Matthew 19:29 And every one that has forsaken houses,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And all who left houses, or brothers, or sisters, or a father, or a mother, or children, or property because of my name, will get many times much more. He shall also acquire a perpetual living.

KJV : 

Mat 19:29 And every one that hath forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my name's sake, shall receive an hundredfold, and shall inherit everlasting life.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

If you  think about how this phrase was spoken, with it many "or" phrases, it would clearly have been humorous.  That humor is emphasized by the use of the funny word translated as "hundredfold" or "hundred times" that is actually means "getting many times much more." Again, a typical exaggeration used in Jesus's humor.

The last words translated as "eternal life" more literally mean "a perpetual living" or  "a life lasting for an age" or "life-long living."  The sense of the word "life" as a "living" is emphasized by the word "property" at the end of the verse.  The word translated as "eternal" means "lasting for an lifetime" or "lasting for an age." It didn't have the "eternal" sense in ancient times because nothing was thought to be eternal. That is a more modern, Christian concept.

This word for "life" here that can also mean "a living" has a verb form meaning "to live" and "to be alive".  It is one of two different Greek terms translated as "life" in the Gospels. This is physical life and the substance of life.  It is physical life animated by spirit (see this article on related Greek terms). This is the life that comes from our "substance,” "property," as well as our "existence.”  When we talk about making a living, we are talking about this type of life. In verb form, it is a metaphor for "to be full of life," "to be strong," and "to be fresh.”   The basic concept is the union of flesh with spirit, to create a breathing body.

NIV : 

Mat 19:29 And everyone who has left houses or brothers or sisters or father or mother or wife or children or fields for my sake will receive a hundred times as much and will inherit eternal life.

NLT : 

Mat 19:29 And everyone who has given up houses or brothers or sisters or father or mother or children or property, for my sake, will receive a hundred times as much in return and will inherit eternal life.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πᾶς ( adj sg masc nom ) "Every one" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

ὅστις (pron sg masc nom) "That" is from hostis, which means "that", "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

ἀφῆκεν ( verb 3rd sg imperf ind act ) "Hath forsakens" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

οἰκίας (noun pl fem acc) "Houses" is from oikia, which means "house", "building," and "household."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

ἀδελφοὺς (noun pl masc acc) "Brothers" is from adelphos (adelphos),which means "son of the same mother", "kinsman", "colleague", "associate," and "brother."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

ἀδελφὰς ( noun pl fem acc) "Sisters" is from adelphe),which means "sister", "kinswoman," and was a term of endearment for a wife.

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

πατέρα (noun sg masc nom) "The Father" is from pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

μητέρα (noun sg fem acc) "Mother" is from mêtêr (meter), which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin." -- "Mother" is from the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

τέκνα (noun pl neut acc) "Children" is from teknon, which means "that which is born", "child," and "the young."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

ἀγροὺς (noun pl masc acc) "Lands" is agros, which means "field", "lands," or "country."

ἕνεκεν (prep) "For...sake" is from heneka, which means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because." -

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἐμοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "My" is from emou, which means "me", and "mine". -- "Me" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

ὀνόματος (noun sg neut gen) "Name" is from onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative.

πολλαπλασίονα (adj sg masc acc) "Hundredfold" is from pollarlasion that means "many (or a number of) times as many or as large," a "geometrical progression", "many times as many," and "more or larger than."

λήμψεται (verb fut ind 3rd sg mid )  "Shall receive" is lambano means to "take", "take hold of", "grasp", "seize", "catch", "overtake", "find out", "detect", "take as", "take [food or drugs]", "understand", "take in hand", "undertake", "take in", "hold", "get", "receive [things]", "receive hospitably", "receive in marriage", "receive as produce", "profit", "admit", "initiate", "take hold of", "lay hold on", "seize and keep hold of", "obtain possession of", "lay hands upon", "find fault with", "censure," "to apprehend with the senses", "to take hold of," and "to seize." It is also specifically used to mean "seized with emotion." --

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ζωὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is from zoe, which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

αἰώνιον (adj sg fem acc) "Everlasting" is from aionios, which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age."

κληρονομήσει. (verb 2nd sg fut ind mid) "Inherit" is from kleronomeo, which means "inherit", "acquire," and "to be an heir."

