Luke 13:8 And he answering said unto him, Lord, let it alone this year also

Spoken to: 

audience

After saying that those the suffer tragedies are not worse "sinners" than others, that we are all the same, none owing more than another. And he began this analogy about the unproductive fig tree who the master wants cut down.

KJV: 

Luke 13:8 And he answering said unto him, Lord, let it alone this year also, till I shall dig about it, and dung it:

NIV : 

Luke 13:8 “ ‘Sir,’ the man replied, ‘leave it alone for one more year, and I’ll dig around it and fertilize it.

LISTENERS HEARD: 

The one, however, answering says to him, "Master, Leave it there just this year until this: I dig all around it and toss it manure. 

MY TAKE: 

We are only given so much time to deal with the stuff that happens.

GREEK (Each Word Explained Bottom of Page): 

Luke 13:8 ὁ δὲ ἀποκριθεὶς λέγει αὐτῷ Κύριε ἄφες αὐτὴν καὶ τοῦτο τὸ ἔτος ἕως ὅτου σκάψω περὶ αὐτὴν καὶ βάλω κόπριαν,

GREEK ORDER: 

ὁ             δὲ            ἀποκριθεὶς λέγει αὐτῷ      Κύριε   ἄφες   αὐτὴν καὶ τοῦτο τὸ   ἔτος  ἕως  ὅτου
The one, however, answering says    to him, "Master, Leave it      just  there this year   until this:

σκάψω περ     ὶ αὐτὴν καὶ βάλω    κόπριαν,
I dig     around it         and toss  it manure. 

LOST IN TRANSLATION: 

This is where this parable becomes more clearly comical. In the previous two verses, punchlines and many references to the male and female roles in productivity, or, in this case, the lack of productivity, the barren tree. Here, the punchline is the simply, "throw manure" or more crudely, "toss shit." The Greek word for "toss" is one Jesus often uses in a lighthearted way to signal a lighthearted meaning. There is a sense that we are given challenges in order to use them productively.

The verse is translated sloppily, missing many key words in both the KJV and NIV. However, Jesus does make the beginning of the verse rather convoluted,

# KJV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

5

And(WW) he (CW)answering said unto him, Lord, let it alone this(CW) year also, till  (MWthis) I shall(WT) dig about it, and dung it:

  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" should be something more like "but."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This is not the common word usually translated as "he."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- The "this" should be either "here" or "there" in most situations.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "this"  after "till" is not shown in the English
  • WT --Wrong Tense - The tense of this verb is not the future tense.

# NIV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

13

(MWbut) ‘Sir,’ the man(IW) replied(WF) (MWsaid) (MWto him), ‘leave it alone [for one more](IP3) year,  [MP2until this] and I’ll dig around it and fertilize it.

  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "but"  at the beginning is not shown in the English translation. 
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "man " doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "answering."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "said"  after "replied" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "to him"  after "word" is not shown in the English translation. 
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The "for one more" doesn't exist in the source. This is counted as 3 translation issues, not 1.
  • MP - Missing Phrase - The phrase "until this"  exists in the source. This is counted as  2 translation issues, not 1. 
  • WT --Wrong Tense - The tense of this verb is not the future tense.

EACH WORD of KJV : 

And -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" means "but," "yet," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

he --  (CW) The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.  This is not the word usually translated as "he."

answering -- "Answering" is from a verb that means to "set apart," "choose," "answer" a question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself." In the passive, it means "to be parted or separated" or "give answer to" a question.  In the Gospels, it is always translated as "answered."

said -- The word translated as "said" is the most common word that means "to say," "to tell," and "to speak,"  but when used with an objective noun or pronoun, the sense is "say of" or "speak of."    It also has many

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the indirect object form of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English. The most common is a "to" for the English indirect object. However, the translator can choose other prepositions: "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at," or "on" depending on the context.

him, --  The word translated as "him" is the Greek adjective that acts like our third-person,  indirect object pronoun.

Lord, -- The word translated as "lord" means "lord," "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific term for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief." For the sake of consistency, this should be the Greek word translated as "master."

let -- " The word translated as "let" primarily means "to let go," "to leave," "let loose," or "to send away."  It can also mean "remit" a debt or "excuse" a fault. It has the sense of leaving something alone and letting it drop. See this article for more.

it -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context.

alone -- The word translated as "alone" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context. It also means "by oneself" or "alone."

this -- -- (CW) The word translated as "this" means "from here" "from there" or "this/that thing/person here/there." As a pronoun by itself, it means "this here" but it can be shortened to just "this."  The Bible usually translates it as the adjective "this" when it appears after words modifying them, which is confusing because the definite article, with which it is often used before the word, also can mean "this." It works better as "here," which is how Jesus usually uses it, but it can also mean "there." It often comes after the noun, emphasizing it, "this thing here." 

