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Luke 17:27 They did eat, they drank, they married wives, they were given in marriage,
KJV Verse:

Luke 17:27 They did eat, they drank, they married wives, they were given in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark, and the flood came, and destroyed them all.

Greek Verse:

ΛΟΥΚΑΝ ​17.27 ἤσθιον, ἔπινον, ἐγάμουν, ἐγαμίζοντο, ἄχρι ἧς ἡμέραςεἰσῆλθεν Νῶε εἰς τὴν κιβωτόν,” καὶ ἦλθεν κατακλυσμὸς καὶ ἀπώλεσεν πάντας.

Literal Alternative:

They were eating. They were drinking. They were tmarrying. They were marrying off daughters for themselves. Until the day Noah entered the box, and it came, the flood, and demolished everyone.

Hidden Meaning:

This verse combines what is said in Matthew 24:38  and Matthew 24:39 putting it more succinctly.

The word translated as "they did eat, " is the common word for "eat" but it also means "fret," as we say "something is eating me up."  It is not the word used in Matthew, possibly because these people were not worrying. The form is the past where something continues and doesn't finish. Each of these initial verbs makes a complete sentence in English since they contain the subject.

The only Greek verb used to mean "they drank" is the only word used to refer to drinking. It also means "to celebrate", which could be the sense here. The form is the past where something continues and doesn't finish, "they were drinking". Each of these initial verbs makes a complete sentence in English since they contain the subject.

The Greek word translated as "they married wives" means "to marry" and "to take a wife". The form is the past where something continues and doesn't finish, "they were marrying". Each of these initial verbs makes a complete sentence in English since they contain the subject.

The Greek word translated as "they were given in marriage" is an uncommon form of the same word as above meaning "give a daughter in marriage".  It is not a passive form, but a form in which the subject acts on themselves.  Generally, in the ancient world, the father gave the daughter in marriage, but in Jewish tradition, this was considered a contract, often in writing, where specific rights and responsibilities were transferred from the father to the husband. The husband paid a bride-price to the bride's father, like buying a slave. This was different than the practice in ancient Rome and Greece where a dowry was paid to the groom by the bride's father to the groom, a dowry that was returned, plus interested upon divorce. The form is the past where something continues and doesn't finish "they were marrying off daughters for themselves". Each of these initial verbs makes a complete sentence in English since they contain the subject.

"Until" is from another uncommon word that means "until", but unlike the more common word for "until", it also has the sense of "continually until". This same word is used in the Matthew version despite being very uncommon outside of Luke.

The word that means "day" used above, appears again here but in the singular rather than the play.

"Entered" is from a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."

"The ark" is translated from a Greek word that means a "box", "chest," and "coffer." The Hebrew word translated as "ark" both for the boat Noah built and the papyrus boat of the baby Moses also means "box" or "coffin".

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "the flood" also means "deluge". It is the source of our word "cataclysm". It is only used twice by Jesus, here and in the Matthew version, Matthew 24:39. This uncommon word also unites the two versions.

The word translated as "came" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "perish" means to destroy or demolish.

The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything" when neutral and "everyone" when masculine.

Vocabulary:

ἤσθιον, ( verb 3rd pl imperf ind act) "They did eat" is esthiô (esthio), which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion.

ἔπινον, ( verb 3rd pl imperf ind act ) "They bought" is from pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up."

ἐγάμουν, (verb 3rd pl imperf ind act) "They married wives" is from gameo, which mean "to marry" and "to take a wife." For a woman, it means "to give yourself in marriage." It can also mean to "take a lover".

ἐγαμίζοντο, [uncommon] ( verb 3rd pl imperf ind mp ) "They gave wives in marriage" is from gamizo, which it translated in the Bible as "give [a daughter] in marriage." This word appears nowhere else in Greek classical literature. Normally, "giving in marriage" is another Greek word, ekgamizo.

ἄχρι [uncommon] (prep, adv) "Until" is from achri, which means "until", "continually", "as far is", "so long as", and "as far as."

ἧς ἡμέρας (noun sg fem gen) "The day" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

εἰσῆλθεν ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Entered" is from eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind." --

Νῶε (Hebrew name) "Noah" is from Noe, which is the Greek form of the name of Noah.

εἰς "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν κιβωτόν,” (noun sg fem acc) "Ark" is from kibotos, which means "box", "chest", and "coffer". The Greek word translated from the Hebrew tebah, which means "box" or "coffin".

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἦλθεν ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Came" is erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. 

κατακλυσμὸς [uncommon](noun sg masc nom) "The flood" is from kataklysmos, which means "flood", "inundation", and "deluge".

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

ἀπώλεσεν ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Destroyed" is apollymi, which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone."

πάντας. (adj pl masc acc) "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

Related Verses:

Matthew 24:38 For as in the days that were before the flood

Matthew 24:39 And knew not until the flood came,

Luke 17:28 Likewise also as it was in the days of Lot;