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

everyone The word translated as "every one" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. It is in th singular so adding "one" makes sense.

that -- The word translated as "that," more specifically means "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "which soever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

hath  -- (WT) This helping verb "hath" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past. The tense here is the simple, imperfect past.

forsaken -- (WW) "Forsaken" is from a Greek verb that means "to let fall," "to let loose", "to get rid of," and "to leave alone." This is the same word that is translated as "leave" and "forgive" in the New Testament. Though it is a different word that the one used in Mat 19:9 to talk about leaving a wife, the two ideas share many of the same meanings. In the Luke 18:29, a similar verse, this word is translated as "hath left".

houses, -- The Greek word translated as "houses," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house. Notice however that it is plural. This is because a person could be considered to belong his mother's parent's house, his father's parent's house, and the house of an employer.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

brethren, -- The word translated as "brother" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

sisters, "Sisters" is  the feminine form of the previous word that means "sister", "kinswoman," and was a term of endearment for a wife.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

father, -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother, -- "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

or wife, -- (OS) The words for "of wife" does not exist in today's sources. This is important because otherwise, Christ's lessons would not be consistent. After all, the given that this chapter begins with lessons about marriage, saying that a man cannot leave his wife.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

children, -- The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

lands, -- The primary meaning for "lands" is not its sense as a country, but a field. Since it is used in the plural, the reference here is to the fields that ninety percent of the people worked to earn their living. Today, we might say "jobs."

for -- This is part of the preposition that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because." This preposition is usually paired with the noun "sake" in English.

my --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

name's -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." Read more about its use in this article.

sake, -- "Sake" is translated from a Greek word that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

shall  -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

receive --  "Receive" is translated from a Greek word that primarily means "take," and has many different uses as we use "take" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing." In English, it is more like our word "get" since it means both taking something and receiving it.

untranslated "by/for yourselves"-- (MW) An untranslated phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "pray by yourself."

an -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

hundredfold, -- (WW) The word translated as " hundredfold" is different in the sources we use today than the KJV source. The original word was one meaning "many, many times as many."

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

shall  -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

inherit -- "Inherit" is from a verb that means "inherit", "acquire," and "to be an heir." It is in the future tense and in a form where the person acts on himself so the sense.

everlasting -- "Everlasting" is from an adjective tat means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal."

life. -- "Life" means "living" and "existence," but it also "substance" and "property." Since the topic in an inheritance, its meaning as "property  comes more into play.

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "hath" indicate san action completed in the past, but the tense the simple past.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "forsaken" means "left."
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek words translated as "of wife" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "by/for yourselves" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hundredfold" means "many, many times."

NIV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

everyone The word translated as "every one" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. It is in th singular so adding "one" makes sense.

who-- The word translated as "who," more specifically means "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "which soever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

has  -- (WT) This helping verb "has" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past. The tense here is the simple, imperfect past.

left--  "Left" is from a Greek verb that means "to let fall," "to let loose", "to get rid of," and "to leave alone." This is the same word that is translated as "leave" and "forgive" in the New Testament. Though it is a different word that the one used in Mat 19:9 to talk about leaving a wife, the two ideas share many of the same meanings. In the Luke 18:29, a similar verse, this word is translated as "hath left".

houses, -- The Greek word translated as "houses," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house. Notice however that it is plural. This is because a person could be considered to belong his mother's parent's house, his father's parent's house, and the house of an employer.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

brothers, -- The word translated as "brother" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

sisters, "Sisters" is  the feminine form of the previous word that means "sister", "kinswoman," and was a term of endearment for a wife.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

father, -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother, -- "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

or wife, -- (IP) The words for "of wife" does not exist in today's sources. This is important because otherwise, Jesus's lessons would not be consistent. After all, the given that this chapter begins with lessons about marriage, saying that a man cannot leave his wife.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

children, -- The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

fields, -- The primary meaning for "fields" is  a field. Since it is used in the plural, the reference here is to the fields that ninety percent of the people worked to earn their living. Today, we might say "jobs."

for -- This is part of the preposition that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because." This preposition is usually paired with the noun "sake" in English.

