Matthew 10:28 And do not fear those who kill the body,

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

Sending of Apostles, fear of death

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And you don't want to be terrified by the ones destroying the body: the self, however, not having power themselves to destroy. Be frighted, however, more by the one having the power not only a self but also a body to destroy in Gehenna.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:28 And do not fear those who kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul. Fear yourselves, however, but rather fear him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is clearly a warning to be afraid of ourselves and our thoughts rather than the actions of others. Though modern translations insert the idea of "God" into the second part of the verse ("the One" and "only God"), the Greek seems to indicate that the "one" who can kill both the body and soul is ourselves.  The "fear" in the second part of the verse is the "middle" voice, which has the sense of "fear yourselves." This form is not used in the first "fear" of the verse.

To understand Jesus's view of  "soul," and "body" please read this article.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:28 Do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather, be afraid of the One who can destroy both soul and body in hell.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:28 Don’t be afraid of those who want to kill your body; they cannot touch your soul. Fear only God, who can destroy both soul and body in hell

Wordplay: 

 The words "body" and "mind" hear also refers more generally to the physical and spiritual. 

My Takeaway: 

The self is more than the body.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

μὴ (particle) "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

φοβηθῆτε ( 2nd pl aor ind/subj pass) "Fear" is phobeo, which means to "put to flight." "terrify", "alarm", "frighten," and in the passive, "be put to flight", "be seized with fear," be frightened", "stand in awe of" (of persons)", "dread (of persons)," and "fear or fear about something."

ἀπὸ (prep) Untranslated here is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" or "by" as an origin or cause.

τῶν (article pl masc gen) "those" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἀποκτεινόντων (part pl pres act masc gen) "who kill" is apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from."but it is a stronger form than the normal verb kteino. It is more like our "destroy."

τὸ (article sg neut acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

σῶμα (noun sg neut acc) "Body" is soma, which means "body", "dead body", "the living body", "animal body", "person", "human being", "any corporeal substance", "metallic substance", "figure of three dimensions [math]", "solid", "whole [of a thing]", "frame [of a thing]", "the body of the proof", "a body of writings." and "text of a document."

τὴν (article sg neut acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δὲ (partic) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ψυχὴν (noun sg neut acc) "Soul" is from psyche, which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul." --

μὴ (partic) "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

δυναμένων (part pl pres mp masc gen ) "Are...able" is from the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

ἀποκτεῖναι (aor inf act) "To kill" is from apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from."but it is a stronger form than the normal verb kteino. It is more like our "destroy."

φοβεῖσθε (2nd pl pres imperat mp) "Fear" is phobeo, which means to "put to flight." "terrify", "alarm", "frighten," and in the passive, "be put to flight", "be seized with fear," be frightened", "stand in awe of" (of persons)", "dread (of persons)," and "fear or fear about something."

δὲ (partic) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

μᾶλλον (adv) "Rather" is from mallon, which is the comparative form of mala which means "very", "exceedingly", "more certainly", "especially," "more", "to a greater degree," and "rather."

τὸν (article sg neut acc) "Which" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δυνάμενον (part sg pres mp masc acc) "Is able" is from the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ψυχὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Soul" is from psyche, which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul." --

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

σῶμα (noun sg neut acc) "Body" is soma, which means "body", "dead body", "the living body", "animal body", "person", "human being", "any corporeal substance", "metallic substance", "figure of three dimensions [math]", "solid", "whole [of a thing]", "frame [of a thing]", "the body of the proof", "a body of writings." and "text of a document."

ἀπολέσαι (aor inf act or verb 3rd sg aor opt act ) "To kill" is from apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from."but it is a stronger form than the normal verb kteino. It is more like our "destroy." It is in the form of a present participle, "destroying" acting as a noun ("those destroying").

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

γεέννῃ. (noun sg fem dat) "Hell" is geenna, which is Greek for Gehenna, the valley of Hinnom (the Hebrew word), south of Jerusalem where trash, including diseased animals and human corpses, was burned.

