Matthew 25:32 And before him shall be gathered all nations:

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:32 And before him shall be gathered all nations: and he shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth [his] sheep from the goats:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Not only will they be brought together before him, all different types of people, but he shall separate them from each other between them as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is a good example of how word meanings are hidden by translation. First, it contains one word that is translated in such a way that you wouldn't know the same word was used twice. It also has a word that is commonly translated one way that is translated here very differently.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." Here, the two are used together to have the "not only...but always" sense.

The Greek word translated as "they will be gathered" means "to bring together." It has many different uses but Christ uses it to mean "bring together."

The word translated as "all" is from the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

The same word is translated as "one" and "another" but it only appears one, not twice. It means "each other."

The word translated as "nations" is almost always "gentiles" in the NT but it doesn't mean non-Jewish or even foreigners. Its primary meaning is "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Its use here is correct and indicative of how Christ always uses it. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. The sense of "different types of people".

"Separated" and "divideth" are both is from a Greek verb which means "to mark off boundaries", "to determine," and "to separate" in the sense of "distinguish" as well as "to banish." "Separate" works best here because the object is sheep and goats.

"Sheep" is Christ's symbol for his followers. The Greek word refers to any domesticated animal and works better if translated simple as "flock" or "herd." The flock follows the shepherd, which is above them. It is also together, a united group.

"Goat" is from a word, meaning "young goat" or "kid", that Christ uses only twice, here and in Luke.

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

συναχθήσονται (verb 3rd pl fut ind pass) "Shall be gathered" is from synago, which means "bring together", "gather together," "pit [two warriors against each other]", "join in one", "unite", "make friends of", "lead with one", "receive", "reconcile", "draw together", "narrow", "contract", "conclude [from premises]", " infer," and "prove." --

ἔμπροσθεν "Before" is from emprosthen, which as an adverb means [of place]"in front of", "before", "forwards," [of time] "before", "of old," and as a preposition, "facing", "opposite", "in front," [of time] beforehand," and [of degree] "preferred before." It also denotes a ranking.

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

πάντα (adj pl neut acc) "All" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." --

τὰ ἔθνη, (noun pl neut nom) "Nations" is from ethnos, which means "a number of people living together", "company", "body of men," "tribe", "a people", "nation," and (later) "foreign, barbarous nations."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀφορίσει (verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "He shall separate" is from aphorizo which means "to mark off boundaries", "to separate", "distinguish", "bring to an end," "finish," "grant as a special gift", "banish", "set apart for rejection," and "distinguish."

αὐτοὺς (adj pl masc acc ) "Them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

ἀπ᾽ "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

ἀλλήλων, [uncommon] (adj pl masc/fem/neut gen ) "One" and "another" is from allelon, which means "one another", "to one another", "mutually," and "reciprocally." This word only appears once in verse.

ὥσπερ "As" is from hosper, which means "the very man who", "the very thing, which", "the same as", "wherefore," and "although." -- The Greek word translated as "as" indicates a match with a person or thing.

ποιμὴν (noun sg masc nom) "Shepherd" is from poimên (poimen), which means "herdsmen", "shepherd," and, generally, "captain," and "chief."

ἀφορίζει (verb 3rd sg pres ind act)"Divideth" is from aphorizo which means "to mark off boundaries", "to separate", "distinguish", "bring to an end," "finish," "grant as a special gift", "banish", "set apart for rejection," and "distinguish."

τὰ πρόβατα (noun pl neut acc) "Sheep" is from probaton, which means any domesticated four-footed animal, "sheep", "cattle", "herds," and "flocks.

ἀπὸ "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

τῶν ἐρίφων, [uncommon] (noun pl masc gen) "Goats" is from eriphos, which means "young goat" and "kid."

The Spoken Version: 

"Not only will they be brought together before him, all different types of people," he said, gesturing to a large, imaginary crowd before them, but he shall separate them from each other, as a shepherd separates..."

At this point he paused, and looked over his followers. They laughed nervously because he was clearly consider who to assign the roles in his story too.

"The sheep," he said, gesturing to the followers who happened to be on his right. then gesturing to the left, he added, "from the goats."

The followers on the right applauded and the ones of the left groaned.

Related Verses: 

Oct 17 2016