Matthew 10:13 And if the house is worthy,

Context: 

Sending of Apostles, housing

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And, when, truly the household is deserving, that contentment of yours must show up on it. When, however, it doesn't want for be deserving, that contentment of yours must be returned upon you.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:13 And if the house be worthy, let your peace come upon it: but if it be not worthy, let your peace return to you.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The two parallel sentences in this verse are very typical of Jesus's speaking style, but only the KJV respects their symmetry.  The addition and subtraction of words gets worse with each new edition of the Bible.

This verse provides more context for the meaning of the Greek word translated as "worthy" or "deserving" than Jesus has used in two earlier verses. The sense here is "worthy of peace or contentment." If we think of "peace" as a kind of balance, its use with the word translated as "worthy," a word that means "counterbalancing," make more sense.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:13 If the home is deserving, let your peace rest on it; if it is not, let your peace return to you.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:13 If it turns out to be a worthy home, let your blessing stand; if it is not, take back the blessing.

Wordplay: 

 The image of "peace" or "contentment" as a moving force, flowing between things.  

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐὰν (partic) "If" is from ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event.

μὲν (partic) Untranslated is men, which is generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly."

(3rd sg pres subj act) "Be" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

(article sg fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

οἰκία (noun sg fem nom) "The house" is from oikia, which means "house", "building," and "household." --

ἀξία, (adj sg fem nom) "Worthy" is from axios, which means "counterbalancing", "weighing as much", "of like value", "worth as much as", "worthy", "goodly", "deserved", "due", "worthy", "estimable", "worthy of", "deserving", "fit", "due," and "as deserved." OR (noun sg fem nom) "Worthy" is from axia, (KJV has the adjective, not the noun), a noun that means "worth", "value", of persons, "reputation", and "dignity", generally, a man's "due", "merit", "deserts", " moral value", an "estimate of a thing's worth", and "opinion."

ἐλθάτω (3rd sg aor imperat act) "let come" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

(article sg fem nom)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

εἰρήνη (noun sg fem nom) "Peace" is eirene, which means "time of peace," "national tranquility," "peace", "tranquility," "personal tranquility", and "harmony." It is the name for the goddess of peace.

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is from humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐπ(prep) "Upon" is from epi which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against." -

αὐτήν: (adj sg fem acc) "It" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἐὰν (partic) "If" is from ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event.

δὲ (partic) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

μὴ (partic) "Not" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

(3rd sg pres subj act) "It be" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ἀξία, (adj sg fem nom) "Worthy" is from axios, which means "counterbalancing", "weighing as much", "of like value", "worth as much as", "worthy", "goodly", "deserved", "due", "worthy", "estimable", "worthy of", "deserving", "fit", "due," and "as deserved." OR (noun sg fem nom) "Worthy" is from axia, (KJV has the adjective, not the noun), a noun that means "worth", "value", of persons, "reputation", and "dignity", generally, a man's "due", "merit", "deserts", " moral value", an "estimate of a thing's worth", and "opinion."

(article sg fem nom)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

εἰρήνη (noun sg fem nom) "Peace" is eirene, which means "time of peace," "national tranquility," "peace", "tranquility,""personal tranquility," and "harmony." It is the name for the goddess of peace.

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen)"Your" is from humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐφ᾽(prep) "Upon" is from epi which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against."

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is from humas the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐπιστραφήτω. [9 times](3rd sg aor imperat pass) "Return" is from epistrepho, which means "to turn about", "to turn around", "turn towards", "return", "curve", "twist", "go back-and forwards", "pay attention to," "to turn one's mind towards," "regard", "conduct oneself," and "behave," and in the passive to "be converted", "to be distorted", "turn oneself round", "are turned," and as an adjective, "earnest", "vehement."