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more.

year -"Year" is from a Greek word that means "year", "yearly", and "annually". It is also an uncommon word, used primarily by Luke.

also, -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis.Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

till -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "till," "while," "as long as," "as far as," "up to the point," "in order that."

missing "this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  translation. "this" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer,  "here," or "there."  It often  follows the noun to further identify it as the one "here" or there."  Referring to time, it means "which time." When preceded by a definite article that also functions as a "this," this word more clearly means "here."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- (WT) This "shall" indicates the future tense, but this tense of this verb is the "at some time."

dig -- The verb translated as "dig" means to "dig", "delve" and "cultivate by digging".is from skapto, which means "dig", "delve", " dig about", and "cultivate by digging".  -- The verb translated as "digged" means to "dig", "delve" and "cultivate by digging".

about - The Greek word translated as "about" means "around" when referring to a place, but in referring to a subject, it means "about," "concerning," "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Jesus usually uses it.

it, -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis.

dung -- This is from two words meaning "toss dung." The word translated as "toss" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." It is a word that Jesus frequently uses in a lighthearted way.  See this article about a related word. This word for "dung" means "dunghill", "rubbish-heap", "dung", "muck", and "manure". Less politely, it means "shit."

it:-- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences.

EACH WORD of NIV : 

missing "but"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "but" means "but," "yet," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

‘Sir,’ -- The word translated as "lord" means "lord," "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific term for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief." For the sake of consistency, this should be the Greek word translated as "master."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more. 

man -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

replied, -- (WF) "Replied" is from a verb that means to "set apart," "choose," "answer" a question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself." In the passive, it means "to be parted or separated" or "give answer to" a question.  In the Gospels, it is always translated as "answered." This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "answering."

answering -- "Answering" is from a verb that means to "set apart," "choose," "answer" a question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself." In the passive, it means "to be parted or separated" or "give answer to" a question.  In the Gospels, it is always translated as "answered."

missing "said"  -- (MW) The untranslated word  '"said" is the most common word that means "to say," "to tell," and "to speak,"  but when used with an objective noun or pronoun, the sense is "say of" or "speak of."    It also has many

missing "to him"  "to him" is the Greek adjective that acts like our third-person,  indirect object pronoun.

leave -- " The word translated as "let" primarily means "to let go," "to leave," "let loose," or "to send away."  It can also mean "remit" a debt or "excuse" a fault. It has the sense of leaving something alone and letting it drop. See this article for more.

it -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context.

alone -- The word translated as "alone" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context. It also means "by oneself" or "alone."

for one more -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as this phrase in the Greek source.

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more.

year -"Year" is from a Greek word that means "year", "yearly", and "annually". It is also an uncommon word, used primarily by Luke.

missing "until which time"  -- -- (MP) The words here aren't translated with their correct meanings and forms. The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "till," "while," "as long as," "as far as," "up to the point," "in order that." The untranslated word  translation. "this" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer,  "here," or "there."  It often  follows the noun to further identify it as the one "here" or there."  When preceded by a definite article that also functions as a "this," this word more clearly means "here."

and, -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis.Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

’ll-- (WT) This "will" indicates the future tense, but this tense of this verb is the "at some time."

dig -- The verb translated as "dig" means to "dig", "delve" and "cultivate by digging".is from skapto, which means "dig", "delve", " dig about", and "cultivate by digging".  -- The verb translated as "digged" means to "dig", "delve" and "cultivate by digging".

around - The Greek word translated as "about" means "around" when referring to a place, but in referring to a subject, it means "about," "concerning," "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Jesus usually uses it.

it, -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of a singular object of a verb or preposition. It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis.

fertilize -- This is from two words meaning "toss dung." The word translated as "toss" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." It is a word that Jesus frequently uses in a lighthearted way.  See this article about a related word. This word for "dung" means "dunghill", "rubbish-heap", "dung", "muck", and "manure". Less politely, it means "shit."

it:-- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences.

COMPARISON: GREEK to KJV : 

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "He" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").   It usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. When not preceding a a word that can become a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." 

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "But" is de which means "but," "yet," "however," and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be an explanation of an indirect cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). In an  "if" (εἰ) clause or temporal "when" (ὅταν) clause the sense is "if/when... then." In a series begun by men, it means "on the other hand." In a listing, the sense is "then" or "yet." After an interruption, "so then." It can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").  When used with a conditional starting a clause, the sense is "if/when...then." When used with a particle meaning "indeed" the sense is "on one hand...on the other hand." In a listing, the sense is "then" or "yet." After an interruption, "so then."

ἀποκριθεὶς [17 verses](part sg aor pass masc nom) "Answering" is from apokrinomai that means to "set apart," "choose," "exclude," "reject on examination," "decide," "answer" the question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself" and, in the passive, "to be parted or separated." In the passive, it means "to be parted or separated" or "give answer to" a question.

