is a future passive form, "you will be immersed". 

 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Τὸ  (article sg neut acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ποτήριον (noun sg neut acc) "Cup" is poterion, which means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple. -

 (pron sg neut acc ) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. 

ἐγὼ (pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself. --

πίνω  verb 1st sg pres ind act () "I drink" is pino, which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up." -- The word "drink" is the Greek for meaning to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

πίεσθε (verb 2nd pl fut ind mid or verb 2nd pl pres ind mid) "You shall drink" is pino, which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up." -- The word "drink" is the Greek for meaning to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

τὸ (article sg neut acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

βάπτισμα (noun sg neut acc/nom) "The baptism" is from baptisma which is used as a noun only in the New Testament. It is from a verb, used later in the verse, that means "to dip", "to drench", "to plunge", or "to get into deep water". 

 (pron sg neut acc ) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἐγὼ (pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

βαπτίζομαι (verb 1st sg pres ind mp) "I am baptized" is from baptizo) which means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water."

βαπτισθήσεσθε, (verb 2nd pl fut ind pass) "You shall be baptized" is from baptizo) which means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water."

Related Verses: 

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

While the previous verse was a question having the power (or the will) to pursue Jesus's specific path, this verse is about the inevitability about certain aspects of that path. The cup is the symbol of suffering and  death that arises directly from the pleasures of life (see previous verse for more on this). Baptism is the symbol of rebirth.Why does Christ repeat this verse twice, first as a question and second as a statement? To parallel the questions that we have about our fate in dying followed by the certainty of rebirth. That certainty is emphasized here with the use of the first word in the sentence, "indeed."

Oct 22 2019