Matthew 10:39 He that finds his life shall lose it:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The one discovering that self of his might lose it. And, the one losing that self of his on account of me will find it.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:39 He that findeth his life shall lose it: and he that loseth his life for my sake shall find it.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The word translated as "lose" normally means "destroy" but Jesus uses it occasionally to mean "lose."  Here, we can tell by the context because it is contrasted with "find." Jesus's use of this word to mean "lose" is fairly unique in Greek.

The word translated as "life" here is not the word usually translated as "life" but usually as "soul." It  was used in Matthew 10:28 in contrast with killing the "body."  These concepts are explored in this article.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:39 Whoever finds their life will lose it, and whoever loses their life for my sake will find it.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:39 If you cling to your life, you will lose it; but if you give up your life for me, you will find it.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

(article sg masc nom) "He that" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

εὑρὼν (part sg aor act masc nom) "Findeth" is from heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain."

τὴν (article sg masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

ψυχὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is from psyche, which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul."

αὐτοῦ (adj 3rd sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἀπολέσει (3rd sg fut ind act or verb 3rd sg aor subj act) "Shall lose" is apollymi, which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone."

αὐτήν, (adj sg fem acc) "It" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

(article sg masc nom) "He that" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἀπολέσας (part sg aor act masc nom) "Loseth" is from apollymi, which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone." --

τὴν (article sg masc gen)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). -

ψυχὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is from psyche, which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul."

αὐτοῦ (adj 3rd sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἕνεκεν (prep ) "For...sake" is from heneka, which means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

ἐμοῦ (pron 1st sg masc gen) "Me" is from emou, which means "me", and "mine". -- "Me" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek

εὑρήσει (3rd sg fut ind act) "Shall find" is from heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain."

αὐτήν. (adj sg fem acc ) "It" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

KJV Analysis: 

He that -- The word translated as "he that" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

findeth -- (WF) The term used for "findeth" means "find out" and "discover." It is a participle acting as an adjective acting like a noun with the article, "the one finding."  It is in the tense indicating something that happens at a certain point in time. This word is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life -- (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to mean primary the "self" or "ego," but the Bible usually translates this as "soul." This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." This is not the word usually translated as "life" in Gospels.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

lose -- The word translated as "lose" primarily  means to "destroy" or "demolish." However, Jesus clearly uses it to mean "lose" in certain contexts. Here, the context is obvious because it is contrasted with "find."

it: -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun in the form of an object matching the form of "life" or "soul.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

he that -- The word translated as "he that" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

loseth -- (WF) The word translated as "loseth" primarily  means to "destroy" or "demolish." However, Jesus clearly uses it to mean "lose" in certain contexts. Here, the context is obvious because it is contrasted with "find." It is a participle acting as an adjective acting like a noun with the article, "the one losing."  It is in the tense indicating something that happens at a certain point in time.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life -- (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to mean primary the "self" or "ego," but the Bible usually translates this as "soul." This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." This is not the word usually translated as "life" in Gospels.

for -- The word translated as "for" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

my --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

sake -- This is added to complete the "on about of me" phrase started with "for."

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

find -- The term used for "find" means "find out" and "discover."

it. -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun in the form of an object matching the form of "life" or "soul.

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "find" is not an active verb but a participle, "finding."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "life" is the Greek word usually translated as "soul" and not the word usually translated as "life."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "lose" is not an active verb but a participle, "losing."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "life" is the Greek word usually translated as "soul" and not the word usually translated as "life."