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" here is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

if -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "if" means "if might." It indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone so "when" works frequently in English. For tis word, "if possibly" or "when" seem to work better in English.

untranslated "truly"-- (MW) The untranslated word that appears here means "truly" and "certainly." It is the Greek equivalent of the Aramaic word "amen".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

house -- The Greek word translated as "the house," was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house. The word here refers to the "household", that is, the people in the house.

be -- The verb "be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It is in the form of possibility, which is required in an "if" or "when"  clause.

worthy,--  The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value. It is a major focus of this section. Since the form is feminine, referring to "the household" in this verse, instead of masculine, as in the earlier verses, the word could also be the noun meaning "worth", "value", and "reputation."

let -- This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second-person. This form is used as something like our word "must."

your -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

peace -- "Peace" is the Greek word that means harmony between individuals and nations" and the general idea of safety, security, and prosperity. It is the opposite of the state of war. In Hebrew, the word for peace was used in salutations and as an inquiry as to one's health. It is both as a state of tranquility, personal and social, and contentment.  The sense of this word is "peace" when applied to countries, but as a personal state of mind, we would describe it as "contentment."

come -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway" or "show up". More about this word in this article. The "let" comes from the use of a third person command. We don't have that form in English. Instead, we use the word "must" with the verb to capture the same idea.

upon -- The word translated as "upon" also means "against", "before", "by" or "on."

it: -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it technically means "the same."

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

if -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "if" means "if might" and indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This works more like our word "when".

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

be -- The phrase "be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

not -- (CW) The negative "not" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. With the verb "to be," the sense is "doesn't seem." More about the Greek negative in this article.

worthy, --  The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value. It is a major focus of this section. Since the form is feminine, referring to "the household" in this verse, instead of masculine, as in the earlier verses, the word could also be the noun meaning "worth", "value", and "reputation."

let -- This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second-person. This form is used as something like our word "must."

your - The word translated as "your" is plural, addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

peace -- "Peace" is the Greek word that means harmony between individuals and nations" and the general idea of safety, security, and prosperity. It is the opposite of the state of war. In Hebrew, the word for peace was used in salutations and as an inquiry as to one's health. It is both as a state of tranquility, personal and social, and contentment.  The sense of this word is "peace" when applied to countries, but as a personal state of mind, we would describe it as "contentment."

return -- (WV) "Return" is translated from a Greek word "to turn about" or "to turn around," but also means "cause to return" and "to turn one's mind towards" something. the form here is not the active voice, but the passive. In the passive,  it means "to turn oneself around." "be returned," or "be turned around." Jesus uses it specifically to mean "going back" to a previous position.

to -- (OS) The word translated as "to" also means "against", "before", "by" or "on." This is the same word translated as "upon" earlier in the verse.

you -- The word translated as "you" is the second person plural.

KJV Translation Issues: 

9

CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" is not the simple "if" but one with a particle that makes it more like "when."

MW - Missing Word -- The word "truly" is not shown in the English translation.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" is not the simple "if" but one with a particle that makes it more like "when."

CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" is the negative of thinking, wanting, or seeming.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the passive voice not active, so "be returned."

OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "to" existed in the KJV Greek source but an "upon" appears in  the one we used today.

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" here is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

If -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "if" means "if might." It indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone so "when" works frequently in English. For tis word, "if possibly" or "when" seem to work better in English.

untranslated "truly"-- (MW) The untranslated word that appears here means "truly" and "certainly." It is the Greek equivalent of the Aramaic word "amen".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

home -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "home" was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house. The word here refers to the "household", that is, the people in the house. The word "home" doesn't capture the idea of a group of people.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It is in the form of possibility, which is required in an "if" or "when"  clause.

deserving, --  The word translated here as "deserving" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value. It is a major focus of this section. Since the form is feminine, referring to "the household" in this verse, instead of masculine, as in the earlier verses, the word could also be the noun meaning "worth", "value", and "reputation."

let -- This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second-person. This form is used as something like our word "must."

