Matthew 7:27 And the rain descended, and the floods came,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

The Sermon on the Mount, valuable and worthless,  not acting,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And, it came down...the rain. And they showed up...the floods. And they blew...the winds. And they smashed against..the house, that one, and it fell. And it was, the crash of it, tremendous.

KJV : 

Matthew 7:27 And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell: and great was the fall of it.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Because the first part of this verse is mostly a repeat of the first part of Matthew 7:25. This means that the "joke" structure would not work in the same way. The only change is verb that get translated as "beat upon/beat against." This is the last verb in the series so the change of verb would be a different kind of surprise. The root of the earlier verb means "fall," which the root of this verb means "smash" or "chop."

In the second part of this verse, the foundation of the house is not emphasized as it was in the earlier verse. Instead, the size of its fall in emphasized. The  structure of the clauses leads to the final word, the punchline, is "great" or "huge."

NIV : 

Matthew 7:27 The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.

Wordplay: 

A play on the previous version of this verse in Mat 7:25.

My Takeaway: 

Choosing not to act on ideas that area proven leads to our biggest problems.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (and) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

κατέβη (3rd sg aor ind act) "Descended" is from katabaino, which means "go down", "come down from," and "dismount from." Metaphorically, it means "attain", "conform to", "condescend", "fall in value," and "arrive at the end [of a speech]."

(article sg fem nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

βροχὴ [2 verses](noun sg fem nom) "Rain" is from broche, which means "rain" "moistening", "steeping (in brewing)", "inundation (of the Nile)," and "irrigation."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἦλθαν (3rd pl aor ind act) "Came" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ποταμοὶ [5 verses] (noun pl masc nom) "Floods" is potamos, which means "river", "stream", "artificial river," and "canal."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἔπνευσαν [ 4verses] (3rd pl aor ind act) "Blew" is pneo, which means "blow", "breath", "give off an odor", "breath forth," and "breath out."

οἱ (article pl masc nom )  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

ἄνεμοι [6 verses](noun pl masc nom ) "The winds" is anemos, which means "wind", "a cardinal point," or "quarter." It means both the physical wind and the direction from which the wind comes.

προσέπεσαν [3 verses](3rd pl aor ind act) "Beat upon" is proskopto, which means "to strike against", "to stumble upon", "to encounter friction", "to offend," and "to take offense at." The root koptô means "to smite", "to pound," "to chop," "to cut off," and "to beat one's breast. The prefix means "against" or "towards."

τῇ (article sg neut dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

οἰκίᾳ (noun sg fem dat) "House" is from oikia, which means "house", "building," and "household."

ἐκείνῃ, (adj sg fem dat) "That" is ekeinos, which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἔπεσεν, (3rd sg aor ind act) "It fell" is from the verb pipto, which means "to fall", "to fall down", "to be cast down," "fall upon", "intersect (geometry)", "meet", "pass through", "fall violently upon", "attack", "fall in battle", "sink{in water)", "fall short i.e. fail", " fall out of", "lose a thing", "escape from", "fall asleep", "to be accessible to perception", "to fall (between her feet, i.e. to be born)", "to let fall[dice)", "turn out," and "fall under (belong to a class)."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἦν (3rd sg imperf ind act) "Was" was from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

(article sg fem nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

πτῶσις [2 verses](noun sg fem nom ) "The fall" is ptosis, which means "falling", "fall", "calamity (metaphor)", "death(metaphor)", "modification (grammar: of a word)," and "arrangement of terms (in a syllogism)." Not to be confused with ptoma (πτῶμα) which means the result of a fall.

αὐτῆς (adj sg fem gen ) "Of it" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

μεγάλη (adj sg fem nom) "Great" is from megas, which means "big," "great", "full-grown", "vast", "high", "long", "mighty", "strong (of elements)", "loud (of sounds)," "over-great (in a bad sense)", "impressive (of style)", "far (of distance)", "weighty," and "important."