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

do -- (WW) This helping verb is added to make this a command, but the Greek here is not a command, but the verb's form requires a "should" or a "might."

not -- The negative "not" used here is again the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done.

fear -- "Fear" is translated from a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive (as here), it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, as here, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." It is not a command, as you would think from the KJV. However, the next word pushes the meaning to "to put to flight."

untranslated "from"-- (MW) The untranslated word "from" or "out of" in both location and when referring to a source. It appears before the word for "them which kill." It is the same preposition that is used in the prefix of the word translated as "kill."

those -- The word translated as "those" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

who -- This word is added because the following verb form was changed.

kill -- (WF) "Kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill." The base word means "to slay" but it has a prefix that means "out of". This has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here. It is in the form of an adjective, "destroying" acting as an adjective to the article ("the ones destroying").

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

body, -- The word translated as "body" means the body, living or dead, or an animal or person. It is the opposite of "spirit" or "mind." It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. It also has many of the same additional meanings, such as a "body of evidence" as "body" does in English. Please read this article.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

are -- This indicates the present tense of the following verb.

not The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" or "you don't think" to do something, not that it isn't done. This negative applies to following verbal adjective.

able-- (WF) "Able" is a word indicating having the power or a desire to accomplish something. It is in a form where the subject ("they") acts on themselves. It is not an active verb but a verb adjective, "having power" modifying the article before "kill" that means "the ones."

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

kill -- "Kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." This "kill" is confusing because the same word is translated as "destroy" later in the verse. The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

soul. -- The word translated here as "soul" is a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Christ uses it to mean primary the "self" who knows themselves in this life. This is especially clear here where "mind" is contrasted with "body". This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." Please read this article.

Fear This "fear" is a change from the earlier verb. Again, it is translated from a Greek verb that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," and it is in the passive, which it means "to be put to flight" and "be frightened". Here. however, it is in a form that indicates you are doing this to yourselves. Unlike the first "fear", it is a command in the present tense.

yourselves, -- This is from middle voice of the firm, which indicates an action is done for or by the subject.

however, -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

but -- This is a duplicate of the previous word.

rather -- The word translated as "rather" is the comparative form of the Greek word meaning "very" so the sense is something like "especially", "to a greater degree," or "rather."

fear -- (IW) There is no repeated verb "fear" here.

him who -- The word translated as "him who" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

is -- This indicates the present tense of the following verb.

able-- (WF) "Able" is a word indicating having the power or a desire to accomplish something. It is in a form where the subject ("they") acts on themselves. It is not an active verb but a verb adjective, "having power" modifying the previous article, "the ones."

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

destroy -- (CW) "Destroy" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay."  This word idea translated as "kill" earlier in the verse. The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

both -- The Greek word translated as "both" is used as the conjunction "and", the same as the "and" below, but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

soul -- The word translated here as "soul" is a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Christ uses it to mean primary the "self" who knows themselves in this life. This is especially clear here where "mind" is contrasted with "body". This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." Please read this article.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

body -- The word translated as "body" means the body, living or dead, or an animal or person. It is the opposite of "spirit" or "mind." It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. It also has many of the same additional meanings, such as a "body of evidence" as "body" does in English. Please read this article.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within" or "among."

hell. -- (WW) The word translated as "hell" was the name of an area where a constant fire was kept for disposing of trash from Jerusalem. This area was originally where children were sacrificed to Baal, or may have been. See this article on the words for "hell".  

KJV Translation Issues: 

8
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "do" should be "should."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "from" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "kill" is not an active verb but a participle, "killing" or "destroying."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "able" is not an active verb but a participle, "being able" or "having power."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "fear" doesn't repeat here in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "able" is not an active verb but a participle, "being able" or "having power."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "destroy" was translated twice before as "kill."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hell" is a place name, "Gehenna."

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

Do -- (WW) This helping verb is added to make this a command, but the Greek here is not a command, but the verb's form requires a "should" or a "might."

not -- The negative "not" used here is again the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done.

be afraid -- "Be afraid" is translated from a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive (as here), it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, as here, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." It is not a command, as you would think from the KJV. However, the next word pushes the meaning to "to put to flight."

of --  This word "of" means "from" or "out of" in both location and when referring to a source. It appears before the word for "them which kill." It is the same preposition that is used in the prefix of the word translated as "kill."

those -- The word translated as "those" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

who -- This word is added because the following verb form was changed.

kill -- (WF) "Kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill." The base word means "to slay" but it has a prefix that means "out of". This has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here. It is in the form of an adjective, "destroying" acting as an adjective to the article ("the ones destroying").