your -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

peace -- "Peace" is the Greek word that means harmony between individuals and nations" and the general idea of safety, security, and prosperity. It is the opposite of the state of war. In Hebrew, the word for peace was used in salutations and as an inquiry as to one's health. It is both as a state of tranquility, personal and social, and contentment.  The sense of this word is "peace" when applied to countries, but as a personal state of mind, we would describe it as "contentment."

rest -- (WW) The word translated as "rest" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway" or "show up". More about this word in this article. The "let" comes from the use of a third person command. We don't have that form in English. Instead, we use the word "must" with the verb to capture the same idea.

on -- The word translated as "on" also means  "upon," "against", "before", "by" or "on."

it: -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it technically means "the same."

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

if -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "if" means "if might" and indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This works more like our word "when".

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- The phrase "be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

not -- (CW) The negative "not" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. With the verb "to be," the sense is "doesn't seem." More about the Greek negative in this article.

untranslated "deserving"-- (MW) The untranslated word "deserving" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value. It is a major focus of this section. Since the form is feminine, referring to "the household" in this verse, instead of masculine, as in the earlier verses, the word could also be the noun meaning "worth", "value", and "reputation."

let -- This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second-person. This form is used as something like our word "must."

your - The word translated as "your" is plural, addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

peace -- "Peace" is the Greek word that means harmony between individuals and nations" and the general idea of safety, security, and prosperity. It is the opposite of the state of war. In Hebrew, the word for peace was used in salutations and as an inquiry as to one's health. It is both as a state of tranquility, personal and social, and contentment.  The sense of this word is "peace" when applied to countries, but as a personal state of mind, we would describe it as "contentment."

return -- (WV) "Return" is translated from a Greek word "to turn about" or "to turn around," but also means "cause to return" and "to turn one's mind towards" something. the form here is not the active voice, but the passive. In the passive,  it means "to turn oneself around." "be returned," or "be turned around." Jesus uses it specifically to mean "going back" to a previous position.

to -- (WW) The word translated as "to" also means "against", "before", "by" or "on." This is the same word translated as "upon" earlier in the verse.

you -- The word translated as "you" is the second person plural.

NIV Translation Issues: 

12

MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.

CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" is not the simple "if" but one with a particle that makes it more like "when."

MW - Missing Word -- The word "truly" is not shown in the English translation.

CW - Confusing Word -- The "home" refers to the "household" of people.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "rest" means "come."

CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" is not the simple "if" but one with a particle that makes it more like "when."

CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" is the negative of thinking, wanting, or seeming.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "deserving" is not shown in the English translation.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the passive voice not active, so "be returned."

WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "to" means "upon."

NLT Analysis: 

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" here is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

If -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "if" means "if might." It indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone so "when" works frequently in English. For tis word, "if possibly" or "when" seem to work better in English.

untranslated "truly"-- (MW) The untranslated word that appears here means "truly" and "certainly." It is the Greek equivalent of the Aramaic word "amen".

turns out -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "turns out " in the Greek source.

to be -- (WF) The verb "to be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It is in the form of possibility, which is required in an "if" or "when"  clause. It is not an infinitive, "to be" but a simple "is."

a -- (WW) The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

worthy ,--  The word translated here as "worthy" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value. It is a major focus of this section. Since the form is feminine, referring to "the household" in this verse, instead of masculine, as in the earlier verses, the word could also be the noun meaning "worth", "value", and "reputation."

home -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "home" was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house. The word here refers to the "household", that is, the people in the house. The word "home" doesn't capture the idea of a group of people.

let -- This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second-person. This form is used as something like our word "must."

your -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

blessing -- (WW) "Blessing" is the Greek word that means harmony between individuals and nations" and the general idea of safety, security, and prosperity. It is the opposite of the state of war. In Hebrew, the word for peace was used in salutations and as an inquiry as to one's health. It is both as a state of tranquility, personal and social, and contentment.  The sense of this word is "peace" when applied to countries, but as a personal state of mind, we would describe it as "contentment."

stand -- (WW) The word translated as "stand" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway" or "show up". More about this word in this article. The "let" comes from the use of a third person command. We don't have that form in English. Instead, we use the word "must" with the verb to capture the same idea.

untranslated "upon"-- (MW) The untranslated word "upon" also means  "upon," "against", "before", "by" or "on."

untranslated "it"-- (MW) The untranslated word "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it technically means "the same."

