Luke 11:5 Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him at midnight

KJV Verse: 

Luk 11:5 Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him at midnight, and say unto him, Friend, lend me three loaves;

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Anyone out of you all is going to have a friend and 

Hidden Meaning: 

The verse is pretty straightforward, but it contains one unique word with a lot of meanings.

The Greek word translated as "which" in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." In the plural, it means "some", "they," and "those." When referring to a person it is a general reference as we would use the phrase "so and so".  -- The word translated as "what" means primarily means "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

The word translated as "your" is plural addressing all of Christ's listeners.

The word translated as "shall have" means "to possess" or "to keep". It is in the future tense. 

The term translated as "a friend" is one of three or four words in Greek for "love". This is usually described as "brotherly love". It is in the form of an adjective used as a noun. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The Greek verb translated as "shall go" isn't the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT but it is often translated that way. This word means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." This word, however, uniquely means both "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life." 

The word translated as "unto" means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against."

The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same".

"At midnight" is from an uncommon Greek word which means "at midnight" or "of midnight", meaning literally "middle of the night". 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"Say" is means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same".

The term translated as "friend" is the same word as above but used in the form of an address. 

A unique word is translated as "lend" that means "proclaim", "declare", "foretold by an oracle", "consult an oracle", and a lot of other meanings depending on the context. When referring to objects it can be either lend or borrow, but in a friendly way. 

The "me" is in the indirect object, which has more uses in Greek than English. 

"Three" is the word from describing the numeral three. 

The word translated as "loaves" means "small loaf or cake of bread". It is more like a slice of bread today. It is the word almost always translated as "bread" in the NT. 

Vocabulary: 

Τίς (pron sg masc nom) "What" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what." 

ἐξ (prep) "Of" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from." 

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "You" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." 

ἕξει (verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Shall have" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." 

φίλον (adj sg masc acc) "Friend" is from philos, which as an adjective means "loved", "beloved", "dear", "kith and kin", "nearest and dearest", "friends," and (of things) "welcome" and "pleasant."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

πορεύσεται (verb 3rd sg fut ind mid) "Shall go" is poreuomai (poreuô) which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT.

πρὸς (prep) "Unto" is pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before." --

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

μεσονυκτίου [uncommon](adj sg neut gen)  "At midnight" is from mesonyktion, which means "at midnight" or "of midnight."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

εἴπῃ (verb 3rd sg aor subj act) "Say" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." 

αὐτῷ (adj sg masc dat) "Unto him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

Φίλε, (adj sg masc voc) "Friend" is from philos, which as an adjective means "loved", "beloved", "dear", "kith and kin", "nearest and dearest", "friends," and (of things) "welcome" and "pleasant."

χρῆσόν [unique](verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Lend" is  kichremi, which means "proclaim", "declare", "foretold by an oracle", "consult an oracle", "furnish" a thing, "lend" in a friendly way, "borrow", "to lack", "use", "to use money", "experience", "suffer", "treat", "deal with" friends, "to be intimate with a man",  referring to sexual intercourse, and so on. 

μοι (pron 1st sg dat) "Me" is moi, which means "I", "me", and "my". 

τρεῖς (numeral pl fem acc) "Three" is from treis, which means the number three. -- 

ἄρτους, (noun pl masc acc) "Loaves" is artos, which means specifically a "cake of whole wheat bread," and generally "loaf," and "bread." 

Feb 8 2018