Luke 11:48 Truly ye bear witness that ye allow the deeds of your fathers:

KJV Verse: 

Luk 11:48 Truly ye bear witness that ye allow the deeds of your fathers: for they indeed killed them, and ye build their sepulchres.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

So it is true that a witness you are and you agree with those fathers of yours because they truly killed them. Your yourselves construct a house. 

Hidden Meaning: 

There is no "sepulchers" in the Greek. There is also no verb "bear witness" in the Greek source. The Greek again is simpler and more pithy. 

The verb "ye are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

"Witness" is  martys,  the source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The Greek verb translated as "ye allow" means "join in approving", "give one's consent", "consent or agree to", and  "agree or sympathize with". The form of "the deeds" indicates the meaning is "you agree with". 

The Greek word translated as "works" means "deeds", "actions," and "things" in the sense of "everything."

The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Christ's listeners.

"Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor. When referring to others, Christ uses it to refer to their ancestors, that is, "forefathers."

The Greek source of "for" is a word that means "that" or "because." 

The word translated as "they" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

The "indeed" here is a particle, which. when used alone. expresses certainty, "truly" and "certainly". However, when used with the conjunction translated here as "but" take on the meaning "one one hand..." with the "on the other hand" identified by the "but" phrase.

"Killed" is translated from a Greek word that means "destroy" more than just "kill" because the base word means "slay." The Greek source has the sense of "kill off," that is, destroy in a more thorough way. When we talk about "destroying" someone, we use it to mean destroying their reputation, the strength of their spirit and ideas as well as physically killing them. this is more the sense here.

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

"Build" is a word that specifically means "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify." 

There is no "sepulchers" in the Greek. It is added because the sense of the verb is "build houses". 

Wordplay: 

A play on the previous verse where the verb translated as "build" was related to memorials, but here it is related to houses because it doesn't have an object. 

Vocabulary: 

ἄρα (partic) "Truly" is ara, which means "there and then", "straightway", "then", "next", "mark you!", "for this cause", "so true is it that," and "namely." 

μάρτυρές [uncommon](noun pl masc nom) "Witness" is martus, which means "witness," and martyr." 

ἐστε (verb 2nd pl pres ind act ) "Ye are" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

συνευδοκεῖτε  [unique](verb 2nd pl pres ind ac) "Ye allow" is  syneudokeo, which means "join in approving", "give one's consent", "consent or agree to", and (pers, dat) "agree or sympathize with"

τοῖς ἔργοις (noun pl neut dat) "The deeds" is from ergon (ergon ), which means "works", "tasks", "deeds", "actions", "thing," and "matter."

τῶν πατέρων (noun pl masc gen) "The Father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." 

ὑμῶν, (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." 

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

αὐτοὶ (adj sg masc nom) "They" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

μὲν (partic) "Indeed" is men, which is generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly." Used with the conjunction de, as it is here, it points out the specific word being contrast after the conjunction. In English, we usually say, one one hand...on the others... See the article here for specific uses with other particles. 

ἀπέκτειναν  (verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Killed" is apokteino, which means "to kill," and "to slay." It combines the word for "to slay" (kteino) with the proposition, apo, indicating separation, meaning "from" or "away from."but it is a stronger form than the normal verb kteino. It is more like our "destroy." It is in the form of a present participle, "destroying" acting as a noun ("those destroying"). 

αὐτοὺς (adj sg masc acc) "Them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) "Ye" is hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you." 

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

οἰκοδομεῖτε. (verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Build" is oikodomeo,which means to "build a house," generally, "build", "fashion," "found upon," and, metaphorically, "build up," and "edify."

Related Verses: 

Mar 15 2018