John 14:7 If ye had known me,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

If you have recognized me, you also should have perceived the Father. From now on you recognize him as you have seen [me] with your eyes.

KJV : 

Jhn 14:7 If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In the previous verse, Christ describes himself as the "unhidden" (the word translated as "truth"). This leads to this verse, which invokes not one but two different types of "seeing."

Again, Bible translators insist on translating many different Greek words as the same English word, perhaps to simplify the text, but it doing so, we lose much of the text's meaning.

In two previous verse, the KJV translated two very different Greek words as "go" (as I explain here). In this verse, we run into two word that appear the same as those used in earlier verses but are not. Two different Greek words are translated as "know" and the one used in this verse is not the same as the word used two verses ago. Two other Greek words are used other different words as "to see." Interestingly, one word translated as "know" ALSO means "see."

It makes more sense to think that when two different Greek words of similar meanings are used, the purpose, as in any language, is to emphasize their differences in meaning, not their similarities.

First, let us look at the two different types of seeing referenced in this verse. The first is oida, which is translated in KJV as "should have known" referring to the Father. It is not the same as the verb translated as "know" in the initial clause, which is ginosko. Though oida CAN mean "know" (and has been translated that way in previous verses), its primary meaning is "see," but it is a different Greek verb than the one translated in the final phrase as "see". That final is horaô, which specifically means to "see with the eyes" whereas oida means "to see" in the sense of perceive or understand or "to see with the mind's eye."

I have chosen to translate "ginosko" as "recognize" in the two places it occurs here. This clarifies when that verb is used, separating it from the use of oida. "Recognize" also captures the concept of the verb, which is learning to know something. This learning can be either by contemplation or by observation. The focus here is obviously on observation.

Christ is saying that the apostles have learned to know him, Christ, and therefore, they have learned to perceive the Father, not with their eyes, but their mind. Here, I have translated oida, the first Greek "see" as "perceive."

Christ goes on to say that, from now on, they can recognize the Father having seen Christ with their eyes.

This last part seems IMAO badly messed up in KJV and most other translations. It makes no sense to say that the apostles have seen the Father with their eyes. Why use this specific verb if that was its meaning?

Christ just referred to himself as "the unhidden" contrasting himself with the Father who is hidden. The verb CHANGES to clarify this idea of physical seeing, from oida (mental seeing) to horao (physical seeing). The two verbs ginosko and horao also change tense in this final clause to clarify their separate objects. Ginosko is in the present tense while horao is in the pluperfect (past) tense. The apostles recognize the Father mentally in the present having seen Christ physically in the past.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

εἰ "If" is from ei, which is the particle use with the imperative usually to express conditions "if" or indirect questions, "whether."

ἐγνώκειτέ "Ye had known," is from gignôskô (ginosko) which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive." (pluperfect form)

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πατρός "Father" is from pater (pater), which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

ἂν "Should" is from an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

ἤδειτε "Have known" is oida which is a form of eido, (eido) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

Ἀπὸ "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

ἄρτι "Henceforth" is arti, which means "just", "exactly," and "just now."

γινώσκετε "Ye know," is from gignôskô (ginosko) which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive." (present form)

αὐτῷ "Him" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἑωράκατε "Have seen him" is from horaô (horao), which means "to see with the eyes", "to look," and "to observe."