Matthew 20:18 Behold, we go up to Jerusalem...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

See there? We are going up towards Jerusalem. Not only is the child of humanity going to be handed over to the high priests and intellectuals, but they also are going to condemn

KJV : 

Mat 20:18 Behold, we go up to Jerusalem; and the Son of man shall be betrayed unto the chief priests and unto the scribes, and they shall condemn him to death,

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is a good example of Christ's casual wordplay, choosing words that contrast rising up with being judge down.

"We go up" is from a verb which means "go up", "shoot up," and "ascend." It is also a word that means "ascending to higher knowledge."

The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

Jerusalem is the name of the city. Since it is Aramaic, different spellings are used in Greek.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but in a series, as it appears here, it is best translated as "not only...but also."

The "son of man" is a common phrase used by Jesus, discussed in this article. One good translated is "child of humanity."

"Shall be betrayed" is from a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is usually translated as "delivered up" or "handed over."

"Unto the chief priests" is from a wor that means "arch-priest", "high priest," and "chief priest."

"Scribes" is from a word that generally means a "secretary", "registrar", "recorder," and "scholar." It is used something like we use the word "intellectuals."

"Condemn" is from a verb that means which means "to decide against", "to give a sentence against", "to condemn," "to judge against," and in the passive, "to be judged." The word means literally to "judge down."

"Death" is from the Greek word meaning "death" generally and the death penalty specifically. However, it doesn't appear in all good Greek sources.

The premise of this study is that all of Christ's words were relevant both in the context of his life and as a message to us today. The question is: what is Christ saying to us in this prophesy of his coming death?

One possible interpretation is that whenever Christ is turned over to the head priests and scribes (the academics and the writers), he is going to be criticized to death. In other words, even in our time, when Christ is given over to religious leaders and academics, they will make judgments against him. In other words, Christ only is accepted by individuals, outside of institutions and outside of history. Those with a stake in institutions, even religious institutions, must make decisions that go against Christ.

However, it is not these institutions that kill Christ. For that, he must be turned over to the state. The "gentiles" of Christ's time referred to the state power of Rome, but we can assume that it is any group of non-believers. In our time, it is, of course, the secular state.

So there is a progress here. The institution of religion, in conjunction with the media, makes judgments that are against Christ. This leads, inevitably, to the state or government of non-believers to try to kill Christ. There is a very modern message here. What is really interesting is that this formula words for all eras since Christ, no matter who the religious leaders, the academics, or the state leaders are.

Of course, in the end, Christ always arises again. The term used not only means to rise up himself, but to rouse other people to action. This says it all. Christ cannot die, but nor can he live in institutions. He lives only in the hearts of people that he changes.

The second "and" in the series appears with the sense of "but also."

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "we go up" also means to ascend to higher knowledge. The height of the city is emphasized by the "high" priests, and contrasted with Christ being "judged down" by them." 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἰδοὺ (adv, verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold is from idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see." -- "Behold" is from an adverb meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!"

ἀναβαίνομεν (verb 1st pl pres ind act) "We go up" is from anabaino, which means "go up", "mount", "ascend," [of ships] "go onboard", "rise to speak", "ascend to higher knowledge," [of plants] "shoot up," [of events] "result from," [of a male] "mount," and [of hearts] "enter."

εἰς (prep) "To" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

Ἰεροσόλυμα, (Aramaic) "Jerusalem" is from Hierosolyma, which is the Greek word that denotes the city or its inhabitants.

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

υἱὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child."

τοῦ ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -- The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

παραδοθήσεται (verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be betrayed" is from paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow."

τοῖς ἀρχιερεῦσιν (noun pl masc dat) "Unto the Chief priests" is from archiereus, which means "arch-priest" and "chief priest."

καὶ And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

γραμματεῦσιν, (noun pl masc dat) "Scribes" is from grammateus, which is generally a "secretary", "registrar", "recorder," and "scholar," but specifically means someone who uses gramma which is Greek for "drawings", "a letter," (as in an alphabet)"diagrams," and "letters" (as in correspondence).

καὶ κατακρινοῦσιν (verb 3rd pl fut ind act) "They shall condemn" is from katakrinô (katakrino), which means "to give a sentence against", "to condemn," "to judge against," and in the passive, "to be judged."

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

[θανάτῳ], (noun sg masc dat) "To death" is from thanatos, which means "death" "kinds of death," specifically, "violent death", "corpse," and "a death sentence." --