Mark 5:39 Why make ye this ado, and weep?

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Why do you raise a clamor and weep? This child  didn't [really] die [at this point] but sleeps.

KJV : 

Mark 5:39 Why make ye this ado, and weep? the damsel is not dead, but sleepeth.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The Greek verb translated as "make ye..ado" means a crowd making noise that creates a disturbance or uproar or applause. This is the only time Jesus uses this word, which usually indicates that it was chosen for its double meaning. In this case, the word also refers to the confusion created by noise. This is his point here: the people are confused about the condition of the child. The noun translated as "damsel" means only "little child." It is not feminine at all. It is neutral because it is used to describe children younger than seven.

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "make ado" means to make noise, but it also means the confusion caused by noise.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Τί "Why" is from tis (tis) which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "many a one", "whoever," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

θορυβεῖσθε (2nd pl pres ind mp) "Make ye this ado," is from thorybeo, which means "to make a noise, uproar, or disturbance", "to shout approbation", "to cheer", "to raise a clamor," and "to confuse by noise."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

κλαίετε; (2nd pl pres ind act) "Weep" is klaio, which means "to weep", "to cry", "to lament," and "to wail."

τὸ (article sg neut nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

παιδίον ( noun sg neut nom) "Damsel" is paidon) which means "little child" or "young child," (up to seven years) "infant" or "young slave."

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἀπέθανεν (3rd sg aor ind act) "Dead" is from apothnesko, which means "to die" and "to die off."

ἀλλὰ  (adv) "But" is from alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

καθεύδει. (3rd sg pres ind act) "Sleep" is from katheudo, which means "to lie down to sleep", "to sleep," and "to lie asleep."

KJV Analysis: 

Why The word translated as "why" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

make ye this ado, The word translated as "make ye ado" means to raise a clamor or uproar, either in celebration, anger, or, as in this case, sorrow. This is the only time that Jesus used this word. It also means the confusion caused by noise.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

weep?  The verb translated as "weep" means "to weep", "to lament," and "to cry".

the The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

damsel  The word translated as "damsel" means simply a "child" up to the age of seven. It is almost always translated that way in the NT. This is the only exception. The noun is neutral, not feminine.

is...dead, This verb means means "to die" and "to die off." The tense indicates something that happened at some point in time in past, present, or future.

not The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

but The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

sleepeth. "Sleep" is a verb means "to lie down to sleep", "to sleep," and "to lie asleep."

Front Page Date: 

Jul 18 2019