Luke 10:9 And heal the sick that are therein, and say unto them,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 10:9 And heal the sick that are therein, and say unto them, The kingdom of God is come nigh unto you.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Eat such things as are set before you not only attend the ones in her, the weak, but also tell them it has come near, the realm of the Divine. 

Hidden Meaning: 

In the Greek, it is clear that Jesus is still talking in the context of the city that the apostles are visiting. It is suggested, but not certain, that the message, "it has neared, the realm of the divine" is meant specially for the weak and feeble.

The first part of this phrase in Greek appears in the KJV Luke 10:8, "eat such things as are set before you:". It is repeated here simply for convenience. 

The word translated as "eat" means "eat" but it also means "fret," as we say "something is eating me up". It is in the form of a command. 

The word translated as "such things" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or "the ones".  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The Greek verb translated as "as are set" means "place beside", freq. of meals, "set before", "serve up", and generally, "provide", "furnish". It is in the form of an adjective "serving up". 

"You" is the standard plural pronoun. It is in the form of an indirect object.

The discussion of the Greek for the KJV of this verse starts here. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

"Heal" is a Greek verb that means "to serve" and "to treat" in a medical sense. It doesn't mean "cure" in any sense. It is in the form of a command.

The word translated as "that are" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or "the ones", which is the sense here.  See this article for more. 

"Herein" comes from two Greek words that mean "in her". The "her" refers to the city in which the ones sent out were staying in. 

"The sick" is an adjective that means "without strength", "feeble", and "sickly." 

The second conjunction "and" appears here. It might work as a "but also". 

The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. 

The "them" here is the Greek word meaning "the same". It could refer to everyone in the city but more likely it refers to the weakly.

The word translated as "is come nigh" is the verb form of an adverb "near" in space, time, and relationships. In English, we would say "nears" or, in the form here, "has neared," doesn't quite work so perhaps "has gotten close" or, in the case of time, "is nearly here."

The word translated as "unto" means "against", "before", "during", "by" or "on."

The "you" here is plural as the object of the preposition "unto".

The phrase, "the kingdom of God" is what Luke prefers instead of the "the kingdom of heaven" phrase used more commonly in the other Gospels. The later phrase is discussed in more detail in this article.

The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

Wordplay: 

Vocabulary: 

The first part of this phrase in Greek appears in the KJV Luke 10:8, "eat such things as are set before you:". 

 ἐσθίετε (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Eat" is esthio, which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion. 

 τὰ  (article pl neut acc) "Such things" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. 

 παρατιθέμενα [uncommon](part pl pres mp neut nom ) "As are set before" is from paratithemi, which means "place beside", freq. of meals, "set before", "serve up", generally, "provide", "furnish", "place upon", "lay before one", "explain", "set before oneself", "have set before one",  "deposit what belongs to one in another's hands", "give in charge", "stake", "hazard", "cite in one's own favour", and "cite as evidence or authority".

ὑμῖν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

The Greek for the KJV English starts here. 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

 θεραπεύετε  (2nd pl pres imperat act) "Heal" is from therapeuo, which means "to provide service", "to be an attendant", "pay court to", "pay attention", "to consult", "attend to (things)", "take care of", "observe (a day)", "train (of animals)", "cultivate (of land)", "prepare (food or drugs)," and "mend (garments)."

τοὺς (article pl masc acc) "That are" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

αὐτῇ (adj sg fem dat) "There"  is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἀσθενεῖς,  [uncommon](adj pl masc acc) "Weak" is from asthenes, which means "without strength," "weak", in body "feeble", "sickly", in power, "weak", "feeble", in property, "weak", "poor", and "insignificant." It could be the verb (meaning "to be weak" or "to be sickly") used in the earlier verse, but it would be in the second person, singular, "You are/were weak/sickly." So it doesn't fit.

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

λέγετε (2nd pl pres imperat act) "Say" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

αὐτοῖς (adj pl masc dat) "To them"  is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

Ἤγγικεν (3rd perf act sg ind) "Is come nigh" is eggizo, which means "to bring near", "to join one things to another," to draw near," and "to approach." This word does not appear in the Perseus dictionary. It comes from an adverb ἐγγύς, keggus, which means 1) (of place) "near", "nigh", "at hand," 2) (of time) "nigh at hand" 3) (of numbers) "nearly", "almost", "coming near," and 4) (of relationship) "akin to." 

ἐφ᾽ (prep) "Unto" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against." -

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom) "The kingdom" is from basileia which means "kingdom", "dominion,""reign", "queen", "princess", "palace", "hereditary rule", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

τοῦ θεοῦ. (noun sg masc gen) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity." --

Related Verses: 

Jan 10 2018