λέγει [264 verses](verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Said" is lego, which means "to recount," "to tell over," "to say," "to speak," "to teach," "to mean," "boast of," "tell of," "recite," nominate," and "command." When used with an object is has the sense of "call by name."  It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself," "pick up," "gather," "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay," "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." This word is more about making a statement than participating in a discussion. Translating is as "stated" might distinguish it better. When two accusative objects are used, the sense is  "say of him this," or "call him this." The form Jesus uses to describe his own speaking can be either indicative, "I say/tell" or subjunctive, "I should/could say/tell."ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself."

αὐτῷ [106 verses](pron/adj sg masc/neut dat) "Unto him" is  is auto, the dative case of the third-person, singular adjective that is used as a pronoun. The word also means "the same,""one's true self," and "the soul" as opposed to the body. It also means "of one's own accord." The form is the third person, plural as an indirect object of the verb or the object of a preposition.  When used as a noun, it is preceded by a definite article, and it means "the same."A dative object of a preposition implies no movement but in a fixed position. With the "to be," it acts as a possessive, "his."

Κύριε, [92 verses] (noun sg masc voc) "Lord" is kyrios, which means "having power," "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord," "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific term for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Jesus, even though he had no formal authority. It was also the term used for the name of God in the Old Testament. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief." For the sake of consistency, this should be the Greek word translated as "master" for humans and "Lord" for the Old Testament usage.

Ἄφες [73 verses](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Let" is aphiemi, which means "to let fall," "to send away," "give up," "hand over," "to let loose," "set free," "to get rid of," "to leave alone," "to pass by," "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." The dative is the person it is left to. The accusative object is what is left, given away, etc. It can also mean to "remit" a debt or "excuse" a fault. With an accusative person as an object and an infinite, it means "to permit one." A genitive object is a thing "let go of."

αὐτὴν [39 verses](adj sg fem acc) "alone"  is auten, in the form of the singular, object, feminine pronoun "her/it." It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context.   When used as a noun, it is preceded by a definite article, and it means "the same." As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

τοῦτο [154 verses](adj sg neut acc) "This" is toutos, (touto, toutou)which means "from here," "from there," "this [thing] there," or "that [person] here." In the neuter plural form, it is often used as the object of the verb to means "these things."

τὸ [821 verses](article sg neut nom/acc)  [821 verses](article sg masc nom)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). It usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. When not preceding a a word that can become a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."  --

ἔτος, [6 verses] (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Year" is from etos, which means "year", "yearly", and "annually". -

ἕως [63 verses](conj) "While" is heos which means "until," "till," "while," "as long as," "up to the point," and "in order that" "as far as," and "up to the point that." Takes a genitive object when referring to time "until something." With the particle of possibility and the subjunctive form of the verb, the sense is until some unknown time. Referring to time, it means "which time." 

ὅτου [83 verses](pron sg masc gen) Untranslated is houtos, which as an adjective means "this," "that," "the nearer." When οὗτος and ἐκεῖνος refer to two things ἐκεῖνος, which normally means "the nearer" as well belongs to the more remote, "the latter" in time, place, or thought, οὗτος to "the nearer." Referring to time, it means "which time." 

σκάψω  [3 verses] [3 verses](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Dig" is from skapto, which means "dig", "delve", " dig about", and "cultivate by digging". 

περὶ [73 verses](prep)  "About" is peri, which means "round about (Place)," "around," "about," "concerning," "on account of," "in regard to," "before," "above," "beyond," and "all around." With the genitive, "round about" of place, "for" or "about" something," with verbs of knowing, "about" and "concerning," "before or "beyond," of superiority With the dative, "round about" of clothes, "around" in holding, "for" or "about" a struggle, "on account of" and "by reason of" a cause. With the accusative, "around" in movement, caring and generally of relationships "about,"  "about" of time. As an adverb "around," "about," also, "near, by," and "exceedingly" in relationships.

αὐτὴν [39 verses](adj sg fem acc) "It"  is auten, in the form of the singular, object, feminine pronoun "her/it." It refers to feminine nouns not just female people, so it is translated as both "she" or "it" depending on the context.   When used as a noun, it is preceded by a definite article, and it means "the same." As the object of a preposition, an accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement.

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

βάλω[54 verses] (verb 1st sg fut ind act) "Dung it" (with kopiia below) is ballo, which means "to throw," "to let fall," "to cast," "to put," "to pour," "to place money on deposit," "push forward or in front [of animals]," "to shed," "to place," "to pay,"to throw [of dice,]" "to be lucky," "to fall," "to lay as foundation," "to begin to form," "to dash oneself with water," and "to bathe."

κόπρια: [2 verses] (noun dual fem acc) "Dung " is from kopria (with ballo above) which means "dunghill", "rubbish-heap", "dung", "muck", and "manure".

Related Verses: 

Front Page Date: 

Aug 11 2024