John 14:6 I am the way

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

I myself am the way, the truth, and the life. No one shows up before the Father except through  me.

KJV : 

John 14:6 I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The word translated as "truth" literally means "unhidden." It has a negative prefix before the word that means "hidden." In Matthew 6:6, Jesus describes the Father as "hidden." The Father is the unseen, hidden, as is the entire Realm of the Spiritual.  Jesus is the visible Son of God, in our realm. This is why this statement leads to a whole discussion about seeing the Father in the following verses. In the next verse, Jesus states that the way to see the Father is by seeing him. (More about the secrets in that verse next).

In the previous verse, Christ tells us that we can see a path by following him. Here, he takes the idea one step further, describing himself as a path.

NIV : 

John 14:6 I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.

NLT : 

John 14:6 I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one can come to the Father except through me.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἐγὼ (pron 1st sg nom) "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun.

εἰμι (verb 1st sg pres act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." 

(article sg fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ὁδόν (noun sg masc nom) "The way" is from hodos (hodos), which means literally "the way" or "the road" but which is used symbolically to mean "a way of doing things" or "a philosophy of life." It is interesting that a term joining a path with philosophy exists in many languages from the west to the east.

(article sg fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἀλήθεια (noun sg fem nom) "Truth" is aletheia, which means literally "the state of not being hidden," means "truth" and "reality" as opposed to appearances.

καὶ "(conj) And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but."

(article sg fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ζωή:  (noun sg fem nom) "Life" is zoe, which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death. See this article on this and related words.

οὐδεὶς "No man" is from oudeis, (oudeis) which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

ἔρχεται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Comes" is from erchomai, which means to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

πρὸς (prep) "Unto" is pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before."

τὸν (article sg masc acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πατέρα (noun sg masc acc ) "The Father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." 

εἰ μὴ -- "But" is from ei me, which is the conjunction that means "if not", "but," and "except." εἰ is the particle use with the imperative usually to express conditions "if" or indirect questions, "whether." (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no."

δι "By" is dia, which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by", "among," and "between."

ἐμοῦ "Me" is from emou, which means "me", and "mine".

KJV Analysis: 

I -- (CW) The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

am -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

way, -- "The way" is from a word meaning "the way" or "the road" but which is used symbolically to mean "a way of doing things" or "a philosophy of life." In Acts, followers of Jesus are described as those "belonging to the way". 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

truth, -- "Truth" is a noun that means literally "the state of not being hidden." It  means "truth" and "reality" as opposed to appearances. The opposite of a lie. Interestingly, this word is found only in Jesus's words in John except for on in Luke 4:25, where Jesus says "To tell you the truth."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life: -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life.

no man -- The Greek word translated as "no man" also means "no one," "nothing," and other negatives nouns.

cometh -- The word translated as "cometh" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas.   More about this word in this article. 

unto -- The word translated as "unto" means "towards", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "by reason of (for)," and "against."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father, -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

but - (CW) Two Greek words are translated as "but". Literally, they mean "if not" but this phrase is used to mean "except", "instead", and "but."   This is not one of the two Greek words usually translated as "but," and Jesus usually uses it to mean "except."

by  -- The word translated as "by" means "through," in the midst of," "in a line (movement)", or "by (a cause)." Since the verb describes movement, "in a line" works. This could be a play on words with his description of himself as a "door" in John 10:9.

me. --  "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form which, when used with a preposition, indicates motion into or out of something.

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "I" is added to the verb here to give the sense of "I myself."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "but" is not one of the two common forms of "but" and is more like "except."

NIV Analysis: 

I -- (CW) The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

am -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

way, -- "The way" is from a word meaning "the way" or "the road" but which is used symbolically to mean "a way of doing things" or "a philosophy of life." In Acts, followers of Jesus are described as those "belonging to the way". 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

truth, -- "Truth" is a noun that means literally "the state of not being hidden." It  means "truth" and "reality" as opposed to appearances. The opposite of a lie. Interestingly, this word is found only in Jesus's words in John except for on in Luke 4:25, where Jesus says "To tell you the truth."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life: -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life.

No one -- The Greek word translated as "no on" also means "nothing," and other negatives nouns.

comes -- The word translated as "comes" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas.   More about this word in this article. 

to -- The word translated as "unto" means "towards", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "by reason of (for)," and "against."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father, -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

except - Two Greek words are translated as "except". Literally, they mean "if not" but this phrase is used to mean "except", "instead", and "but."  

through -- The word translated as "through" means "through," in the midst of," "in a line (movement)", or "by (a cause)." Since the verb describes movement, "in a line" works. This could be a play on words with his description of himself as a "door" in John 10:9.

me. --  "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form which, when used with a preposition, indicates motion into or out of something.

NIV Translation Issues: 

3
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "I" is added to the verb here to give the sense of "I myself."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" doesn't exist before "way" in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "the" doesn't exist before "truth" in the source.

NLT Analysis: 

No one come to the Father except through me.

I -- (CW) The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

am -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

way, -- "The way" is from a word meaning "the way" or "the road" but which is used symbolically to mean "a way of doing things" or "a philosophy of life." In Acts, followers of Jesus are described as those "belonging to the way". 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

truth, -- "Truth" is a noun that means literally "the state of not being hidden." It  means "truth" and "reality" as opposed to appearances. The opposite of a lie. Interestingly, this word is found only in Jesus's words in John except for on in Luke 4:25, where Jesus says "To tell you the truth."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life: -- The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Jesus uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life.

No one -- The Greek word translated as "no on" also means "nothing," and other negatives nouns.

can -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "can" in the Greek source.

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas.   More about this word in this article. 

to -- The word translated as "unto" means "towards", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "by reason of (for)," and "against."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Father, -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

except - Two Greek words are translated as "except". Literally, they mean "if not" but this phrase is used to mean "except", "instead", and "but."  

through -- The word translated as "through" means "through," in the midst of," "in a line (movement)", or "by (a cause)." Since the verb describes movement, "in a line" works. This could be a play on words with his description of himself as a "door" in John 10:9.

me. --  "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form which, when used with a preposition, indicates motion into or out of something.

NLT Translation Issues: 

4
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "I" is added to the verb here to give the sense of "I myself."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "can" doesn't exist before "come" in the source.