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Luke 15:16 And he would fain have filled his belly with the husk
KJV Verse:

Luke 15:16 And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.

Greek Verse:

ΛΟΥΚΑΝ ​15:16 καὶ ἔπεμψεν αὐτὸν εἰς τοὺς ἀγροὺς αὐτοῦ βόσκειν χοίρους: καὶ ἐπεθύμει χορτασθῆναι ἐκ τῶν κερατίων ὧν ἤσθιον οἱ χοῖροι, καὶ οὐδεὶς ἐδίδου αὐτῷ.

Literal Alternative:

And he yearned to get his fill of the carob pods that they ate, the swine, and no one gave him. 

Hidden Meaning:

The KJV verse is only the second half of the Greek verse here. The first part of the Greek is translated in Luke 15:15.  Some of the humor in this verse was lost because the Greek used to create this verse is different than the Greek we used today. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"He would fain" is a Greek verb that means "to set one's heart upon", "to desire", "to covet," and "to long for." There are simpler words to say "he wanted", but this one is more extreme and humorous. 

The Greek word translated in this version as "have filled his belly" also means "to satisfy" with a close association with the physical satisfaction of eating. Jesus uses a bit a humor here, choosing a word that is usually applied to cattle, specifically the fattening of cattle. The KJV Greek did not use this word but three word meaning "filled his belly". 

The Greek preposition translated as "with" means "out of" or "from."  The Greek of the KJV had a different preposition that also usually means "from" but was translated as "with". 

The Greek noun translated as "husks" means "carob pod", the fruit of the carob tree, a non-fleshy and bean-like seed pod. See picture above. 

The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

The Greek word translated as "swine" primarily means "sow". Of course, the pigs were an unclean animal among the Jews and tending them as bad a profession as a Jew can get. This word is uncommon for Jesus to use in the Gospels. 

The word translated as "did eat" means "eat" but it also means "fret," as we say "something is eating me up," which seems to go better with the "worry" concept earlier.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The Greek word translated as "nothing" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

The verb translated as "gave" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

The word translated as "unto him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. 

Vocabulary:

The first part of the Greek of this verse is translated in the KJV in the previous verse and analyzed in the article on  Luke 15:15. Vocabulary in provided here for completeness. 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἔπεμψεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "He sent" is pempo, which means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort."

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." 

τοὺς ἀγροὺς (noun pl masc acc) "Fields" is agros, which means "field", "lands," or "country."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

βόσκειν [uncommon](verb pres inf act ) "Feed" is bosko, which means to "feed", "tend", generally, "feed", "nourish", of cattle, "feed", and "graze".

 χοίρους: [uncommon](noun pl masc/fem acc) "Swine" is from choiroswhich means "sow", "young pig", "porker", "swine," and slang for the female sex organ.

The vocabulary for the KJV of this verse starts here.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ἐπεθύμει (verb 3rd sg imperf ind act) "He would fain" is epithymeo, which means "to set one's heart upon", "to desire", "to covet," and "to long for."

χορτασθῆναι (verb aor inf pass) "Have filled his belly" is from chortazo, which means "feed", "feast", "fatten" and "to eat their fill." It is a term most commonly used for cattle.

ἐκ (prep) "With" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from." -

τῶν κερατίων [unique](noun pl fem gen) "Husks" is keration, which means "carob", the fruit of the carob tree, a non-fleshy and bean-like seed pod. 

ὧν (pron pl fem gen) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. --

ἤσθιον (verb 3rd pl imperf ind act) "Did eat" is esthiô (esthio), which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion. 

οἱ χοῖροι,  [uncommon](noun pl masc/fem nom) "The swine" is from choiroswhich means "sow", "young pig", "porker", "swine," and slang for the female sex organ.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

οὐδεὶς () "No man" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

ἐδίδου (verb 3rd sg imperf ind act) "Gave" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." 

αὐτῷ. (adj sg masc dat) "Unto him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

Related Verses:

Luke 15:15 And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country;

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