John 13:10 He that is washed needeth not

KJV Verse: 

Jhn 13:10 He that is washed needeth not save to wash his feet, but is clean every whit: and ye are clean, but not all.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Anyone bathing doesn't have a need to wash up, p[ause] except the feet. Otherwise, he is entirely clean as you all are clean, [pause] but not really all of you.

Hidden Meaning: 

Again, there are two different Greek words translated as "wash" here. The first, luou, means to wash the entire body. In English this is the idea of bathing. The second, nipto, means to wash your hands or feet. In English, we say "wash up" to convey this more limited cleaning.

The two words translated as "save not" mean literally "if not." In English, we would say "except." This seems to be a side remark because Christ is in the process of washing the apostle's feet.

When the word translated as "and" means "as" when used in a comparison. Here the comparison is between some who has bathed and it clean with the apostles, who are also clean. The "you" in this phase is plural, referring not just to Peter, but to everyone present as we might say "you all" in English to encompass the whole group, not just the one who started the conversation.

Finally, this verse ends on something of a play on words. Christ has said described someone as "entirely" clean, using a Greek word holos, that means "whole" or "entire." He then say offers another aside saying "not all" and the Greek word for "all" also means "whole." Again, the "all" is plural, referring to the group of apostles. So this is a play of the idea of being entirely clean but not being all clean As John explains in the next verse, this refers to Judas.

Wordplay: 

 A play of the idea of being entirely clean but not being all clean 

Vocabulary: 

λελουμένος (part sg perf mp masc nom) "He that is washed" is from luou, which "to wash", "to wash the body", "to bathe," and is a metaphor for "to purify."

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔχει ( 3rd sg pres ind act) "Have" is from echô (echo), which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

χρείαν "Need" is from chreia (chreia ), which means "need", "want", "poverty", "a request of a necessity", "business", "military service", "a business affair", "employment", "familiarity", "intimacy," and "maxim."

[εἰ "Save" is from ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions.

μὴ "Not" is from (me), which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

τοὺς πόδας] "His feet" is from pous (pous), which means a "foot", "a talon [of a bird]," and the concept of "to trample" or "to tred upon."

νίψασθαι, verb aor inf mid) "To wash" is from nipto, which means specifically "to wash hands or feet," and generally "to clean", "to purge," and "to wash off."

ἀλλ᾽ "But" is from alla (alla), which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

ἔστιν (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi (eimi), which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

καθαρὸς "Clean" is from katharos (katharos), which means "physically clean", "spotless", "clear", "pure (water)", "clear of objects", "free of contamination", "clear of debt", "genuine", "pure of birth", "without blemish," and "sound."

ὅλος: "Every whit" is from holos (holos), which means "the whole", "entire", "the universe," and "safe and sound."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὑμεῖς "You" is from hymeis, which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

καθαροί "Clean" is from katharos (katharos), which means "physically clean", "spotless", "clear", "pure (water)", "clear of objects", "free of contamination", "clear of debt", "genuine", "pure of birth", "without blemish," and "sound."

ἐστε, (2nd pl pres ind act) "Are" is from eimi (eimi), which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

ἀλλ᾽ "But" is from alla (alla), which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

οὐχὶ "Not" is from ouchi, an adverb which means "no", "no truly", "assuredly not", "not however", "nevertheless," "notwithstanding", "yet", "still", "never yet", "for not", "indeed", "for surely not", "no,—certainly not", "for I don't suppose," and "for in no manner."

πάντ "All" is from pas (pas), which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything."

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