Luke 14:21 So that servant came, and shewed his lord these things.

KJV Verse: 

 

Luke 14:21 So that servant came, and shewed his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And coming to his side the slave reported to that lord of his these things, then being provoked, the householder said to that slave of his, "Go out speedily into the broadways and rush of the city and the beggars, and mutilated and blind and lame take in here. 

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse has so many uncommon words for Jesus, a couple of them appearing for the first time in the NT, that it may be a record. It repeats many of the same words seen in Luke 14:13 for the first time. This verse also changes the story from the version in Matthew, making it conform to the earlier lesson. 

The Greek word translated as "so" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The noun translated as "that servant" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible. There is no "that" but the Greek article ("the") is more like "this" and "that" than the English article. 

"Came" is a Greek verb that Jesus first uses here that means "to be beside, by, or near", "come to one's side", "standby", "second", "come", and "arrive". The form is not an active verb but an adjective, "coming to his side". 

 Though the word translated as "shewed" is in the expected form of a command, it has the specific meaning of bringing someone news or explaining a dream or a riddle or, in this case, miracles. It is the verb form of the Greek word we translated as "angel", which actually means "messenger". Its prefix means "away from" or "out" so the literal meaning is "send a message out". "Report" fits best here. 

The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

The word translated as "lord" is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

The "these things" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. It is plural, neutral, which converts to "these things".

The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then". 

"The master of the house" is from a compound Greek word that is literally the "master of the house." It can be translated as "householder."

"Being angry" is from a Greek verb that means "to be made angry", "to be provoked to anger," and "to be irritated."  It is a form of the word meaning "becoming". The form is an adjective, "becoming angry" is closer. 

"Said" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

The noun translated as "servant" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible.

The word translated as "Go out" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true."

"Quickly" is an adverb used for the first time here by Jesus that means "quickly", or "speedily".

The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

The Greek word translated as "the streets" is a noun from the adjective that means "broad". The sense is "broadways" in English. 

The Greek word translated as "lanes" is not a simple word for street. Its primary meaning is the "force" and "rush" of a body of moving people. It means "lanes" in the sense that they hold these people.

The Greek word for "of the city" means not only a city but a nation, culture, or a society. It worked something like the word "community" today.

"Bring in" is another uncommon word, use by Jesus the first time here, that  means "lead in"  esp. into one's dwelling, "introduce",  "take in with one", "introduce into", "to lead" a wife into one's house, "introduce" a child, "introduce new customs", "bring in", "bring forward" esp. on the stage, "introduce to" a subject, and instruct".

"Hither" is the demonstrative pronoun which means "this" in the sense of "what is present" and "what can be seen." With verbs of action and with a person (its use here), it means "here" as in "here I am" in the sense of "I am present."

"The poor" is an adjective that means "a beggar" and "beggarly" and it a metaphor for being lacking in something. It doesn't have an article "the" on it. 

The fun word here is translated as "maimed", which is almost the Greek adjective that means "maimed" or "mutilated" but which is actually the Greek verb meaning "you multiply by infinity". It seems like a play on words as a side comment about the poor.  The Greek adjective meaning "maimed", unlike the other adjectives here, has no double meaning so it seems Jesus is adding one for it. 

"The halt" is a word that means both "limping" and 'defective." It is a near sound-alike for a word meaning "bitter". It has no article "the" before it. In the Greek, this comes after "blind" not before. This word order copies that in Luke 14:13 that uses these same words. 

"The blind" is a word that means both physically and mentally blind. It also means all things that are obscure. It has no article "the" before it.

the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

 

 

 

Wordplay: 

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "So" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

παραγενόμενος [uncommon](part sg aor mid masc nom) "Came" is from paraginomai, which means "to be beside, by, or near", "come to one's side", "stand by", "second", "come", and "arrive".  -- 

δοῦλος (noun sg masc nom) "The servant" is doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave."

ἀπήγγειλεν [uncommon](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Shewed" is from apaggello, which means to "bring tidings", "report", "describe," and "explain or interpret (a dream or riddle)". From, aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoy" and which is the word from which we get "angels." 

τῷ κυρίῳ (noun sg masc dat) "Lord" is kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." 

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

ταῦτα. (adj pl neut acc ) "These things" is tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." 

τότε (adv) "Then" is tote, which means "at that time" and "then." 

ὀργισθεὶς [uncommon] (part sg aor pass masc nom) "Being angry" is orgizo, which means "to be made angry", "to be provoked to anger," and "to be irritated." --

οἰκοδεσπότης (noun sg masc gen) "Master of the house" is from oikodespotês , which is the "master of the house" and also means "steward of a house," and "native ruler." It is a combination of two words. The first part is from oikia, which means "building", "house", "family," and "household," and the second is despotes, which means "master" and "lord" but it isn't the word normally translated as "lord" in the Gospels. 

εἶπεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "I have called" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." 

τῷ δούλῳ (noun sg masc dat) "The servant" is doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave." --

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

Ἔξελθε (verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Go out" is exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true." 

ταχέως [uncommon](adv) "Quickly" is tacheos which means "quickly", or "speedily".

 εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." 

τὰς πλατείας (noun pl fem acc) "The streets" is plateia, which is an adjective that means "wide", "broad", "over a wide area", "broad shouldered [of a man]", "far advanced [of seasons]", "strong [oath]", "widespread", "flat of the hand", "frequent," and "street."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ῥύμας (noun pl fem acc) "The streets" is rhyme, which means "force", "swing", "rush [of a body in motion]", "rush", "charge [of soldiers]", "street", "lane," and "alley." 

τῆς πόλεως, (noun sg fem gen ) "City" is polis, which means "city", "citadel", "one's city", "one's country", "community", "state", "state affairs," and "civic duties." 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

τοὺς πτωχοὺς (adj pl masc/fem acc) "Poor" is ptochos, which means "beggar", "beggar-woman," and "beggarly."  

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀναπείρους  (ἀναπήρους) [uncommon](adj pl masc/fem acc) "The maimed" is assumed to be anaperoswhich means "maimed", and "mutilated", but the actual word in Greek is apeipoo, (verb 2nd sg pres ind act) which is a verb meaning "multiply to infinity". 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τυφλοὺς (adj pl masc nom) Blind" is from typhloswhich means "blind", "lacking vision of the future," [of things]"dim", "obscure", "dark," [of passages] "blind", "enclosed", "with no outlet," and is a metaphor for lacking sense." 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

χωλοὺς (adj pl masc nom) "The halt" is from chôlos, which means "lame", "limping," and "defective." A very similar word, cholos, which means "gall", "bitter", "angry," and "wrathful."  -- 

εἰσάγαγε [uncommon](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Bring in" is eisagōwhich means "lead in"  esp. into one's dwelling, "introduce",  "take in with one", "introduce into", "to lead" a wife into one's house, "introduce" a child, "introduce new customs", "bring in", "bring forward" esp. on the stage, "introduce to" a subject, and instruct".

ὧδε. (pron) "Hither" is hode, the demonstrative pronoun which means "this" in the sense of "what is present" and "what can be seen." With verbs of action and with a person (its use here), it means "here" as in "here I am" in the sense of "I am present."

Related Verses: 

Jun 25 2018