Matthew 7:21 Not everyone who says to me, Lord, Lord,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

The Sermon on the Mount, invisible and visible, speaking and acting

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Not everyone saying to me, "Master, master," is going to get themselves into the realm of the skies. But the one creating the desire of the Father of mine the one in the skies.

KJV : 

Matthew 7:21 Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Lost in translation here is the fact that Jesus uses the Greek word translated as "heaven" in both the singular and the plural.  This is unusual because in referring to both the kingdom of heaven or his Father in heaven, the plural, "skies" is most often used. This is left out of English translation because multiple "heavens" doesn't fit the religious translation of this work. However, it is a good example of how Jesus used the word differently than we use it today. See this article on the "realm of the skies."

NIV : 

Matthew 7:21 Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven.

My Takeaway: 

Action can be worthwhile or worthless, but words without action are always worthless.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὐ (adv) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

πᾶς (adj sg masc nom) ​"Every" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

(article sg masc nom)  "One" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

λέγων (part sg pres act masc nom) "That sayeth" is from lego), which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." Another Greek word spelled the same means "to pick up", "to choose for oneself", "to pick out," and "to count." It is introduced with an article, "the one saying."

μοι (pron 1st sg dat) "Me" is from moi, which means "I", "me", and "my".

Κύριε κύριε (noun sg masc voc) "Lord" is from kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

εἰσελεύσεται (3rd sg fut ind mid) "Shall enter" is from eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem acc)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

βασιλείαν (noun sg fem acc) "Kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign." --

τῶν (article pl masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

οὐρανῶν, (noun pl masc gen) "Of heaven" is from ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate."

ἀλλ᾽ (conj) "But" is from alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

(article sg masc nom)   "He" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ποιῶν (part sg pres act masc nom) "He that doeth" is from poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

τὸ (article sg neut nom/acc)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

θέλημα (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Will" is from the noun, thelema, which means "will" and "pleasure."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πατρός (noun sg masc gen) "The Father" is from pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

μου (pron 1st sg masc gen) "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "Which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τοῖς (article pl masc dat) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

οὐρανοῖς. (noun pl masc dat) "Heaven" is from ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate."

KJV Analysis: 

Not  - The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Often adding "really" helps communicate its feeling.

every  -  The word translated as "every one" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. As an adverb, as here, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether." It is singular. - 

one -- The word translated as "one" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source.

saith  - (WF) The word translated as "sayeth" is the verb used primarily for "to say" and "to speak," but Jesus often uses it to mean "to teach" or "to relay" information. It is a verb in the form of an adjective, "saying" uses as a noun introduced by an article "the", "the one saying".

unto -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

me, -- The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me", though the form has other uses in Greek. 

Lord, Lord,  - The word translated as "lord" is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master," "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

enter  - The word translated as "enter" means literally "to start into" or "to move into." The form here indicates that this is something that someone does to themselves, "enter in for themselves" but this is generally assumed for the English word "enter."

into  - The word translated as "into" means "into" with regard to a place, "until" with regard to a time, and "towards" with regards to a relationship.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

kingdom  - The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so it's translated as "reign" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

heaven  -  The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article. This word is singular.

; but  - The Greek word translated as "but" is not the most common Greek word used for "but." It notes an exception and can be translated as "except." Here Christ is noting an exception.

he -- (WW) The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source.

doeth  - (WF) The Greek word translated as "does" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. This verb is a participle. "doing" or "performing" used as a noun, "the one performing" the subject of the sentence.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

will  - The word translated as "will" means what someone wants or desires as well as the "will" of character. It mostly means what one wishes or has determined shall be done. It also means a desire or a choice. When applied to people, "desires" works, but when applied to God, the concept "purpose" seems closer to Christ's usage.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father  - "Father" is from the Greek word meaning "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

which -- (CW) -- The word translated as "which" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

is -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

in  - We should also recognize that the Greek word translated as "in" also has a range of meanings that make the phase more interesting. It does mean "within the limits of some space," but certainly Christ was not saying that God is confined to some restricted region we call "heaven." It also means an intimate connection between things, which more accurately describes God's connection with the "skies" or the universe.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

heaven. - (WN) The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article. The word is plural, "skies." 

