Matthew 24:21 For then shall be great tribulation,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 24:21 For then shall be great tribulation, such as was not since the beginning of the world to this time, no, nor ever shall be.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Because there is then going to be great pressure such as has not really come into being from the earliest of the world order to the one now. But not, never, is it .going to come into being.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Another verse that is easier to understand if spoken. Also, the "tribulation" here seems to be better described as pressure on the world order.

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation. To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

When the verb "shall be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

The word translated as "great" means "big", "high" "great," and "impressive."

The Greek word translated as "tribulation" means "pressure", "crushing," and "oppression."\

"Such as" is an adjective that means "such as", "as it were", and "so to speak."

The word translated as "was" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

"Was" is from the Greek word that means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" which indicates existence in the same state.

The word translated as "since" means "from" in both location and time and when referring to a source.

"The beginning" is translated from a Greek word that means "beginning", "origin", and a lot of other ways of expressing the source of things. this is the word from which we get both "archbishop," head bishops who can consecrate other bishops, and "archeology," the study of ancient history.

The word translated as "of the world" is not the same word translated as world in "the end of the world" from the beginning of this chapter (Mat 24:3). Christ uses to this world to refer to the world order, that is, human organization, While the earlier word refers to the "age" or "era."

The word translated as "to" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

The word translated as "this" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek word translated as "time" is not a noun, but the adverb meaning "now".

"No" is from a Greek negative meaning "but not" and as both parts of "neither...nor."

The "not ever" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "never."

The word translated as "shall be" at the end of the verse is not the same word that was translated as "shall be" at its beginning. This "shall be" is the future form of the word translated as "war" earlier, that means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἔσται (verb 3rd sg fut ind) "Shall be" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

τότε "Then" is from tote, which means "at that time" and "then."

θλίψις (noun sg fem nom ) "Tribulation" is from thlipsis, which means "pressure", "crushing," and "oppression."\

μεγάλη adj sg fem nom) "Great" is from megas, which means "big", "full-grown", "vast", "high", "great", "mighty", "strong (of the elements)","loud" (of sounds), "over-great (with a bad sense), "impressive" (of style), and "long" ( of days).

οἵα [uncommon](adj sg fem nom ) "Such as" is from oia, which means "such as", "of what sort", "so and so'" "fit", "able", "as", "just as", "for instance", "that is to say", "as it were", and "so to speak."

οὐ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -

γέγονεν (verb 3rd sg perf ind act) "Was" is from ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

ἀπ᾽ "Since" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source. "Was" is from ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

ἀρχῆς (noun sg fem gen) "The beginning" is from arche, which means "beginning", "origin", "first principles", "first place of power", "empire", "command," "heavenly power", "power of evil," and a lot of other ways of expressing the source of thins. this is the word from which we get both "archbishop," head bishops who can consecrate other bishops, and "archeology," the study of ancient history.

κόσμου (noun sg masc gen) "Of the world" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." It is a form of the is verb kosmeô, which means "to order", "to arrange", "to rule", "to adorn" (especially women), and "to equip." It especially means controlling and arranging an army. -- Christ uses the word translated as "the world" to mean "the world order," specifically the powers-that-be. More about this word in this article about related words.

ἕως (conj) "To" is from heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that." -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "This" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "who" is from the Greek article, "the," (masculine, possessive form) which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." It could also be a demonstrative pronoun, that often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

νῦν (adv) "Time" is from nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is."

οὐδ᾽"No" is from oude , which means "but not", "neither", "nor,"and "not even." -- "Neither" is from a Greek negative meaning "but not" and as both parts of "neither...nor."

οὐ μὴ "Nor ever" is from ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -- The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

γένηται. (verb 3rd sg aor subj) "Shall be" is from ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state. -- The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.

The Spoken Version: 

"Because," he explained. "There is going to be then a great pressure."

He demonstrated by pressing together his hands.

"As hasn't really come into being," he continued. "from the earliest earthly powers until the one now."

He gestured indicating the city beyond them.

"No," he emphasized. "Never."

"But," he continued. "It is going to come into being."

Jul 28 2016