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

if -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "if" means "if might" and indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This works more like our word "when".

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- The phrase "be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

not -- (CW) The negative "not" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. With the verb "to be," the sense is "doesn't seem." More about the Greek negative in this article.

untranslated "deserving"-- (MW) The untranslated word "deserving" means "counterbalancing." It is the idea of weighing the same as something of equal value. From this comes the idea of "being worthy" or "due," not from inherent worth but because you give value for equal value. It is a major focus of this section. Since the form is feminine, referring to "the household" in this verse, instead of masculine, as in the earlier verses, the word could also be the noun meaning "worth", "value", and "reputation."

take back -- (WF, WV) "Take back" is translated from a Greek word "to turn about" or "to turn around," but also means "cause to return" and "to turn one's mind towards" something. the form here is not the active voice, but the passive. In the passive,  it means "to turn oneself around." "be returned," or "be turned around." This verse is not a second-person command but a third-person command, which has the sense of "it must" or "let it." Jesus uses it specifically to mean "going back" to a previous position.

the  -- This word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

blessing -- "Blessing" is the Greek word that means harmony between individuals and nations" and the general idea of safety, security, and prosperity. It is the opposite of the state of war. In Hebrew, the word for peace was used in salutations and as an inquiry as to one's health. It is both as a state of tranquility, personal and social, and contentment.  The sense of this word is "peace" when applied to countries, but as a personal state of mind, we would describe it as "contentment."

untranslated "to"-- (MW) The untranslated word "to" also means "against", "before", "by" or "on." This is the same word translated as "upon" earlier in the verse.

untranslated "you"-- (MW) The untranslated word is the second person plural.

NLT Translation Issues: 

19

MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.

CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" is not the simple "if" but one with a particle that makes it more like "when."

MW - Missing Word -- The word "truly" is not shown in the English translation.

IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "turns out" doesn't exist in the source.

WF - Wrong Form -  The "to be" is not an infinitive but a verb, "is."

WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" means "the."

CW - Confusing Word -- The "home" refers to the "household" of people.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "blessing" means "peace" or "contentment."

WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "stand" means "come."

MW - Missing Word -- The word "upon" is not shown in the English translation.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "it" is not shown in the English translation.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "but" is not shown in the English translation.

CW - Confusing Word -- The "if" is not the simple "if" but one with a particle that makes it more like "when."

CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" is the negative of thinking, wanting, or seeming.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "deserving" is not shown in the English translation.

WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "take back" means "return."

WV  - Wrong Voice - The verb is in the passive voice not active, so "be returned."

MW - Missing Word -- The word "upon" is not shown in the English translation.

MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" is not shown in the English translation.

The Spoken Version: 

“If they are fair, they will return our embrace,” said Phillip.
“And I will be able to relax,” responded Andrew.  
“And, if that household is truly deserving,” added the Master, “that easiness of yours must show up in it.”
“If we are relaxed, then they will relax,” summarized Ugly Jake.
“I certainly don’t expect to be embraced everywhere,” reiterated Ben Simon sourly. “As I said, the world isn’t fair.”
“People are such a bother,” agreed Brother James asked the Master. “But what can we do when we enter a distrustful household?”
“When, however, it doesn’t want for be fair?” responded the Master, pausing to think.
“Worry?” suggested Andrew.
The Master shook his head, “no.”
“That contentment of yours must be returned to you,” countered the Master.

evidence: 

118.00

Front Page Date: 

Aug 29 2020