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

body, -- The word translated as "body" means the body, living or dead, or an animal or person. It is the opposite of "spirit" or "mind." It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. It also has many of the same additional meanings, such as a "body of evidence" as "body" does in English. Please read this article.

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

can --(WF) "Can" is a word indicating having the power or a desire to accomplish something. It is in a form where the subject ("they") acts on themselves. It is not an active verb but a verb adjective, "having power" modifying the article before "kill" that means "the ones." In Greek, it is not a helping or auxiliary verb like "can" is in English.

not -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" or "you don't think" to do something, not that it isn't done. This negative applies to following verbal adjective.

kill -- (WF) "Kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." This word is actually an infinitive, but becomes an active verb because the helping verb "can" was used earlier. This "kill" is confusing because the same word is translated as "destroy" later in the verse. The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

soul. -- The word translated here as "soul" is a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Christ uses it to mean primary the "self" who knows themselves in this life. This is especially clear here where "mind" is contrasted with "body". This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." Please read this article.

Rather, -- The word translated as "rather" is the comparative form of the Greek word meaning "very" so the sense is something like "especially", "to a greater degree," or "rather." This word actually appears after the conjunction "but" or "however" that is not translated here.

be afraid -- This "be afraid" is a change from the earlier verb. Again, it is translated from a Greek verb that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," and it is in the passive, which it means "to be put to flight" and "be frightened". Here. however, it is in a form that indicates you are doing this to yourselves. Unlike the first "fear", it is a command in the present tense.

untranslated "however"-- (MW) The untranslated word "however" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

of -- There is no "of" justified by the Greek. It is added because the verb meaning "fear" was changed into a noun, "fear."

the One -- The word translated as "the One" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

who -- (IW) This word is inserted because the following word was changed from the form of an adjective to an active verb.

can -- (WF) "Able" is a word indicating having the power or a desire to accomplish something. It is in a form where the subject ("they") acts on themselves. It is not an active verb but a verb adjective, "having power" modifying the previous article, "the ones."

destroy -- (CW) "Destroy" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay."  This word idea translated as "kill" earlier in the verse. The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

both -- The Greek word translated as "both" is used as the conjunction "and", the same as the "and" below, but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

soul -- The word translated here as "soul" is a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Christ uses it to mean primary the "self" who knows themselves in this life. This is especially clear here where "mind" is contrasted with "body". This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." Please read this article.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

body -- The word translated as "body" means the body, living or dead, or an animal or person. It is the opposite of "spirit" or "mind." It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. It also has many of the same additional meanings, such as a "body of evidence" as "body" does in English. Please read this article.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within" or "among."

hell. -- (WW) The word translated as "hell" was the name of an area where a constant fire was kept for disposing of trash from Jerusalem. This area was originally where children were sacrificed to Baal, or may have been. See this article on the words for "hell".  

NIV Translation Issues: 

10
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "do" should be "should."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "kill" is not an active verb but a participle, "killing" or "destroying."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "can" is not an active verb but a participle, "being able" or "having power."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "kill" is not an active verb but a participle, "killing" or "destroying."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "however" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "can" is not an active verb but a participle, "being able" or "having power."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "destroy" was translated twice before as "kill."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hell" is a place name, "Gehenna."