KJV Analysis: 

And  - The Greek word translated as "and" repeatedly here is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

rain The word translated as "rain" primarily means "rain" but it also has the sense of irrigation flooding. This appears later in the Greek than in the KJV translation.

descended, - The word translated as "descended" but it means "fell down". This creates a play on words  because this word appears in the Greek before we know what fell down and would assume the house.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

floods  - (WW) The word translated as "floods" means a "river," and similar existing bodies of water. Other than in this verse, this word is always translated as "river" or "stream." In the Greek OT, it is also uses as "river" not flood.

came,  - The word translated as "came" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." See this article.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

winds  - The word translated as "the winds" means both the physical wind and the directions from which the wind comes.

blew,  - The word translated as "blew" primarily means "to blow" and "to breath," and comes from the same root as a common Greek word for "wind", "breath," and "spirit."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

beat  - (CW) The Greek word translated as "beat upon" is different than the verb used in the earlier verse. This verse means "to strike against" or "to stumble upon." This is a different word than the one used here in

upon  -- This is from the prefix of the verb that can "towards" or "against."

that  - The word translated as "that" means specifically "that person." Christ tends to use it, as here, referring to a person mentioned earlier.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

house;  - The Greek word translated as "house," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

fell  - The word translated as "fell" primarily means "to fall" but, like our English word, it has a large number of special uses.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

great  - (WP) The word translated as "great" generally means "large" or "big" but it is best translated according to its context. This word appears at the end of the verse as a final punch line, not here.

was -- The verb "was" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it was."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

fall  - The word translated as "fall" is a metaphor for calamity and death. It is a noun form of the verb used above meaning "to fall". this is the only time this word is used by Jesus. In English, we use "crash" to describe the activity of falling as separate from the results of a fall. This is  which is a different word but related Greek word, used in Mat 24:28.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

it. The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "floods" should be "rivers."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "beat" is not the same word translated as "beat" in the earlier verse.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "house" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "great" doesn't appear here but at the end of the verse.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" should be "the."

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" repeatedly here is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

The -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

rain The word translated as "rain" primarily means "rain" but it also has the sense of irrigation flooding. This appears later in the Greek than in the KJV translation.

came, - (WW) The word translated as "came"means "fell down". This creates a play on words  because this word appears in the Greek before we know what fell down and would assume the house.

down -- This is from the prefix of the previous verb.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more.

streams - The word translated as "streams" means a "river," and similar existing bodies of water. Other than in this verse, this word is always translated as "river" or "stream." In the Greek OT, it is also uses as "river" not flood.

rose,  -  (WW) The word translated as "came" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." See this article.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

winds  - The word translated as "the winds" means both the physical wind and the directions from which the wind comes.

blew,  - The word translated as "blew" primarily means "to blow" and "to breath," and comes from the same root as a common Greek word for "wind", "breath," and "spirit."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

beat - (CW) The Greek word translated as "beat upon" means literally "fall towards" and usually means to "sit by."

against -- This is from the prefix of the verb that can "towards" or "against."

that  - The word translated as "that" means specifically "that person." Christ tends to use it, as here, referring to a person mentioned earlier.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

house;  - The Greek word translated as "house," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

fell  - The word translated as "fell" primarily means "to fall" but, like our English word, it has a large number of special uses.

great .

with -- The Greek word translated as "with" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

untranslated "was"-- (MW) The untranslated word "was" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it was."

a -- (WW) The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

great  - (WP) The word translated as "great" generally means "large" or "big" but it is best translated according to its context. This word appears at the end of the verse as a final punch line, not here.

crash - The word translated as "crash" is a metaphor for calamity and death. It is a noun form of the verb used above meaning "to fall". this is the only time this word is used by Jesus. In English, we use "crash" to describe the activity of falling as separate from the results of a fall. This is  which is a different word but related Greek word, used in Mat 24:28.

untranslated "of it"-- (MW) The untranslated word "of it"  comes from the genitive case of the third-person pronoun that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

NIV Translation Issues: 

10
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "came" should be "fell."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "rose" should be "came."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "beat" is not the same word translated as "beat" in the earlier verse.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "house" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "with" should be "and."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "was" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" should be "the."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "great" doesn't appear here but at the end of the verse.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "of it" is not shown in the English translation.

