Matthew 10:10 Nor scrip for your journey,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Don't want a provisions bag for a way.  Neither two tunics. Nor footwear. Nor a staff. Because worthy  the workman of that sustenance of his.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:10 Nor scrip for your journey, neither two coats, neither shoes, nor yet staves: for the workman is worthy of his meat.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse contains no verbs but demonstrate how one type of Greek negative (see this article) can imply the verb "want" or "think." This demonstrates the difference between spoken and written language (see this article).  The long list of words connected by conjunctions is an example of Jesus's humor (see this article).

NIV : 

Matthew 10:10 no bag for the journey or extra shirt or sandals or a staff, for the worker is worth his keep.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:10 Don’t carry a traveler’s bag with a change of clothes and sandals or even a walking stick. Don’t hesitate to accept hospitality, because those who work deserve to be fed.

Wordplay: 

 A mention of underwear contrasted with staffs of authority. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

μὴ (partic) "Nor" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. --

πήραν (noun sg fem acc) "Scrip" is from pera, which means a "leather pouch to carry food", "a bag for traveling," or "a wallet."

εἰς (prep) "For" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

ὁδὸν (noun sg fem acc) "Journey" is from hodos, which means literally "the way" or "the road" but which is used symbolically to mean "a way of doing things" or "a philosophy of life."

μηδὲ (partic) "Neither" is from mede, which means "and not", "but not", "nor," and "not."

δύο (numeral) "Two" is from duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair."

χιτῶνας (noun pl masc acc) "Coats" is from chiton, which means "the garment worn next to the skin", "tunic [a men's]", "a coating", "a covering", "a membrane [anatomical]", "the upper part of a show", "vesture," and "coat of mail."

μηδὲ (partic) "Neither" is from mede, which means "and not", "but not", "nor," and "not."

ὑποδήματα (noun pl neut acc) "Shoes" is from hupodema, which means "a sole bound under the foot with straps," and "a sandal."

μηδὲ (partic) "Neither" is from mede, which means "and not", "but not", "nor," and "not."

ῥάβδον: (noun sg fem acc) "Staves" is from rhabdos, which means a "magic wand", "fishing-rod", "limed twig (for catching small birds)", "shaft of a hunting-spear", "staff of office", "shepherd's staff or crook", "measuring-rod", "line", "verse", "a critical mark," and "stroke forming a letter."

ἄξιος (adj sg masc nom) "Worthy" is from axios, which means "counterbalancing", "weighing as much", "of like value", "worth as much as", "worthy", "goodly", "deserved", "due", "worthy", "estimable", "worthy of", "deserving", "fit", "due," and "as deserved."

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

(article sg masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἐργάτης (noun sg masc nom) "Workman" is from ergates, which means "workman", "one who works the soil", "husbandman", "hard-working", "strenuous", "one who practices an art", "practitioner", "doer," and "producer." It is also the word for the god "Hermes".

τῆς (article sg fem gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

τροφῆς (noun sg fem gen) "Meat" is from trophe, which means "nourishment", "food", "that which provides sustenance", "provisions", "nurture", "rearing," and "education."

αὐτοῦ. (adj sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

KJV Analysis: 

Nor   -- (WW) The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. It is not the "nor" that appears below. This word is normally translated as "no" or "not.
 The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done.  Since no verb appears in this verse, this negative implies "to want."  More about the Greek negative in this article.

scrip   -- "Scrip" is translated from a Greek word specifically meaning a leather pouch to carry food or provisions for traveling. We might call this a knapsack or provisions bagor travel bag.

for   -- The word translated as "for" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "for" toward a purpose, and "up to" limits in time and measure. Here the sense is "for" a purpose.

your -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "your" in the Greek source.

journey,   -- (WW) "Journey" is a Greek word that means "way", both in the sense of a road or path and a way of thinking, like our English word "way." It doesn't mean "journey."

neither -- The word for "neither" is the Greek negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

two -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple." It is the numeral.

coats, -- (WW) The word "coats" is the Greek word that means a tunic, not an outer garment.

nor -- The word for "nor" is the Greek negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

shoes, -- Shoes" is the Greek word for sandals that a person ties on.

nor -- The word for "nor" is the Greek negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

yet -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "yet" in the Greek source.

staves: -- (WN) "Staves" is translated from a Greek word meaning a "staff", any type of long pole, primarily those used for gathering food or managing a herd of animals. It also means a staff of authority. The staff became a symbol of a bishop's authority. The word is singular, not plural.

for   -- The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

workman -- "Workman" is from the Greek that means worker, often, farm worker but it more specifically means a "doer," a "producer," or one who practices an art. It separates people that do the work from those who supervise. Supervisors are the ones with the shoes and staff.

is -- There is no verb "is" in the Greek source. It is implied by the equating of "workman" with "worthy" both in the Greek form of subjects.

worthy --  The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. When used with the verb "to be", it means "fit" or "due". From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give values for equal value.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

his    -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. The pronoun follows the noun so the sense is "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

meat. -- The word translated as "meat" means "meat," "nourishment", "nurture," and "education." It is in the possessive form, so "of meat" or "of nurture". The Greeks used this word like we say "earning a living" in phrases meaning "earning your keep."

