John 18:36 My kingdom is not of this world:

KJV Verse: 

John 18:36 My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

The realm, the one relating to me, is not really beyond the world order, the familiar one. If beyond this order, the familiar one, was the realm, the one of mine, the aides, the ones of mine, might have contended for themselves, maybe, so that I might not want to be given over to the Jews. At this time, however, the realm, the one of mine, is not in the future. 

Hidden Meaning: 

There are a number of interesting things about this verse, starting with that fact that it says something quite different than the usual English translation. However, the most unusual things is that its repeated pattern, "the one of mine" or 
the one relating to me". Possessive forms are one of the most common structures in the sayings of Jesus and have several forms, but this is not one of them, but it is used here repeatedly. 

Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun but here follows the noun, "kingdom" and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). Here the form is plural so "those". See this article for more. 

"My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek. However, it refers to the article above, not the word "kingdom", which it follows.

The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. this is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

The key word is the Greek preposition translated as “of” which means "out of", "from", "by", "away from” when it refers to motion. It does not refer to motion here. When in refers to place, it means "beyond", and "outside of". It has other meanings as well, but they don’t apply here. In either case, it is not the possessive form, which would carry the sense of the English translation, "of this world". It is something else, either not from this world as a source or not beyond this world. 

Christ uses the word translated as "the world" to mean "the world order," specifically the powers-that-be. More about this word in this article about related words.

The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether than condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "beyond." this is the same structure as we say above. 

Christ uses the word translated as "the world" to mean "the world order," specifically the powers-that-be. More about this word in this article about related words.

When the verb "was" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. this is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

The odd structure, "the one of mine" again appears here. 

The Greek word translated as" servants" means "rower", "underling", "servant", "attendant", "subordinate," and "aides-de-camp." this is an uncommon word and it is not the word usually translated as "servant". The status is higher than "servants" of these people. 

The odd structure, "the one of mine" again appears here. 

The Greek verb translated as "fight" means to "content for a prize",  "fight", "content in court", and passively, "to be decided by contest". We say "compete" to capture this idea. It is in a form is a past tense form indicating an action done for or by the actor for or to himself or, in this case, themselves. 

A particle indicating something that might happen appears here. 

The word translated as "that" is not the simple demonstrative pronoun, but a word that means "there", "where," and "in order that."

The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used. this is different than the negatives appearing elsewhere. 

"I should be delivered" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is often translated in the KJV as "betray" but it has no real sense of that.

The "Jews" is the Greek word for Jewish people.

The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

"Now" is the adverb indicating the present time. Its use is important because it means the last word in the verse is in the context of time. 

The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. this is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

Again, we see the "the one of mine" structure here referring to the "realm". 

The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

"Hence" is a word that means "from that place" and "hence." Since the context is time, it means "in the future". 

 

 

 

Vocabulary: 

 

βασιλεία () "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign." 

 (article sg fem nom) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

ἐμὴ (adj sg fem nom) "My" is emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me." 

οὐκ (partic)"Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. 

ἔστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

ἐκ (prep)"From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τοῦ κόσμου (noun sg masc gen) "The world" is kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." It is a form of the is verb kosmeô, which means "to order", "to arrange", "to rule", "to adorn" (especially women), and "to equip." It especially means controlling and arranging an army.

τούτου: (adj sg masc gen) "This" is toutou, which is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar."

εἰ (conj)"If" is ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions.

ἐκ (prep)"From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τοῦ κόσμου (noun sg masc gen) "The world" is kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." It is a form of the is verb kosmeô, which means "to order", "to arrange", "to rule", "to adorn" (especially women), and "to equip." It especially means controlling and arranging an army. 

τούτου (adj sg masc gen) "This" is toutou, which is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar."

ἦν (verb 3rd sg imperf ind act) "Was" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom) "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

(article sg fem nom) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

ἐμή,  (adj sg fem nom) "My" is emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me." 

οἱ ὑπηρέται [uncommon](noun pl masc nom) "The servants" is hyperetes, which means "rower", "underling", "servant", "attendant", "subordinate," and "aides-de-camp."

οἱ (article pl masc nom) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

ἐμοὶ  (pron pl masc nom) "My" is emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me." 

ἠγωνίζοντο [uncommon](verb 3rd pl imperf ind mp) "Fight" is agonizomai , which means to "content for a prize",  "fight", "content in court", and passively, "to be decided by contest". 

ἄν (particle) "Then would" is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could.",

ἵνα (conj/adv) "That" is hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

μὴ (partic)"Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. 

παραδοθῶ (verb 1st sg aor subj pass) "I should be delivered" is paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow."

τοῖς Ἰουδαίοις: (adj pl masc dat) "The Jews" is from Ioudaioswhich means "Jew."

νῦν (adv)"Now" is nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is."

δὲ (conj/adv)"But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom)  "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

(article sg fem nom) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

ἐμὴ  (article sg fem nom) "My" is emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me."

οὐκ (partic)"Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. 

ἔστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

ἐντεῦθεν. (adv) "Hence" is enteuthen, which means "from that place" and "hence." "Henve", of course, means "in the future".

Nov 14 2017