The Spoken Version: 

“He will be compared to a foolish fellow,” he said, then affecting the voice of a haughty academic.
We laughed at the description as well as the familiar comic voice.
“Who constructed that house of his on that sand,” he continued, pointing down toward the sandy beach below.
Was it a coincidence?
As we looked down, we could see the Distinguished boarding their boat from that beach.
We laughed. The Master wasn’t calling the Distinguished foolish, at least not directly, but his line was a play on the way that they looked down on others.
“That household of his,” he repeated, now indicating the group of students as a household again. He then bent down and scraped up some sandy soil from the speaking area. He held it up to show us and said, “On this sand.”
He again whispered some instructions to his students. Then he took a pinch of sand from his hand and gave it to the short, big-nosed student nearest him.
“Don’t murder!” the man said, holding up his pinch of sand. As he spoke, he gave the student with the wispy beard next to him a little push, as if emphasizing his message.
Then the Master gave a second pinch of sand to the young man with the wispy beard.
“Don’t defile!” the youth said, holding up his pinch. Then he gave the clean-shaven student next to him a little shove.
The Master then gave a third pinch to this clean-shaven student.
“Don’t steal!” the man said, pushing the gangly student on his left.
These pushes were seeming more and more like accusations.
The Master then gave a fourth pinch to the gangly student. He too held it up.
“Don’t lie!” he said, shoving the plump fisherman.
The Master then gave a fifth pinch to the plump fisherman. He too held it up.
“Don’t steal!” the chubby man said, pushing at the young merchant.
The Master then gave a sixth pinch to the merchant with the wine bag.
“Don’t cheat!” said the merchant, pushing the Levite with the white cap.
The Master then gave a final pinch to the Levite.
“Don’t envy!” he said, but he was at the end of the group and had no one to pass the push onto. He looked confused, but then he smiled and pushed both the merchant who had pushed him and the big-nosed fisherman who had started it all.
This started another round of shoving within the group. Each student simply said, “Don’t” as they all kept pushing at their fellows. They were no longer reciting commands or even speaking to us. Their group was being spread apart by their shoves.
As we were laughing at their clowning, the Master whispered some more instructions to them.
A heavier drizzle was falling steadily now.
“And, it came down, the rain,” the Teacher said, continuing his story playfully, gesturing not at the sky but at his pushing students.
We laughed.
The Master nodded at them, signaling that they should speak.
“Obey the ancients,” the stocky, big-nosed fisherman announced to the crowd as he pushed at his fellows.
“Obey the written laws,” cried the one with the wispy beard, shoving the others.
“Obey us,” shouted the clean-shaven student, pushing harder.
Now all of them were simply repeating “Obey!” as they pushed one another.
“And they showed up,” the Teacher continued, again gesturing toward the clean-shaven student, “the floods!”
“An eye for an eye!” the Greek-looking man responded, again pushing his fellows.
“Hate those haters of yours!” the gangly fisherman added, as he shoved back at the others.
“And they blew,” the Teacher continued, still telling his story, “the winds.”
The actual winds were also rising, buffeting those up on the speaker’s mound.
“What shall I eat?” cried the plump student plaintively, pushing his fellows.
“What shall I drink?” complained the merchant with the wine bag, sounding slightly drunken and pushing clumsily.
“What shall I wear?” whined the Levite, affecting an effeminate voice and pushing his fellows more daintily.
We were laughing harder and harder at their clowning.
“And they smashed against that house,” the Teacher said, pushing against the whole group of jostling students. “That one there! And?”
He looked for a moment at his students, who were busily shoving one another and apparently enjoying it. He looked back at us.
We laughed.
Lightning flashed. Thunder rumbled. The wind suddenly died. The drizzle turned into a light shower. It was warm and gentle, not at all unpleasant.
The Master, looking almost reluctant, reached over and gave his students a firm push.
“It fell!” he said simply.
On cue, all the students tumbled down to the muddy ground, rolling down the sides of speaker’s mound. They were like kids playing a game, laughing as they rolled.
We laughed and applauded them all.
Puddles had formed around the speaker’s mound from the rain. The students wrestled each other on the ground, splashing in them.
“And, it was, the crash of it?” the Teacher said, gesturing toward his students splashing at each other. “Huge!”

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Jul 22 2020