Luke 11:2 When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in heaven,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 11:2 When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

When you pray, Father, it must be treated as sacred the name of yours. It must start, this kingship of yours.

Hidden Meaning: 

There are a number of differences between this verse and the Greek source used today. The Greek verse doesn't include the "which are in heaven" section that appears in Matthew 6:9. nor does the Greek include in "thy will be done" phrase that appears in Matthew 6:10. The other difference from Matthew is the beginning of the verse. Other than the beginning, the vocabulary is the same as Matthew. 

The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

The verb "to pray" is in a form that could be a command or a simple statement. The verb is plural, which is a change from the previous verb ("ask") at the end of the last verse, Mat 6:8, which was singular. In this speech, we see Jesus switching The verb is in a form where the subject acts on themselves or for their own benefit, so "pray for yourselves" or "you pray for yourselves".

The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak."

"Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor. When referring to others, Christ uses it to refer to their ancestors, that is, "forefathers."

The Greek verb translated as "hallowed be" means "to dedicate to God" and "to sanctify" usually by burning an offering. In this sense, this can mean holy or sacred, but it also means accursed. Another way to think about this word is that it describes something set apart only for God. It is a passive form, so "be sanctified". It is in a form that commands that something happen, which is usually translated with "let" in English as in, "let it be sanctified" but most English speakers use the verb "must" to capture this idea.

The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the things itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

Christ's use of the word "name" is especially complicated because uses the term all these ways and possibly more. In this case, is he referring to the term "Father in the heavens" or the "I am that am" name? In places in John, such as John 17:6, Christ describes himself as "manifesting" God's name. He also describes himself as "keeping" his followers in God's name, John 17:12.

The form of the "you" pronoun is possessive. Christ uses it in his "the name of yours" or "that name of yours" since the article "the" in Greek is a form of the word "this" or "that". 

The word translated as "thy kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Though it is the subject of the verb, in the Greek, it follows it. Christ does not seem to mean the region of a reign because this word is described as moving in some way. This limits its meaning to something such as a "reign". This meaning is reinforced by the second part of this verse because the "reign" of a king extends from the execution of his will. The "thy" is Christ's normal form of appearing after the word rather than before.

The Greek word translated as "come" means primarily to "start" and "to set out". It referring to movement, it means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. It doesn't imply a direction as "come" implies most toward the speaker and "go" implies moving away from the speaker. It certainly doesn't have the meaning of "come into being" which seems to be the implication of the KJV "come" translation. The word that specifically means "come into being" in Greek begins the next phrase. When not meaning "to begin" or "start", this word it is often best translated of "makes its way" or "being underway" in English so that it doesn't imply a direction. This word is in the form of a command addressed to an object, which is a form we don't have in English. this is usually translated as a command to "let" something occur, but this weakens the authority of this statement. We usually make these statements in the form of something that "must" happen. The tense of the verb indicates something that happens at a specific time.

The word translated as "thy kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Though it is the subject of the verb, in the Greek, it follows it, meaning it is less important. In English, our word "kingship" comes closest to the bread of this idea since it encompasses the realm, the power, and the reign of a king. 

The "thy" appears after the word rather than before. The form is "the kingship of yours" or "that kingship of your" since the article, "the", is closer to a demonstrative, "this" or "that". 

The Greek word translated as "come" means primarily to "start" and "to set out". It referring to movement, it means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. It doesn't imply a direction as "come" implies most toward the speaker and "go" implies moving away from the speaker. It certainly doesn't have the meaning of "come into being" which seems to be the implication of the KJV "come" translation. The word that specifically means "come into being" in Greek begins the next phrase.

When not meaning "to begin" or "start", this word it is often best translated of "makes its way" or "being underway" in English so that it doesn't imply a direction. During Christ's life, "start" seems to be most appropriate, but today perhaps "is underway" is best.

This word is in the form of a command addressed to an object, which is a form we don't have in English. this is usually translated as a command to "let" something occur, but this weakens the authority of this statement. We usually make these statements in the form of something that "must" happen. The tense of the verb indicates something that happens at a specific time. So, "must start" or "must be underway. 

So the first part of this verse is closer to "It must start, the kingship of yours."

Vocabulary: 

Ὅταν (adv/conj) "When" is from hotan, which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)." 

προσεύχησθε,  (verb 2nd pl pres/imp ind mp ) "Ye pray" is from proseuchomai, which means "to offer prayers or vows", "to worship," and "to pray for a thing. It is the combination of two Greek word, pros, meaning "towards" or "by reason of," and euchomai, meaning "to pray to God."

λέγετε (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Say" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." 

Πάτερ, (noun sg masc voc) "Father" is from pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

ἁγιασθήτω (3rd sg aor imperat pass) "Hallowed be" is from is hagiazo, which means "to separate from profane things and dedicate to God", "to dedicate people to God", "to purify," and "to cleanse externally or internally." This may be a special form of hagizo which means "to hallow", "to dedicate," and "to make sacred," commonly by burning a sacrifice.

τὸ ὄνομά (noun sg neut nom) "Name" is from onoma, which means "name", "fame", "a name and nothing else [as opposed to a real person]", "a phrase", "an expression", "a technical term", "a word," and, in expressions indicating doubt, "a false name", "a pretense," or "a pretext".

σου: (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

ἐλθάτω (3rd sg aor imperat act) "Come" is from erchomai, which means to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom ) "Kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," "being ruled by a king (passive)," and "a reign."

σου, (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

Related Verses: 

Feb 5 2018