Matthew 24:22 And except those days should be shortened,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And if not cut short, the days, those ones, not possibly be rescued all flesh. Through, however, the chosen, the days there shall be cut short.

KJV : 

Mat 24:22 And except those days should be shortened, there should no flesh be saved: but for the elect's sake those days shall be shortened.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The colorful wordplay of this verse is lost in translation. The "these days, those ones" is repeated in a dramatic or poetic style. The term translated twice as "shortened" means to prune a tree or clip a bird's wings. A word meaning "all" is not translated.

The preposition translated as "for" in the phrase "for the elect" should be translated as "through" or "by." This preposition is not the ways purposes are stated in Greek.

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "shortened" means "clipped short." 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

εἰ μὴ (conj/partic) "Except" is from ei me, which is the conjunction that means "if not", "but," and "except." εἰ is the particle use with the imperative usually to express conditions "if" or indirect questions, "whether." (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no."

ἐκολοβώθησαν [2 verses](verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "Should be shortened" is from koloboô, which means "to dock", "to curtail," and "to mutilate." Kolobôsis means "mutilation."

αἱ (article pl fem nom) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἡμέραι (noun pl fem nom) "Days" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

ἐκεῖναι, (adj pl fem nom) "Those" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

οὐκ (partic)  "No" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἂν (partic) "Should" is from an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

ἐσώθη (verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "There...be saved" is sozo (soizo), which means "save from death", "keep alive", "keep safe", "preserve", "maintain", "keep in mind", "carry off safely," and "rescue." This is the 3rd person, singular, aortic, passive form.

πᾶσα (adj sg fem nom) Untranslated is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." -- The word translated as "all" is from the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "every thing."

σάρξ: (noun sg fem nom) "The flesh" is from sarx (sarx), which means "flesh", "the body", "fleshy", "the pulp of fruit", "meat," and "the physical and natural order of things" (opposite of the spiritual or supernatural).

διὰ "For" is from dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between." -

δὲ (conj) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

τοὺς (article pl masc acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἐκλεκτοὺς (adj pl masc acc) "The elect's sake" is from eklektos, which means "picked out", "select", "choice," and "pure."

κολοβωθήσονται [2 verses](verb 3rd pl fut ind pass) "Should be shortened" is from koloboô, which means "to dock", "to curtail," and "to mutilate." Kolobôsis means "mutilation."

αἱ (article pl fem nom) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἡμέραι (noun pl fem nom) "Days" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

ἐκεῖναι. (adj pl fem nom) "Those" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

KJV Analysis: 

And The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

except -- The two Greek words translated as "except" mean "if not." The not is an expression of doubt.

those The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." This word appears after "days."

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

days -- The Greek word translated as "days" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

should -- This helping verb "should" usually indicates the future tense or a verb form that indicates something is possible, but this verb has neither of those characteristics. The tense of the verb indicates a point in time that could be past, present, or future and, because of the context, we might interpret it as the future. 

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

shortened, --  "Shortened" is from a word that means "to curtail" from a base meaning "to prune" tree or "to clip" a bird's wings.

there -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

should -- "Should" is from a word that limits the verb by circumstances. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have" or "might."

no -- The Greek word translated as "no" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

untranslated -- -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. The form matches the following word "flesh."

flesh -- The Greek word translated as "flesh" means "flesh", "meat," and "the physical order of things" as opposed to the spiritual. It is often contrasted it with the Greek word translated as "spirit," so he usually uses it in the later sense.

be  -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

saved: -- "Saved" is from the Greek word that means "to keep alive" when applied to people or "to keep safe" when applied to things. Christ uses it to mean "rescue" in most cases.

but The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow. The word following here is what is translated as "the elect sake."

for -- The word translated as "for" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

elect's -- The word translated as "the elect's sake" is Greek for "the chosen" or "the pure." Greek has a specific word that is used to say "sake" in this sense, but it is not used here.

sake  -- There are no Greek words that can be translated as "sake" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. There is a word that Jesus commonly uses the means "sake."

those The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there." This word appears after "days."

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

days -- The Greek word translated as "days" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

shall -- -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the following verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English. This is the same verb form that is translated as "should" above.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

shortened, "Shortened" is from a word that means "to curtail" from a base meaning "to prune" tree or "to clip" a bird's wings.

The Spoken Version: 

"And no doubt," he continued. "if those times are not clipped short."

He illustrated the idea by working his hand as if he was using a pair of shears.

"Everything physical could not keep its life," he said, patting his chest emphasizing the word "physical."

"Though, however," he continued. "The chosen..."

He gestured to indicate the followers around him.

"Those time are going to be clipped short," he finished, with a final snip of his fingers.

Front Page Date: 

Jul 29 2016