NLT Analysis: 

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

Do -- (WW) This helping verb is added to make this a command, but the Greek here is not a command, but the verb's form requires a "should" or a "might."

n't -- The negative "not" used here is again the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done.

be afraid -- "Be afraid" is translated from a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive (as here), it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, as here, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." It is not a command, as you would think from the KJV. However, the next word pushes the meaning to "to put to flight."

of --  This word "of" means "from" or "out of" in both location and when referring to a source. It appears before the word for "them which kill." It is the same preposition that is used in the prefix of the word translated as "kill."

those -- The word translated as "those" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

who -- This word is added because the following verb form was changed.

kill -- (WF) "Kill" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill." The base word means "to slay" but it has a prefix that means "out of". This has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here. It is in the form of an adjective, "destroying" acting as an adjective to the article ("the ones destroying").

your -- (WW) The word translated as "your" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

body, -- The word translated as "body" means the body, living or dead, or an animal or person. It is the opposite of "spirit" or "mind." It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. It also has many of the same additional meanings, such as a "body of evidence" as "body" does in English. Please read this article.

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

 they -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

can --(WF) "Can" is a word indicating having the power or a desire to accomplish something. It is in a form where the subject ("they") acts on themselves. It is not an active verb but a verb adjective, "having power" modifying the article before "kill" that means "the ones." In Greek, it is not a helping or auxiliary verb like "can" is in English.

not -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" or "you don't think" to do something, not that it isn't done. This negative applies to following verbal adjective.

touch -- (WW, WF) "Touch" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." This word is actually an infinitive, but becomes an active verb because the helping verb "can" was used earlier. This "kill" is confusing because the same word is translated as "destroy" later in the verse. The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

soul. -- The word translated here as "soul" is a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Christ uses it to mean primary the "self" who knows themselves in this life. This is especially clear here where "mind" is contrasted with "body". This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." Please read this article.

Fear  -- This "fear" is the same as the earlier "be afraid", but the form is changed from the earlier verb. Again, it is translated from a Greek verb that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," and it is in the passive, which it means "to be put to flight" and "be frightened". Here. however, it is in a form that indicates you are doing this to yourselves. Unlike the first "fear", it is a command in the present tense.

only God, -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "only God" in the Greek source.

untranslated "however"-- (MW) The untranslated word "however" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

untranslated "rather"-- (MW) The untranslated word "rather" is the comparative form of the Greek word meaning "very" so the sense is something like "especially", "to a greater degree," or "rather." This word actually appears after the conjunction "but" or "however" that is not translated here.

who  -- (WW) The word translated as "who" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

can -- (WF) "Able" is a word indicating having the power or a desire to accomplish something. It is in a form where the subject ("they") acts on themselves. It is not an active verb but a verb adjective, "having power" modifying the previous article, "the ones."

destroy -- (CW) "Destroy" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay."  This word idea translated as "kill" earlier in the verse. The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. This is more the sense here.

both -- The Greek word translated as "both" is used as the conjunction "and", the same as the "and" below, but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

soul -- The word translated here as "soul" is a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Christ uses it to mean primary the "self" who knows themselves in this life. This is especially clear here where "mind" is contrasted with "body". This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." Please read this article.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

body -- The word translated as "body" means the body, living or dead, or an animal or person. It is the opposite of "spirit" or "mind." It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people. It also has many of the same additional meanings, such as a "body of evidence" as "body" does in English. Please read this article.

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within" or "among."

hell. -- (WW) The word translated as "hell" was the name of an area where a constant fire was kept for disposing of trash from Jerusalem. This area was originally where children were sacrificed to Baal, or may have been. See this article on the words for "hell".  

NLT Translation Issues: 

15
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "do" should be "should."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "kill" is not an active verb but a participle, "killing" or "destroying."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "your" means "the."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "but" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "can" is not an active verb but a participle, "being able" or "having power."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "touch" means "destroy."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "touch" is not an active verb but a participle, "killing" or "destroying."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "only God" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "however" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "rather" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "who" is  "the."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "can" is not an active verb but a participle, "being able" or "having power."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "destroy" was translated twice before as "kill."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hell" is a place name, "Gehenna."

The Spoken Version: 

“And I’m less worried about secrets than I am bodily damage,” said Jim.
“And you don’t want to be terrified by those destroying the body,” the teacher said. “They don’t, however, feel they have the power themselves to destroy the self. Fear for yourselves, however, instead the one having the power for himself—.” He pointed at Jim’s heart. “Not only a self but a body, he can destroy in a Gehenna!” He made his throwing out the trash motion.

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Sep 13 2020