Matthew 13:8 But others fell into good ground,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 13:8 But others fell into good ground, and brought forth fruit, some an hundredfold, some sixtyfold, some thirtyfold.

 

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Another, however, fell on good quality dirt and produced results. This one, indeed, a hundred This one, however, sixty. This one, however, thirty.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Notice that in the three prior iterations, the seed fell "on" the ground, but in the KJV, it falls "into" the ground here. However, the same preposition is used here as the earlier versions in Matthew. Interestingly, however, the Mark 4:8  version of this verse does change use a different Greek preposition, one that means "into."  The words translated as "some" in the last part of the verse are not the same Greek word translated as "some" in earlier iterations and "others" here, but rather it is a word meaning "this." The quantities in this version decrease, which is humorous. This humor is reflect in a series of words that are not translated in the verse In Mark, they increase.

This is the fourth and last place that the "seeds" fall. The four together have been "in the way", "the rocky places", "among thistles,' and "the good earth." In the previous chapter, Christ also discussed four "motivations" for people: religion, the belly (appetites), the head (wealth and wisdom), and the heart. There is a hidden parallel in that "the way" means philosophy or religion. The physical appetites of the belly (the "whale") are "hard places." The wealth and wisdom (Solomon's) of the head represents thorns. The good earth is the "heart", specifically, "the heart of the earth" (Mat 12:40).
 

KJV Analysis: 

But "But" is the Greek word for "but" that joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. It is the same word used in the related previous verses (Mat 13:4, Mat 13:5, Mat 13:7 ) but it was either translated as "and" or not translated at all.

others The word translated as "some" means "other" and "different.' It is a more negative word that the English "some," also meaning "wrong", "untrue," and unworthy." The form here is feminine, singular. We see the form of this word change from feminine to masculine in the various interactions of this verse in different Gospels.

fell "Fell" is translated from a Greek word that means "to fall" and "to fall down." Like our word "to fall" it has a number of special meanings including "to fall into a given class", "to prostrate", "to fall from power", "to perish," and so on.

into  The word translated as "into" means "against", "before", "by" or "on." It is the same preposition as was translated as "on" in earlier verses.

good The word translated as "good" referring to the "fruit" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." It is different than the verb above. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil" in the KJV.

ground, The word translated as "earth" means the physical planet. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet. See this article for more on the differences between the planet, the "world,"and "heaven".

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

brought forth "Brought forth" is from the Greek word almost always translated as "give" in the KJV Gospels. It means "to give", "to offer", "to devote oneself," and "to propose."

fruit, The word translated as "fruit" primary meaning is "fruit", "seed," or "offspring," but its secondary meaning is "returns," specifically, "profit," as we would say "fruit of our labors." It has a stronger economic sense of return on an investment that our English "fruit," and is even used to mean taxes.

some The word translated as "some" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

untranslated Untranslated is the expression generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly."

an There is no Greek indefinite article here.

hundredfold, This is the number "a hundred."

some The word translated as "some" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

sixtyfold, This Greek word means the number "sixty" or "the sixtieth part."

untranslated This is the Greek word translated as "but"  "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

some The word translated as "some" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

untranslated This is the Greek word translated as "but"  "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

thirtyfold. "Thirtyfold" is the word that means "thirty."

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἄλλα (adj sg fem nom) "Others" is from allos, which means "another", "one besides", "of another sort", "different", "other than what is true", "as well", "besides," {with numerals: "yet", "still", "further"), "of other sort", "other than what is", "untrue", "unreal", "other than right", "wrong", "bad", "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest", "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

δὲ (partic) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ἔπεσεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Fell" is from the verb pipto, which means "to fall", "to fall down", "to be cast down," "fall upon", "intersect (geometry)", "meet", "pass through", "fall violently upon", "attack", "fall in battle", "sink{in water)", "fall short i.e. fail", " fall out of", "lose a thing", "escape from", "fall asleep", "to be accessible to perception", "to fall (between her feet, i.e. to be born)", "to let fall[dice)", "turn out," and "fall under (belong to a class)."

ἐπὶ (prep) The word translated as "upon" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

τὴν γῆν (noun sg fem acc)  "Earth" is from ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky.

τὴν καλὴν (adj sg fem acc) "Good" is from kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."

καὶ (prep) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐδίδου (3rd sg imperf ind act) "Brought forth" is from didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over," "assign", "offer (to the gods)", "propose", "deliberate", "hand over", "deliver up", "appoint (a priest)", "establish", "concede (in argument)", "to give oneself," and "to describe."

καρπόν, (noun sg masc acc) "Fruit" is karpos, which means "fruit", "the fruits of the earth", "seed", "offspring", "returns for profit," and "reward."

 (pron sg neut nom) "Some" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

μὲν (partic) " Untranslated is men, which is generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly."

ἑκατὸν (numeral) "An hundredfold" is from hekaton, which is the number "a hundred."

(pron sg neut nom) "Some" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

δὲ  (partic) Untranslated is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ἑξήκοντα  (numeral) "Sixtyfold" is from hexekonta, which means the number "sixty" or "the sixtieth part."

(pron sg neut nom) "Some" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. Untranslated is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

δὲ (partic)  Untranslated is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

τριάκοντα.  (numeral) "Thirtyfold" is from triakonta which means "thirty."

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "earth" means both the planet and dirt.

The word "brought forth" means "to give" and has a number of meanings including "to offer (to the gods)" and "to devote oneself." 

The word "fruit" also means "profit" or "reward." 

The Spoken Version: 

"Others," he said as he recovered. "Fell onto high quality dirt and produced a crop."
He spread his hands, gesturing at the children, and announced "These, a hundred fold!"

The kids cheered!

He gestured toward their parents, "These...sixtyfold."

The kids hooted and pointed.

"And these," he said gesturing to his disciples with sad shrug, "Thirtyfold?"

Th crowd laughed.

Related Verses: