Matthew 22:32 I am the God of Abraham,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 22:32 I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob? God is not the God of the dead, but of the living.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

"I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob."
He is really not a god of dying but of living.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is a very interesting verse regarding the meaning of the nature of the afterlife.

The first part of this verse is a quote of Exo 3:6. but, unusually, it is a paraphrase of the Greek of the Septuagint leaving out the phrase "of thy Father," which is addressed to Moses but would work for any Jew since Christ regularly referred to Abraham as the "father" of the Jews of his day. This is interesting because most of Christ's quotes are the exact wording in the Septuagint. The differences here demonstrate that the Bible authors were not just quoting the Septuagint when "translating" Christ into Greek quoting the OT. This is one more piece of evidence that Christ taught in Greek (see article here), and the Greek of the synoptic Gospels are his actual recorded words.
See this article on the concept of Gods of Death and Life.

KJV Analysis: 

The pronoun "I" is used here explicitly. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English. This accentuation is from the Septuagint, not Christ.

The word translated as "the God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." This too is from the Septuagint, but Christ often refers to "God" as "the God" though it is not always translated that way as in the previous verse, Mat 22:31.

"Abraham", "Isaac," and "Jacob" are all quoted in a Greek spelling of the Hebrew word, without the Greek ending for the possessive form. This follows the Septuagint, and lack of an ending was used in Mat 8:11, which is not an OT quote. When Christ quotes Greek names (for example, "Caesar" in Mat 22:21) they follow normal Greek word endings.

In the KJV source, there was an extra "God" appearing here that does not appear in the better Greek sources we used today.

When the verb "to be" appears early in a phrase, before the subject, as it does here, the sense is more like "he is" or, in the plural, "they are."

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

The word for "God" that appears here only has the article ("the") in front of it in some sources. Without it, the sense becomes "a god" not "The God."

The word translated as "the dead" means "corpse", "a dying man," and "inanimate, non-organic matter," but its from of that of an adjective, not a noun. Christ uses it in all three senses, referring to the actual dead, the spiritually dead, and inanimate matter. It is an adjective and has no article in front of it to make it act like a noun.

The Greek verb translated as "the living" means "to live", "the living," and "to be alive." It is a metaphor for "to be full of life", "to be strong," and "to be fresh." It is in the form of an adjective as well so "living" as opposed to "dying." It means being physically alive not just existing as a spiri

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἐγώ (pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

εἰμι (verb 1st sg pres ind act) "Am" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity."

Ἀβραὰμ "Abraham" is from Abraam, which is the Greek form of "Abraham."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity."

Ἰσαὰκ "Isaac" is from Isaak.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity."

Ἰακώβ;” "Jacob" is from Iakob.

οὐκ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

[ὁ] θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity."

νεκρῶν (adj pl masc gen) "The dead" is from nekros, which specifically means "a corpse" as well as a "dying person", "the dead as dwellers in the nether world", "the inanimate," and "the inorganic"

ἀλλὰ "But" is from alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

ζώντων. (part pl pres act masc gen) "Living" is from zao, which means "to live", "the living," and "to be alive." It is a metaphor for "to be full of life", "to be strong," and "to be fresh."

Related Verses: