John 10:18 No man taketh it from me,

KJV Verse: 

Jhn 10:18 No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

No one has lifted it [my spirit] from me. Howev er, I put it out from myself. I maintain the permission to have put it out and I maintain the permission to have gotten it back. I have gotten this direction from my Father.

Hidden Meaning: 

The standard translation here has this referring to Christ's death and resurrection, but as in the previous verse, Christ does not appear to be talking about giving his life but spreading his spirit.

In the KJV, two different Greek words are translated as "take" while the same Greek word is translated as both "take" and "receive." While the English version making these 'adjustments' makes sense, it is not really what Christ was trying to say, at least, if we assume he wouldn't use different words to capture the same idea and the same word to express to different ideas.

The first word translated as "take" primarily means "to lift up." It is often translated as "to raise up" as in the NT, but it also means "to life up and carry off" in the sense that we use the term "shop-lifting." This does not seem like a word you would use to refer to your physical life but one that you would use to refer to people stealing your spiritual force.

Christ references to his power both refer to verbs that are in the aorist tense, which is usually translated as the past. On the surface, this seems to refer both to past events of putting out spirit and getting it back again not to a future death and resurrection.

The same Greek word is translated in this verse as both "take" and "receive" in the KJV. In the alternative, we makes the statement more consistent by translating that word (lambano) as "gotten." Again, it seems to work better to refer to Christ's getting spirit and orders from his Father.

Vocabulary: 

οὐδεὶς "No man" is from oudeis, (oudeis) which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

ἦρεν 3rd sg aor ind act) "Taketh" is from aeirô (airo), which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove."

αὐτὴν "It" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

ἀπ᾽ "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

ἐμοῦ, "Me" is from emou, which means "me", and "mine".

ἀλλ᾽ "But" is from alla (alla), which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

τίθημι (1st sg pres ind act) "Lay...down" is from tithêmi (tithemi) which means "to put", "to place", "to propose", "to suggest", "o deposit", "to set up", "to dedicate", "to assign", "to award", "to agree upon", "to institute", "to establish", "to make", "to work", "to prepare oneself," and a metaphor for "to put in one's mind." In a military sense, it means both "to bear arms" and "to lay down and surrender." It also means to "lay in a grave," and "bury." In writing, it means putting words on paper.

αὐτὴν "It" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

ἀπ᾽ "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

ἐμαυτοῦ. "Myself" is from emautou, which means "of me," and "of myself".

ἐξουσίαν "Power" is from exousia ( exousia ), which means "control", "the power of choice", "permission", "the power of authority", "the right of privilege", "abundance of means," and "abuse of power."

ἔχω (1st sg pres ind act) "I have" is from echô (echo), which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

θεῖναι , (aor inf act) "To lay...down" is from tithêmi (tithemi) which means "to put", "to place", "to propose", "to suggest", "to deposit", "to set up", "to dedicate", "to assign", "to award", "to agree upon", "to institute", "to establish", "to make", "to work", "to prepare oneself," and a metaphor for "to put in one's mind." In a military sense, it means both "to bear arms" and "to lay down and surrender." It also means to "lay in a grave," and "bury." In writing, it means putting words on paper.

αὐτήν "It" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐξουσίαν "Power" is from exousia ( exousia ), which means "control", "the power of choice", "permission", "the power of authority", "the right of privilege", "abundance of means," and "abuse of power."

ἔχω (1st sg pres ind act) "I have" is from echô (echo), which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

πάλιν "Again" is from palin (palin), which means "back", "backward", "contradiction", "again", "once more," and "in turn."

λαβεῖν (aor inf act) "To take" is from lambanô (lambano) means "to take", "to receive", "to apprehend with the senses", "to take hold of," and "to seize." It is also specifically used to mean seized with emotion.

αὐτήν: "It" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

ταύτην "This" is from tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why."

τὴν ἐντολὴν "Commandments" is from entolê (entole) which means "injunction", "order," and "command."

ἔλαβον (1st sg aor ind act) "Have I received," is from lambanô (lambano) means "to take", "to receive", "to apprehend with the senses", "to take hold of," and "to seize." It is also specifically used to mean seized with emotion.

"Of" is from para (para), which means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond", "parallel (geometry)", "like (metaphor)", "a parody of (metaphor)", "precisely at the moment of (time)," and "throughout (time)."

"The Father" is from pater (pater), which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

"My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

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