Matthew 25:17 And likewise he that [had received] two

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:17 And likewise he that [had received] two, he also gained other two.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

In the same way, the one [having] the two profited another two.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse abbreviates the language of the previous verse, Mat 25:16, and begins a word Christ only uses when repeating scenes in his stories.

The sources we use today do not have the Greek "and" at their beginning.

The adverb translated as "likewise" shows up only in two other stories, the laborers in the vineyard, Mat 20:5, when the estate manager goes again to the marketplace to hire laborers and in the story of the Father asking his two sons to work in the vineyard, Mat 21:30. Note that the verb "traded" in the previous verse, Mat 25:16, also appears in the story. There is a more common way of saying "likewise", but Jesus seems to use this one to emphasize repeated actions so it is used here to describe a repeated line. 

The word translated as "he" is from the Greek article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."

Both "twos" here are from the Greek word for the number two. Both are with adjectives that make them the object of the sentence. However, the first "the two" doesn't have a verb associated with it. The sense is "the two" is an object that "the one" has. This works much better for a spoken verse rather than a written one. t

The word translated as "made" is a different Greek word in today's sources than the KJV source. In the KJV, the word used was the common word for "do" or "make," which we referred to in the definition of "traded", but the better sources we use today has a very different word that means to "make profit," and "gain an advantage." This was a very common word in Greek, but less so in Christ's words. It is used in Luke and Mark for the famous verse "What does it help a man to gain the world and lose his soul."

The word translated as "other" is usually translated as "another" and with numerals means "further" or "more."

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὡσαύτως (adv) "Likewise' is from hōsautōs, which an adverb that means "in like manner," and "just so." It is literally "this the same."

(article sg masc nom) "He" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

τὰ (article pl neut acc) δύο (number) "Two" is from duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

ἐκέρδησεν [uncommon](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Made" is from kepdaino, which means to "gain," "derive profit", "make profit", and "gain advantage."

ἄλλα (adj pl neut nom) "Other" is from allos, which means "another", "one besides", "of another sort", "different", "other than what is true", "as well", "besides," (with numerals: "yet", "still", "further"), "of other sort", "other than what is", "untrue", "unreal", "other than right", "wrong", "bad", "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest", "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

δύο: (number) "Two" is from duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

The Spoken Version: 

"In the same way," he continued moving to follower playing the second servant. "The one, having the two."

The follower held up two fingers on his hand to indicate how much he had.

"Gained another two," the teacher continued. The follower shook his hand with two fingers in the air and when he stopped, it held up four fingers. He smiled and the crowd applauded.

Related Verses: 

Oct 1 2016