John 10:14 I am the good shepherd,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

I am a leader, a wonderful one. Not only do I> learn to recognize mine, but mine also learn to recognize me. >

KJV : 

Jhn 10:14 I am the good shepherd, and know my sheep, and am known of mine.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

We continue the "real" meaning began with the "verily, verily" phrase in Jhn 10:7.

The initial phrase "I am the good shepherd" repeats the statement made previously in Jhn 10:11, but now the idea is not an extension of the claim of being the "door" but a contrast with the hireling in the previous verses, Jhn 10:13 and Jhn 10:12.

Notice that the Greek for this verse doesn't mention sheep here at all. The source used by the KFV translators didn't either. The word was inserted by the translators, but that takes use further from what Christ is saying about reality. Sheep are a metaphor for his "flock." Here, he just says "mine." The point is to make the relationships between Christ as a leader and his followers clear.

The word translated as "know" is often translated in the NT as "see" as well as "know." It means "to know" in the same sense that we use "to see" to mean "to known. It means a dawning awareness, that is, learning to see or learning to know.

This verse generally extends the idea that both the leader and his followers learn to recognize each other. This clarifies the earlier verse about followers recognizing the sound of a leader in Jhn 10:4. How Christ sounds in a clearly on the minds of even his challenges. When his challengers debate whether Christ is crazy or "possessed by a devil," as they saw it, one of them often seems to question that, saying that Christ doesn't sound like someone who is crazy even if you don't understand his words.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἐγώ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

εἰμι (1st sg pres ind act) "Am" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ποιμὴν , "Shepherd" is from poimên (poimen), which means "herdsmen", "shepherd," and, generally, "captain," and "chief."

καλός "Good" is from kalos (kalos), which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

γινώσκω (1st sg pres ind act ) "Know," is from gignôskô (ginosko) which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation", "discern", "distinguish", "recognize", "form a judgment", "know carnally", "make known", "celebrate", "understand," and "to perceive."

τὰ ἐμὰ "My sheep" is from emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

γινώσκουσί (3rd pl pres ind act) "Know," is from gignôskô (ginosko) which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation", "discern", "distinguish", "recognize", "form a judgment", "know carnally", "make known", "celebrate", "understand," and "to perceive."

με Untranslated is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

τὰ ἐμά,"Of mine" is from emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me."