Matthew 17:7 Arise, and be not afraid.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Wake up! You don't want to scare yourselves!

KJV : 

Mat 17:7 Arise, and be not afraid.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The reaction of the apostles to the transfiguration when they heard God's voice was to fall down and tremble. Here, Christ is telling them that this reaction is wrong.

The word for "arise" means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. It is a passive command, so "Be awakened!

The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

"Fear" is translated from a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive, it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." However, it is not in the passive, but in a form where the subject acts on themselves.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἐγέρθητε (verb 2nd pl aor ind pass) "Arise" is from egeiro, which means "to awaken", "to stir up," and "to rouse."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

μὴ "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

φοβεῖσθε. (verb 2nd pl pres imperat mp) "Be afraid" is phobeo, which means to "put to flight." "terrify", "alarm", "frighten," and in the passive, "be put to flight", "be seized with fear," be frightened", "stand in awe of" (of persons)", "dread (of persons)," and "fear or fear about something."