Matthew 26:18 Go into the city to such a man,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 26:18 Go into the city to such a man, and say unto him, The Master saith, My time is at hand; I will keep the passover at thy house with my disciples.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Go off into the city to so-and-so and tell him that the teacher said, "My time is very near. Dependent on you, I am preparing the feast of Passover with my apprentices."

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The interesting things about this verse is that Christ refers to himself as the master teacher and his followers as his students.

"Go" is from a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

The Greek word for "city" meant not only a city but a nation, culture, or a society. It worked something like the word "community" today.

The word translated as "to" means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against." It is a different word than the earlier "into."

Christ saw his relationship with his apostles (and with us?) primarily that of a teacher with his students. His "job" as teaching them how to teach others. Other people provided support, like this man in the city, but the apostles were full-time students.

The Greek word translated as "such a man" means "so-and-so". It is a placeholder for someone's name.

"Say" is from means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

"Master" is translated from a Greek word that means "teacher," and "trainer." It is usually translated as "Master" in the KJV, but "teacher" in newer Gospels. The main sense is always "teacher."

The word translated as "saith" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

"Time" is from a noun that means "due measure", "season", "opportunity", "time," and "profit."

The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

"At hand" is from an adverb that means "near", "nigh", "at hand." In English, we would say something like "almost here."

The Greek word translated as "I will keep" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It is usually translated as "to do" in the Gospels. Here, it has the sense of "prepare." It is not in the future tense, but the present.

"The Passover" is from a noun the refers to the feast of the Passover.

The word translated as "at" means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against." It is the same word translated as "to" above. It has a lot of specialized meanings, but the only one that seems to fit the context is the sense of "dependent on". The sense is not that Christ was using his house but that this man could be depended on to make the needed arrangements.

"Your house" is from pronoun "you." There is no "house" here at all. This phrase "at thy house" is something close to "to you."

"Disciples" is from a word that means "learner", "pupil", "apprentice," and "student."

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ὑπάγετε (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act "Go" is from hupago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you." -- "Go your way" is from a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

εἰς "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν πόλιν (noun sg fem acc) "City" is from polis, which means "city", "citadel", "one's city", "one's country", "community", "state", "state affairs," and "civic duties."

πρὸς "To" is from pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before."

τὸν δεῖνα [uncommon] (noun sg masc acc ) "Such a man" is from deina (deina), which means "such a one," or "so-and-so."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εἴπατε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Say" is from eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."

αὐτῷ (adj sg matasc d) "Unto him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

διδάσκαλος (noun sg masc nom) "Master" is from didaskalos, which means "teacher", "master", "trainer," and "producer." --

λέγει (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Saith" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

καιρός (noun sg masc nom) "Time" is from kairos, which means "due measure", "proportion", "fitness", "exact time", "season", "opportunity", "time", "critical times", "advantage," and "profit." --

μου (noun sg masc gen) "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

ἐγγύς "At hand" is from an adverb eggys, which means 1) (of place) "near", "nigh", "at hand," 2) (of time) "nigh at hand" 3) (of numbers) "nearly", "almost", "coming near," and 4) (of relationship) "akin to."

ἐστιν: (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

πρὸς "At" is from pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before." --

σὲ (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thy house" is from sou which means "you" and "your."

ποιῶ (verb 1st sg pres ind act) "I will keep" is from poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do." --

τὸ πάσχα (irreg sg neut acc) "The feast of passover" is from pascha, which means the "paschal feast."

μετὰ "With" is from meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward." -- "After" is from the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It is not the term usually translated as "after."

τῶν μαθητῶν (noun pl masc gen) "Disciples" is from mathetes which means "learner", "pupil", "apprentice," and "student."

μου.(noun sg masc gen) "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

The Spoken Version: 

"Go off into the city to so-and-so," he instructed, "and tell him that the teacher said, 'My time is very near. Dependent on you, I am preparing the feast of Passover with my apprentices.'"

Related Verses: 

Nov 8 2016