Matthew 10:30 But even the hairs of your head

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Concerning you, however? Even those hairs of that head, are all having been counted,

KJV : 

Matthew 10:30 But the very hairs of your head are all numbered.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

First, this statement is clearly light-hearted. It is part of the setup for the punchline in the next verse. To understand the joke better, we have to know that a "hair" is a metaphor "tiny." The sparrows of the previous and next verses are described as "tiny" sparrows. However, this verse also makes me wonder how many men in Jesus's group were already balding. However, it also contains a surprise, one that is typical of Jesus.

Everything thing in this verse is plural, except for the word "head" as if all the apostles shared one head. The phrase is "that head (singular) of yours (plural)." Jesus does this commonly when referring to body parts. For example, in Mark 8:17, a singular heart is also shared by all the apostles. This style may be Jesus's way of making statements addressed to groups feel more personal since both our heads and our hearts are the most personal things we have.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:30 And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:30 And the very hairs on your head are all numbered.

Wordplay: 

The Greek phrase "hairs of your head" could metaphorically means "the hair's width of your accomplishment have all paid for themselves." Head also metaphorically means "life". 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is from humon, the plural gentive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

δὲ (partic) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

καὶ (conj) "Very" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

αἱ (article pl fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

τρίχες (noun pl fem nom ) "Hairs" is from thrix, which means "human hair", "a single hair", "a horse's mane", "sheep's wool", "pig bristles," "a hair's breadth."

τῆς (article sg fem gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

κεφαλῆς (noun sg fem gen) "Of...head" is from kephale, which means "head of a man or beast", "an extremity", "the top", "the capital (top) of a pillar", "the coping of a wall", "the source of a rivalry," and, metaphorically the "crowning" or "completion" of a thing.

πᾶσαι (adj pl fem nom) "All" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

ἠριθμημέναι (part pl perf mp fem nom ) "Numbered" is arithmeo, which means "to count," and "to number," but for the tax collector it also means "to count out", "to pay," and "to account."

εἰσίν. (3rd pl pres ind act ) "Are" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

KJV Analysis: 

But The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

very -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "very" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also" "even").

hairs -- "Hairs" is the Greek word for both the hair of humans and animals. As in English, it is a metaphor for a small width.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

your -- (WP) "Your" is from the Greek second person plural pronoun. It is in the possessive, but it begins the sentence, not appearing near the word for "hair" or "head." This word starts the verse. It does not modify the word "head."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

head -- The term translated as "head", it means "head" and "top" but also the completion of a thing (as we say, "bringing it to a head"). It is also a metaphor for life ("losing your head" in Greek doesn't mean an emotional outburst, but being killed).

are -- The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. This  is not a helping verb that creates a passive verb as in English. It equates the subject with its characteristics.

all -- The word translated as "all" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. As an adverb, as here, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

numbered. -- (WT) "Numbered" is from the Greek source of our word "arithmetic," which means "to count", "to number", "to count out", "to pay," and "to account." It is in a form which indicates that they, as the subject, are acting on themselves, so "have accounted for themselves" or "have paid for themselves." However, the tense is not the simple past, but the past perfect passive so "having been numbered."

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "very" is not the Greek word that means "very."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "your" doesn't appear here modifying "head" but are the beginning of the sentence.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "numbered" is not the simple past, but a past, prefect, passive participle, "having been numbered."

NIV Analysis: 

And -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" is usually translated as "but" and joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

even --   The Greek word translated as "even" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also" "even").

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

very  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "very" in the Greek source.

hairs -- "Hairs" is the Greek word for both the hair of humans and animals. As in English, it is a metaphor for a small width.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

your -- (WP) "Your" is from the Greek second person plural pronoun. It is in the possessive, but it begins the sentence, not appearing near the word for "hair" or "head." This word starts the verse. It does not modify the word "head."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

head -- The term translated as "head", it means "head" and "top" but also the completion of a thing (as we say, "bringing it to a head"). It is also a metaphor for life ("losing your head" in Greek doesn't mean an emotional outburst, but being killed).

are -- The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. This  is not a helping verb that creates a passive verb as in English. It equates the subject with its characteristics.

all -- The word translated as "all" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. As an adverb, as here, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

numbered. -- (WT) "Numbered" is from the Greek source of our word "arithmetic," which means "to count", "to number", "to count out", "to pay," and "to account." It is in a form which indicates that they, as the subject, are acting on themselves, so "have accounted for themselves" or "have paid for themselves." However, the tense is not the simple past, but the past perfect passive so "having been numbered."

NIV Translation Issues: 

5
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" should be "but."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "very" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "your" doesn't appear here modifying "head" but are the beginning of the sentence.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "numbered" is not the simple past, but a past, prefect, passive participle, "having been numbered."

NLT Analysis: 

And -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" is usually translated as "but" and joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

very -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "very" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also" "even").

hairs -- "Hairs" is the Greek word for both the hair of humans and animals. As in English, it is a metaphor for a small width.

on -- (WW) This word "on"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

your -- (WP) "Your" is from the Greek second person plural pronoun. It is in the possessive, but it begins the sentence, not appearing near the word for "hair" or "head." This word starts the verse. It does not modify the word "head."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

head -- The term translated as "head", it means "head" and "top" but also the completion of a thing (as we say, "bringing it to a head"). It is also a metaphor for life ("losing your head" in Greek doesn't mean an emotional outburst, but being killed).

are -- The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. This  is not a helping verb that creates a passive verb as in English. It equates the subject with its characteristics.

all -- The word translated as "all" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. As an adverb, as here, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

numbered. -- (WT) "Numbered" is from the Greek source of our word "arithmetic," which means "to count", "to number", "to count out", "to pay," and "to account." It is in a form which indicates that they, as the subject, are acting on themselves, so "have accounted for themselves" or "have paid for themselves." However, the tense is not the simple past, but the past perfect passive so "having been numbered."

NLT Translation Issues: 

6
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" should be "but."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "very" is not the Greek word that means "very."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "on" should be "of."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "your" doesn't appear here modifying "head" but are the beginning of the sentence.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "numbered" is not the simple past, but a past, prefect, passive participle, "having been numbered."

The Spoken Version: 

“Even the hairs of the head, all having accounted for themselves, they are—.” The teachers gesture stopped as Big Simon who was quite bald.
The crowd laughed.

evidence: 

135.00

Front Page Date: 

Mar 22 2020