Luke 11:52 Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge:

KJV Verse: 

Luke 11:52 Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Sadly for you, the lawyers because you have lifted the catch of investigation, yourselves not enter in and the one who are entering themselves in hindering.

Hidden Meaning: 

I like the term "the key to knowledge" but Jesus lived in t a time before keys and lock as such existed so it is some poetic just translating it that way. The Greek word translated as "knowledge" is also somewhat of a stretch, but it came to mean "exoteric knowledge" later in history. Jesus only uses this word in this one verse. 

"Woe" is from an exclamation of grief, meaning "woe" or "alas." Today we would say "sadly [for you]" or "boo-hoo to you." More about this phrase in this article on Christ's humor, under the subtitle, "exaggeration."

The Greek pronoun "unto you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

The Greek word translated as "lawyers" means "relating to laws", "relating to points of law", "forensic", "conventional", "lawyer", "notary", and "legal advisor". 

The word translated as "for" introduces a statement of fact or cause. It is not the word normally translated as "for" int the Gospel, but a word normally translated as "that."

"Ye have taken away " is one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," and "to cause to cease." However, it also has a humorous feel. As we would say "someone lifted my wallet".

"The keys" is a noun that describes "that which serves for closing," meaning the devices that holds a door closed. It means " a bar", "a bolt", "a catch," and "a hook." Later, it came to mean "key" but in the sense of something that holds something shut rather than opens something.

The Greek word translated as "knowledge" means "seeking to know", "inquiry", "investigation", "result of investigation", "decision", "higher, esoteric knowledge", "acquaintance with" a person, "recognizing", "means of knowing", "being known", " means of knowing": hence, "statement in writing". 

"Ye...entered in" is a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind." Though this is translated in the KJV as acting on themselves, the verb is not the form that indicates they are acting, or in this case, not acting on themselves. 

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

The word translated as "yourselves is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances. This word is in the form of the subject of the sentence, not the object, "yourselves have not ended in". 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

"Them that were entering in" is the verb above that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind." It is in the form of an adjective preceded by an article, "the ones having entered themselves in". It is in the form of a verb acting on itself, which was not the cast with the earlier use. 

"Ye hindered" is from a verb that means "to hinder" and "to prevent." It is an uncommon verb. 

Vocabulary: 

οὐαὶ (exclam) "Woe" is from ouai, which is an exclamation of pain or anger meaning "woe" or "alas." 

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given. --

τοῖς νομικοῖς, [uncommon] (adj pl masc dat) "Lawyers" is nomikos, which means "relating to laws", "relating to points of law", "forensic", "conventional", "lawyer", "notary", and "legal advisor". 

ὅτι (adv/conj) "For" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." --

ἤρατε (verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Ye have taken away" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for." 

τὴν κλεῖδα (noun sg fem acc) "The key" is from kleis, which means generally "that which serves for closing." It means " a bar", "a bolt", "a catch", "the tongue of a hasp," and "a hook." Later, it came to mean "key" but more in the sense of a thing that locks rather than a thing that opens.

τῆς γνώσεως: [unique](noun sg fem gen) "Knowledge" is gnosis, which means "seeking to know", "inquiry", "investigation", "result of investigation", "decision", "higher, esoteric knowledge", "acquaintance with" a person, "recognizing", "means of knowing", "being known", " means of knowing": hence, "statement in writing:. 

 αὐτοὶ (adj pl masc nom) "Yourselves" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. --

εἰσήλθατε  (verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Enter in" is from eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

τοὺς εἰσερχομένους (part pl pres mp masc acc) "Them that were entering in" is from eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

ἐκωλύσατε. (verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Forbid" is from kolyo, which means "to hinder", "withhold," and "to prevent."

Related Verses: 

Mar 19 2018