Matthew 23:6 And love the uppermost rooms at feasts,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 23:6 And love the uppermost rooms at feasts, and the chief seats in the synagogues,

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

They embrace, however, the best recliners in meals and the front seats at meatings.

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse continues to use words that are uncommon for Christ to use. However, here, the words are very simple and easy to understand. The Greek is somewhat confused in translation, however.

"They love" is from the Greek word that many normally described as "brotherly love." It's meaning is more like "like" that "love" in English. More on the two Greek word translated as "love" in this article.

The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. This continues the pattern of this group of verses in connecting the authority of the Pharisees with their shortcomings in a way that undermines it.

"Uppermost rooms" is from a word that means "foremost recliners" describing the best or initial recliners at a table for eating.

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

"Feasts" is from a word that means "a meal", "noonday meal," and, generally, "food."

The Greek word for "chief seats" comes from Greek words which literally means "best seats". It has the same prefix as the previous words, which means "highest", "best," or "foremost." We would probably say "front seats."

The Greek word translated as "synagogues" is the source of our English word. It simply means an assembly. meeting, or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together." Instead of translating it, the KJV simply uses the Greek word.

Wordplay: 

And emphasis on the word for "first" and "foremost", repeating it as the prefix of two words. 

Vocabulary: 

φιλοῦσι (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "They love" is from phileo , which means "to love", "to regard with affection", "to kiss," and "to approve of."

δὲ "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

τὴν πρωτοκλισίαν [uncommon] (noun sg fem acc) "Uppermost rooms" is from protoklisia, which means "first seat at table," literally "foremost couches." The prefix in this word means "first" and "highest" from protos. In place, this means "the foremost." In order, it means "the first." Of rank or degree, it means "the highest" or "the best." It's root is klisia, which means "a place for lying down or reclining", "anything for lying or sitting upon," a "couch for reclining at a table", "nuptial bed," and a "company" of people reclining at meals.

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τοῖς δείπνοις [uncommon] (noun pl masc dat) "Feasts" is from deipnon, which means "a meal", "noonday meal," and, generally, "food."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὰς πρωτοκαθεδρίας [uncommon] (noun pl fem acc) "Chief seats" comes from protokathedria which literally means "first seats." The prefix in this word means "first" and "highest" from protos. In place, this means "the foremost." In order, it means "the first." Of rank or degree, it means "the highest" or "the best." It's root is kathedra, which means a "seat" to sit on, the "posterior," the "sitting posture", "sitting idle", "inaction," the "chair of a teacher," and "a throne."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

ταῖς συναγωγαῖς (noun pl fem dat) "Synagogues" is from synagoge, which means a "bringing together", "assembly", "place of assembly", "contracting", "collection", "combination", "conclusion," and "demonstration." It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

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