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Luke 20:36 Neither can they die any more: for they are equal unto the angels;
KJV Verse:

Luke 20:36 Neither can they die any more: for they are equal unto the angels; and are the children of God, being the children of the resurrection.

Greek Verse:

ΛΟΥΚΑΝ20:36  οὐδὲ γὰρ ἀποθανεῖν ἔτι δύνανται, ἰσάγγελοι γάρ εἰσιν, καὶ υἱοί εἰσιν θεοῦ τῆς ἀναστάσεως υἱοὶ ὄντες.

Literal Alternative:

Not at all, consequently, to die no longer do they have the power, like messengers, because they are as sons. They are of divinity, of the awakening, sons existing.

Hidden Meaning:

There are a couple of important words here that are not translated. These words may reverse the meaning of the KJV. Because of the differences in word order, this is a very hard version to construct in English.  See the alternative version above for the sense of how it works in Greek.

The Greek word for "neither" is an adverb that means "not at all" or "no even". As a conjunction, it works as both parts of the "neither/nor" constructions.  The previous verse had a neither/nor construction and this seems to continue it, except for the next word, which is untranslated in the KJV.

The untranslated word introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause". 

The word translated as  "can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility, but that is not the case in Greek. In Greek, it indicates having an ability or power. Its noun form is the word that means "power" and "authority".

"They die" is a Greek verb that means "to die" and "to die off", but it's form is an infinitive "to die". This form goes with the verb "can", which really has the sense of "have the power to die".

"Any more" is an adverb that means "yet" and "still", "already",  "longer", "no longer" (with a negative), "still" and "besides".  The sense is "no longer". This is one of those situations where a single Greek negative requires two negatives in English.

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause".  This was the word untranslated in the previous verse.

The verb "they are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

"Equal unto the angels" is an invented word, appearing only once in ancient Greek, here in the Gospels. It means "like an angel". It is created from isos, which means "equal" in size, strength, number, or rights and aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoys". This phrase actually appears in previous clause, not in this one. We know this because the position of the "for" (see above) indicates the start of the clause.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as". Because of its position in the verse a "also" or "as" works better because the word doesn't join words, phrases, or clauses in any clear way.

The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. The form is the same as above, but the verb comes before the "and" so these verbs are not joined that conjunction. This word starts a new clause, "they are".

The word translated as "the children" means :"son" and more generally "child" or "children". It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. More about it in this article. It is not introduced by an article so "children" not "the children"

The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is not introduced by an article, which is how Jesus used it when referring to the one God. Instead, this has the sense of "divinity."

The verb "isbeing here is the common form of "to be" in Greek, but the form is that of an adjective modifying "children" below, so "existing" or "being" or "existent".

The word translated as "the children" means :"son" and more generally "child" or "children". Again, it is not introduced by an article so "children" not "the children"

. While the Greek word translated as "of the resurrection" is understood that way today, during Christ's time, it would have meant simply "a rising up" or "awakening." It was used to indicate someone standing up especially when awakening from sleep.

Vocabulary:

οὐδὲ (partic) "Neither" is oude, which, as a conjunction, means "but not", "neither", and "nor." As an adverb, it means "not at all" and "not even."--

γὰρ (partic)  Untranslated is gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

ἀποθανεῖν ( verb aor inf act ) "They die" is from apothnesko, which means "to die" and "to die off."

ἔτι (adv) "Any more" is eti, which means "yet" and "still" (with the Present), "already" (with the Past), "yet" and "longer" (with the Future), "no longer" (with a negative), and"still" and "besides" (of degree). -- 

δύνανται, ( verb 3rd pl pres ind mp ) "Can" is the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

ἰσάγγελοι [unique]( adj pl masc nom) "Equal unto angels" is isaggelos, which means "like an angel". It is an invented word from isos, which means "equal" in size, strength, number, or rights and aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoys".

γάρ (partic)  "For" is gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

εἰσιν, ( verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "They are" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

υἱοί ( noun pl masc nom ) "The children" is huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant. --

εἰσιν ( verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

θεοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Of God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity."

τῆς ἀναστάσεως (noun sg fem gen) "Resurrection" is from anastasis, which means, "a standing up", "removal", "a rising up", "a setting up," and "rising from a seat." It is the noun form ofanistêmi, which means "to make stand up", "to raise", "to wake up", "to build up", "to restore", "to rouse to action", "to stir up," and "to make people rise."

υἱοὶ ( noun pl masc nom ) "The children" is huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant. -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "children". It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Jesus also used it metaphorically to describe those who follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

ὄντες. ( part pl pres act masc nom ) "Being" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

Most Recent Question

Question:
What does "Pay the uttermost farthing" mean in historical and clear context?
Answer:

You can see a fairly complete explanation of the Greek here: Matthew 5:26 ...Thou shalt by no means come out thence.

But to answer your question directly, we would say, “the last penny” today.

τὸν...

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