Matthew 13:7 And some fell among thorns;

KJV Verse: 

Mat 13:7 And some fell among thorns; and the thorns sprung up, and choked them:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

But others tripped against the thorns and the thorns climbed up on them and suffocated them.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The first few word of this verse is the same as Mat 13:5, this is hidden because the "and/but" is not translated in the earlier verse. However, the "sprung up" in the earlier verse is different than the word translated here as "sprung up."

The word translated as "some" means "other" and "different.' It is a more negative word that the English "some," also meaning "wrong", "untrue," and unworthy." Again, Christ doesn't say what is scattered among thorns.

"And" is the Greek word for "but" that joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

"Fell" is translated from a Greek word that means "to fall" and "to fall down." Like our word "to fall" it has a number of special meanings including "to fall into a given class", "to prostrate", "to fall from power", "to perish," and so on.

The word translated as "among" means "against", "before", "by" or "on." 

This version comes closer to the Greek capturing Christ's view of the thorns, entwining their victims like an aggressive vine.

"Thorns" is a noun which means "thorns", "prickle" or a thorny or prickly plant. As in English, the term "thorny" is used as a metaphor for "difficult", "tricky," or "painful" as in "a thorny question."

"Sprung up" is NOT the "sprung up" from Matt 13:6, but a different word, anabainô, which means "to go up", "to mount," and "to turn up." For plants, it is used specifically to describe when plants grow on sticks or other plants, entwining them, or "mounting" them.

"Choked" is a verb that means "to choke", "to suffocate," and "to be drowned." As in English, it is used to denote being choked with rage or annoyance.

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἄλλα (adj pl neut nom) "Some" is from allos, which means "another", "one besides", "of another sort", "different", "other than what is true", "as well", "besides," {with numerals: "yet", "still", "further"), "of other sort", "other than what is", "untrue", "unreal", "other than right", "wrong", "bad", "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest", "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

δὲ "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ἔπεσεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Fell" is from the verb pipto, which means "to fall", "to fall down", "to be cast down," "fall upon", "intersect (geometry)", "meet", "pass through", "fall violently upon", "attack", "fall in battle", "sink{in water)", "fall short i.e. fail", " fall out of", "lose a thing", "escape from", "fall asleep", "to be accessible to perception", "to fall (between her feet, i.e. to be born)", "to let fall[dice)", "turn out," and "fall under (belong to a class)."

ἐπὶ (prep)  "Upon" is from epi. which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against." -

τὰς ἀκάνθας, (noun pl fem acc) "Thorns" is akantha, which means "thorns", "prickly" or a thorny or prickly plant. As in English, the term "thorny" is used as a metaphor for difficult, as in "a thorny question."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀνέβησαν (3rd pl aor ind act) "Sprung up" is from anabainô, which means "to go up", "to mount," and "to turn up." It is the word used for mounting a horse, going aboard a ship, or ascending to heaven. For plants, it is used specifically to describe when plants grow on sticks or other plants, entwining them, or "mounting" them.

αἱ ἄκανθαι  (noun pl fem nom) "The thorns" is akantha, which means "thorns", "prickly" or a thorny or prickly plant. As in English, the term "thorny" is used as a metaphor for difficult, as in "a thorny question."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀπέπνιξαν  (verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Choked" is apopnigô, which "to suffocate", "to choke", "to cut off", "to kill," "to suffocate," and "to be drowned." As in English, the is used to denote being choked with rage or frustration.

αὐτά. (adj sg neut acc) "Them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

The Spoken Version: 

But others," he said, looking up and raising his hand in mock fear. "Got tripped up among the thorns!"

The children giggled. And the crowd giggled at them giggling.

"And the thorns crawled up all over them," he said.

His hand rose up in a crawling motion toward the children.

"And they strangled them!" he said as his hands crawled to his own throat, choking him.

The crowd laughed again.

 

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