my --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "name"-- (MW) The untranslated word "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." Read more about its use in this article.

sake, -- "Sake" is translated from a Greek word that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

receive --  "Receive" is translated from a Greek word that primarily means "take," and has many different uses as we use "take" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing." In English, it is more like our word "get" since it means both taking something and receiving it.

untranslated "by/for yourselves"-- (MW) An untranslated phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "pray by yourself."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

hundred times , -- (WW)The word translated as " hundredfold" is a word that means "many, many times as many." There is not "hundred" in it.

as much -- -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "as much" in the Greek source.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

inherit -- "Inherit" is from a verb that means "inherit", "acquire," and "to be an heir." It is in the future tense and in a form where the person acts on himself so the sense.

eternal-- "Eternal" is from an adjective tat means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal."

life. -- "Life" means "living" and "existence," but it also "substance" and "property." Since the topic in an inheritance, its meaning as "property  comes more into play.

NIV Translation Issues: 

8
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "has" indicate san action completed in the past, but the tense the simple past.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "forsaken" means "left."
  • IP  -- Inserts Phrase-- The Greek words translated as "of wife" existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "name" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "by/for yourselves" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hundred times" means "many, many times."
  • IP  -- Inserts Phrase-- The Greek words translated as "as much" does not exist in the Greek source.

NLT Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

everyone The word translated as "every one" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. It is in th singular so adding "one" makes sense.

who-- The word translated as "who," more specifically means "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "which soever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

has  -- (WT) This helping verb "has" indicates that the verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past. The tense here is the simple, imperfect past.

given up--  "Given up" is from a Greek verb that means "to let fall," "to let loose", "to get rid of," and "to leave alone." This is the same word that is translated as "leave" and "forgive" in the New Testament. Though it is a different word that the one used in Mat 19:9 to talk about leaving a wife, the two ideas share many of the same meanings. In the Luke 18:29, a similar verse, this word is translated as "hath left".

houses, -- The Greek word translated as "houses," in Christ's time, was not only the physical building but the whole household, its members, its property, business interests, and position in the community, all connected to the "name" of the head of the house. Notice however that it is plural. This is because a person could be considered to belong his mother's parent's house, his father's parent's house, and the house of an employer.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

brothers, -- The word translated as "brother" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

sisters, "Sisters" is  the feminine form of the previous word that means "sister", "kinswoman," and was a term of endearment for a wife.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

father, -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

mother, -- "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

children, -- The word translated as "son" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

or -- "Or " is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

property, -- The primary meaning for "property" is  a field. Since it is used in the plural, the reference here is to the fields that ninety percent of the people worked to earn their living. Today, we might say "jobs."

for -- This is part of the preposition that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because." This preposition is usually paired with the noun "sake" in English.

my --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". This pronoun follows the noun so "of mine."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "name"-- (MW) The untranslated word "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss." Read more about its use in this article.

sake, -- "Sake" is translated from a Greek word that means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

receive --  "Receive" is translated from a Greek word that primarily means "take," and has many different uses as we use "take" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing." In English, it is more like our word "get" since it means both taking something and receiving it.

untranslated "by/for yourselves"-- (MW) An untranslated phrase is necessary because the form of the word is a middle voice, which means that the subject is to  act "for yourself" or "pray by yourself."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

hundred times , -- (WW)The word translated as " hundredfold" is a word that means "many, many times as many." There is not "hundred" in it.

as much in return -- -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "as much in return" in the Greek source.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

inherit -- "Inherit" is from a verb that means "inherit", "acquire," and "to be an heir." It is in the future tense and in a form where the person acts on himself so the sense.

eternal-- "Eternal" is from an adjective tat means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal."

life. -- "Life" means "living" and "existence," but it also "substance" and "property." Since the topic in an inheritance, its meaning as "property  comes more into play.

NLT Translation Issues: 

7
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "has" indicate san action completed in the past, but the tense the simple past.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "forsaken" means "left."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "name" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "by/for yourselves" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "hundred times" means "many, many times."
  • IP  -- Inserts Phrase-- The Greek words translated as "as much in return" does not exist in the Greek source.

Front Page Date: 

Feb 10 2020