Matthew 25:44 Then shall they also answer him, saying, Lord,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:44 Then shall they also answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, or athirst, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister unto thee?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

At that time, they shall respond also, their true selves, to him saying, "Lord when did we see you hungry, or thirsty, or strange or naked or sickly or imprisoned and did not serve you?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse repeated, for a final time, most of the vocabulary used in this story. However, there is a surprising addition and some other hidden stuff.

The word translated as "they" here is surprising. Usually, this word comes from the form of the verb, but here a specific word is used. Since the idea is part of the verb, this is only done to emphasize the subject, especially since it appears after the verb, acting like a repetition. The word used is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

"Shall...answer" is a verb that means to "set apart," "choose", "answer" a question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself."

The Greek word translated as "also" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also")

The word translated as "saying" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak." It is in the form of a participle, "saying" and "speaking."

The Greek word translated as "lord," means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of" and means "lord" or "master."

The verb translated as "saw we" means "to see" but it is usually used like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive."

The "an hungered" here is the same verb translated as "hungered" in Mat 25:35, but here it is in the form of an adjective, "hungering."

The word for "athirst" is the same word used in Mat 25:35 that means "to be thirsty" or, more generally, "to want" or "lack" anything. It is in the form of an adjective, "thirsting."

"Stranger" is not the common word for "stranger" that has more of the sense of "foreign". It is a more specific noun which means "guest-friend", specifically meaning someone who should receive hospitality, so a "stranger", or "refugee". However, the word also means some that is a "stranger to a thing", "ignorant of a thing", and "unusual".

The word for "naked" means both "naked" and "destitute." It also means bald and beardless.

The word used for "sick" is also an uncommon one despite all of Christ's work healing, he only uses it once before. It the previous verses, it was a verb, but here it is an adjective meaning "to be weak or sickly."

"Prison" is a word that means a "watcher", "guard", "chain", "keeper," and "a place where people are watched." Christ uses it to clearly mean prison elsewhere.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

The term uses here for "did...minister" means "to minister", "to do service," and "to render a service." It is a new term used in this story, used to summarize all the other terms of service. It is first used by Christ as a description of his purpose on earth. It is a verb from a noun that means "servant" and as an adjective, "servile" and "menial." In Christ's period, this later term was also used to indicate an attendant or official at a temple. It is the source word for the English term "deacon."

Greek Vocabulary: 

τότε "Then" is from tote, which means "at that time" and "then."

ἀποκριθήσονται (verb 3rd pl fut ind pass) "Shall answer" is from apokrinomai that means to "set apart," "choose", "exclude," "reject on examination", "decide", "answer" the question, "answer charges," and "defend oneself" and, in the passive, "to be parted or separated." In the Gospels, it is always translated as "answered."

καὶ "Also" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

αὐτοὶ (adj pl masc nom) "They" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

λέγοντες λέγοντες (part pl pres act masc nom) "Saying" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

Κύριε, (noun sg masc voc) "Lord" is from kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

πότε (part) "When" comes from pote, which means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

σε (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from su which means "you" and "your."

εἴδομεν (1st pl aor act ind) "Saw we" is from eido which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

πεινῶντα (part sg pres act masc acc) "An hungered" is peinaô (peino), which means "to be hungry", "crave after," or "to be starved," and it is a metaphor for desire and cravings.

"Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primary "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

διψῶντα (part sg pres act masc acc) "Athirst" is from dipsao, which means "to thirst", "to be thirsty," "to be parched", "to be in want of", "to lack," and "to thirst after" a thing.

"Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primary "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

ξένον [uncommon] (noun sg masc acc) "Stranger" is from xenos, which means "guest-friend" in the sense of someone from a friendly country, 'visitor," "stranger",:wander:, "refugee", "stranger to a thing", "ignorant of a thing", and "unusual".

"Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primary "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

γυμνὸν [uncommon](adj sg masc acc) "Naked" is from gymnos, which means "naked", "unclad", "unarmed", "stripped" of a thing, "lightly clad", of facts, "bald", "destitute", and "beardless".

"Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primary "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

ἀσθενῆ [uncommon](adj sg masc nom) "Sick" is from asthenes, which means "without strength," "weak, in body "feeble", "sickly", in power, "weak", "feeble", in property, "weak", "poor", and "insignificant." It could be the verb (meaning "to be weak" or "to be sickly") used in the earlier verse, but it would be in the second person, singular, "You are/were weak/sickly." So it doesn't fit.

"Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primary "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

φυλακῇ (noun sg fem dat) "Prison" is from phylake, which means "a watching or guarding", "a guard", "a ward", "a watch", " "a station", "a post," "a keeping", "a preserving", "safekeeping", "a safe-guard," and "a precaution."

καὶ"And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

διηκονήσαμέν (verb 1st pl aor ind act) "Minister" is diakoneô, which "to act as a servant", "to minister," and "to perform services."

σοι;

The Spoken Version: 

"At that time, they are going to respond also," he continued, returning to his normal, narrative voice, their true selves, to him saying..."

Here, he paused and moved to the group of followers on the left, playing the goats facing the king.

"Lord," he said, using a voice that sounded a lot like his imitation of the academics and elites, "when did we see you hungry, or thirsty, or a refugee or uncovered or sickly or imprisoned and did not serve you?"

At the word "serve", he made an obsequious bow toward his place as king.

Oct 31 2016