KJV Translation Issues: 

12
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  1. WF - Wrong Form -  The "sayeth" is not an active verb but a participle, "saying."
  2. MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "heaven" is not shown in the English translation.
  3. WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "he" should be "the one."
  4. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  5. WF - Wrong Form -  The "doeth" is not an active verb but a participle, "doing."
  6. MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "father" is not shown in the English translation.
  7. the future tense but a possibility requiring "should" or "might" as a helper verb.
  8. CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "which" is more like "the one" than "which" or "who."
  9. IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source.
  10. MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "heaven" is not shown in the English translation.
  11. WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but it is plural, "skies."

NIV Analysis: 

Not  - The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Often adding "really" helps communicate its feeling.

every-  -  The word translated as "every one" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. As an adverb, as here, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether." It is singular. - 

-one -- The word translated as "one" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

who -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who " in the Greek source.

says- (WF) The word translated as "says" is the verb used primarily for "to say" and "to speak," but Jesus often uses it to mean "to teach" or "to relay" information. It is a verb in the form of an adjective, "saying" uses as a noun introduced by an article "the", "the one saying".

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

me, -- The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me", though the form has other uses in Greek. 

Lord, Lord,  - The word translated as "lord" is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master," "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

enter  - The word translated as "enter" means literally "to start into" or "to move into." The form here indicates that this is something that someone does to themselves, "enter in for themselves" but this is generally assumed for the English word "enter."

untranslated "into"-- (MW) The untranslated word "into" means "into" with regard to a place, "until" with regard to a time, and "towards" with regards to a relationship.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

kingdom  - The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so it's translated as "reign" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

heaven  - The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article. This is singular, unlike the "skies" below.

; but  - The Greek word translated as "but" is not the most common Greek word used for "but." It notes an exception and can be translated as "except." Here Christ is noting an exception.

only -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "only" in the Greek source.

the one --  The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

who -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who " in the Greek source.

does - (WF) The Greek word translated as "does" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. This verb is a participle. "doing" or "performing" used as a noun, "the one performing" the subject of the sentence.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

will  - The word translated as "will" means what someone wants or desires as well as the "will" of character. It mostly means what one wishes or has determined shall be done. It also means a desire or a choice. When applied to people, "desires" works, but when applied to God, the concept "purpose" seems closer to Christ's usage.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

my -- "My" is the first-person possessive singular pronoun. This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father  - "Father" is from the Greek word meaning "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

who -- (CW) -- The word translated as "who" is the Greek definite article, which when not preceding a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

is -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

in  - We should also recognize that the Greek word translated as "in" also has a range of meanings that make the phase more interesting. It does mean "within the limits of some space," but certainly Christ was not saying that God is confined to some restricted region we call "heaven." It also means an intimate connection between things, which more accurately describes God's connection with the "skies" or the universe.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

heaven. - (WN) The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article. The word is plural, "skies." 

NIV Translation Issues: 

12
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "sayeth" is not an active verb but a participle, "saying."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "heaven" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "only" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who " doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "does" is not an active verb but a participle, "doing."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "father" is not shown in the English translation.
  • the future tense but a possibility requiring "should" or "might" as a helper verb.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "who" is more like "the one" than "which" or "who."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "heaven" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "heaven" is translated as singular but it is plural, "skies."

The Spoken Version: 

Many in the crowd began bowing toward the Master and shouting his praises.
“You are our new master!”
“Lead us, Master! We trust only you!”
“Master! We will fight for your realm!”
In response, the Nazarene shook his head “no” with a sad smile.
Then he smiled more broadly, as if a new thought had occurred to him.
“Not everyone saying to me,” the Teacher began, changing into a squeaky, fawning voice, “‘Master! Master!’ will get himself,” he announced grandly, “into this realm of the sky.”
We noted his use of the singular, “sky,” but we didn’t know what it meant.  Then he pointed a finger upward.
“This realm of the skies,” we said.

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Jul 16 2020