NIV Analysis: 

Whoever -- The word translated as "whoever" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

finds -- (WF) The term used for "finds" means "find out" and "discover." It is a participle acting as an adjective acting like a noun with the article, "the one finding."  It is in the tense indicating something that happens at a certain point in time. This word is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves.

their -- (WN) The word translated as "their" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun is singular and follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life -- (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to mean primary the "self" or "ego," but the Bible usually translates this as "soul." This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." This is not the word usually translated as "life" in Gospels.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

lose -- The word translated as "lose" primarily  means to "destroy" or "demolish." However, Jesus clearly uses it to mean "lose" in certain contexts. Here, the context is obvious because it is contrasted with "find."

it: -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun in the form of an object matching the form of "life" or "soul.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

whoever -- The word translated as "whoever" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

loses -- (WF) The word translated as "loses" primarily  means to "destroy" or "demolish." However, Jesus clearly uses it to mean "lose" in certain contexts. Here, the context is obvious because it is contrasted with "find." It is a participle acting as an adjective acting like a noun with the article, "the one losing."  It is in the tense indicating something that happens at a certain point in time.

their -- (WN) The word translated as "their" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun is singular and follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life -- (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to mean primary the "self" or "ego," but the Bible usually translates this as "soul." This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." This is not the word usually translated as "life" in Gospels.

for -- The word translated as "for" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

my --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

sake -- This is added to complete the "on about of me" phrase started with "for."

will -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

find -- The term used for "find" means "find out" and "discover."

it. -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun in the form of an object matching the form of "life" or "soul.

NIV Translation Issues: 

8
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "find" is not an active verb but a participle, "finding."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "their" is translated as plural but it is singular, "his."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "life" is the Greek word usually translated as "soul" and not the word usually translated as "life."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "lose" is not an active verb but a participle, "losing."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "their" is translated as plural but it is singular, "his."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "life" is the Greek word usually translated as "soul" and not the word usually translated as "life."

NLT Analysis: 

If -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "if" in the Greek source.

you -- (WW) The word translated as "you" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

cling to -- (WW, WF) The term used for "cling" means "find out" and "discover." It is a participle acting as an adjective acting like a noun with the article, "the one finding."  It is in the tense indicating something that happens at a certain point in time. This word is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves.

your -- (WW) The word translated as "your" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun is singular and follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life -- (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to mean primary the "self" or "ego," but the Bible usually translates this as "soul." This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." This is not the word usually translated as "life" in Gospels.

you  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "you" in the Greek source.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

lose -- The word translated as "lose" primarily  means to "destroy" or "demolish." However, Jesus clearly uses it to mean "lose" in certain contexts. Here, the context is obvious because it is contrasted with "find."

it: -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun in the form of an object matching the form of "life" or "soul.

but -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "but" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

if -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "if" in the Greek source.

you -- (WW) The word translated as "you" is the Greek definite article,  "the" which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

give up -- (WW, WF) The word translated as "loses" primarily  means to "destroy" or "demolish." However, Jesus clearly uses it to mean "lose" in certain contexts. Here, the context is obvious because it is contrasted with "find." It is a participle acting as an adjective acting like a noun with the article, "the one losing."  It is in the tense indicating something that happens at a certain point in time.

your -- (WW) The word translated as "your" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun is singular and follows the noun so "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life -- (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to mean primary the "self" or "ego," but the Bible usually translates this as "soul." This Greek word is our source of the English word "psyche." This is not the word usually translated as "life" in Gospels.

for -- The word translated as "for" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

me --  (WF) "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

you  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "you" in the Greek source.

will -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

find -- The term used for "find" means "find out" and "discover."

it. -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  This pronoun in the form of an object matching the form of "life" or "soul.

NLT Translation Issues: 

17
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "if" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "you" should be "the one."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "cling to" should be "find."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "cling to" is not an active verb but a participle, "finding."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "your" should be "his."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "life" is the Greek word usually translated as "soul" and not the word usually translated as "life."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "you" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "but" should be "and."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "if" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "you" should be "the one."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "give up" should be "lose."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "give up" is not an active verb but a participle, "losing."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "your" should be "his."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "life" is the Greek word usually translated as "soul" and not the word usually translated as "life."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "you" doesn't exist in the source.

The Spoken Version: 

“But my sons were just beginning to find themselves!” Salome complained.
“The one who has discovered that self of his might destroy it,” responded the teacher thoughtfully.
“But by following you, all these boys, not only my sons, are destroying everything they have built up in their lives,” Alpheos responded.
“And,” continued the teacher cheerfully. “The one who has destroyed himself on account of me is going to discover himself.”
The followers and their families grew quiet thinking about this and what it might mean.

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Mar 31 2020