KJV Translation Issues: 

7
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "not" means "Don't want."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "your" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "journey" means "way."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "coats" means "tunics."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "yet" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "staves" is translated as plural but it is singular.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

No -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. It  This word is normally translated as "no" or "not.  The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done.  Since no verb appears in this verse, this negative implies "to want."  More about the Greek negative in this article.

bag -- "Bag" is translated from a Greek word specifically meaning a leather pouch to carry food or provisions for traveling. We might call this a knapsack or provisions bag or travel bag.

for   -- The word translated as "for" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "for" toward a purpose, and "up to" limits in time and measure. Here the sense is "for" a purpose.

the -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "the" in the Greek source.

journey,   -- (WW) "Journey" is a Greek word that means "way", both in the sense of a road or path and a way of thinking, like our English word "way." It doesn't mean "journey."

or -- (WW) The word for "or" is the Greek "nor," a negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

extra -- (WW) The Greek word for "extra" means "two" or a "couple." It is the numeral.

shirt, -- (WN) The word "shirt" is the Greek word that means a tunic.

or -- (WW) The word for "or" is the Greek a negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

sandals, -- "Sandals" is the Greek word for sandals that a person ties on.

or -- (WW) The word for "or" is the Greek a negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

staff: -- "Staff" is translated from a Greek word meaning a "staff", any type of long pole, primarily those used for gathering food or managing a herd of animals. It also means a staff of authority. The staff became a symbol of a bishop's authority. The word is singular, not plural.

for   -- The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

worker -- "Worker" is from the Greek that means worker, often, farm worker but it more specifically means a "doer," a "producer," or one who practices an art. It separates people that do the work from those who supervise. Supervisors are the ones with the shoes and staff.

is -- There is no verb "is" in the Greek source. It is implied by the equating of "workman" with "worthy" both in the Greek form of subjects.

worth --  The word translated here as "worth" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. When used with the verb "to be", it means "fit" or "due". From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give values for equal value.

his    -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. The pronoun follows the noun so the sense is "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

keep. -- The word translated as "meat" means "meat," "nourishment", "nurture," and "education." It is in the possessive form, so "of meat" or "of nurture". The Greeks used this word like we say "earning a living" in phrases meaning "earning your keep."

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "Journey" means "way."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "or" means "nor."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "extra" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "or" means "nor."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "or" means "nor."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NLT Analysis: 

Do  -- This helping verb is added to make this a negative sentence.

n't -- The negative "not" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. It  This word is normally translated as "no" or "not.  The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done.  Since no verb appears in this verse, this negative implies "to want."  More about the Greek negative in this article.

carry -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "carry" in the Greek source.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

traveler's bag -- "Traveler's bag" is translated from a Greek word specifically meaning a leather pouch to carry food or provisions for traveling. We might call this a knapsack or provisions bag or travel bag.

untranslated "for"-- (MW) The untranslated word "for" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "for" toward a purpose, and "up to" limits in time and measure. Here the sense is "for" a purpose.

untranslated "way"-- (MW) The untranslated word "way", both in the sense of a road or path and a way of thinking, like our English word "way." It doesn't mean "journey."

with a change of -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "with a change of" in the Greek source.

untranslated "neither"-- (MW) The untranslated word "nor," a negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

clothes, -- The word "clothes" is the Greek word that means a "shirt" or "tunic."

and -- (WW) The word for "and" is "nor,"  the Greek a negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

sandals, -- "Sandals" is the Greek word for sandals that a person ties on.

or -- (WW) The word for "or" is the Greek a negative of opinion plus the Greek word for "but." This word is repeated several times in a series. This gives it the "neither...nor" meaning.

even -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "even" in the Greek source.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

walking stick: -- "Walking stick" is translated from a Greek word meaning a "staff", any type of long pole, primarily those used for gathering food or managing a herd of animals. It also means a staff of authority. The staff became a symbol of a bishop's authority. The word is singular, not plural.

Don’t hesitate to accept hospitality, -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "don’t hesitate to accept hospitality," in the Greek source.

because -- The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

those -- (WN) The word translated as "those" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

who work-- "Who work" is from the Greek that means worker, often, farm worker but it more specifically means a "doer," a "producer," or one who practices an art. It separates people that do the work from those who supervise. Supervisors are the ones with the shoes and staff.

deserve --  (WF) The word translated here as "worth" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. When used with the verb "to be", it means "fit" or "due". From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give values for equal value. This word is an adjective, not a verb.

his    -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. The pronoun follows the noun so the sense is "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

to be  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "to be" in the Greek source.

fed. -- (WF) The word translated as "fed" means "meat," "nourishment", "nurture," and "education." It is in the possessive form, so "of meat" or "of nurture". The Greeks used this word like we say "earning a living" in phrases meaning "earning your keep." This is not a verb but a noun.

NLT Translation Issues: 

14
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "carry" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "for" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "way" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "with a change of" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "neither" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" means "nor."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "or" means "nor."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "even" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "don’t hesitate to accept hospitality," doesn't exist in the source.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "those" is translated as plural but it is singular.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "deserve" is not a verb but an adjective, "worthy."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "to be" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "fed" is not a verb but a noun, "nourishment."

The Spoken Version: 

“Traveling in small groups on the main roads is dangerous,” Big Simon explained. “We want to travel light.”
“What does that mean?” Asked Nat. “Can I take a travel bag for my extra underwear?”
Many chuckled.
“No travel bag for a road,” the teacher responded cheerfully. “Nor extra underwear.”
Everyone laughed.
“So we can’t accept money,” said Jude. “What if someone takes pity on my worn out sandals and gives me new ones or gives me a walking stick?”
“Nor sandals,” the teacher said firmly but still smiling. “Nor staff.”
“If we have no money, we will starve!” Complained Nat.
The teacher laughed along with everyone else. Nat was notoriously hungry.
“We can accept food from people, Nat,” James interjected. “Just like we have all along.”
“Why is food different than money?” Jude asked.
“Since worthy a worker,” the teacher explained, clapping Nat on the shoulder. “Of that food of his.”

evidence: 

115.00

Front Page Date: 

Mar 2 2020