Luke 11:46 Woe unto you also, ye lawyers! for ye lade men with burdens

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And to you, the lawyers, sadly, because you load people's intolerable burdens and yourselves with one of those fingers of yours don't touch near the burden. 

KJV : 

Luke 11:46 Woe unto you also, ye lawyers! for ye lade men with burdens grievous to be borne, and ye yourselves touch not the burdens with one of your fingers.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

A very interesting verse with lots of words Jesus uses no where else and some unusual word forms as well. 

The Greek word translated as "and" begins this phrase though it doesn't appear in the KJV. It is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." 

"Woe" is from an exclamation of grief, meaning "woe" or "alas." Today we would say "sadly [for you]" or "boo-hoo to you." More about this phrase in this article on Christ's humor, under the subtitle, "exaggeration." This appears later in the verse in the Greek. 

The Greek pronoun "unto you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

The Greek word translated as "lawyers" means "relating to laws", "relating to points of law", "forensic", "conventional", "lawyer", "notary", and "legal advisor". 

The word translated as "for" introduces a statement of fact or cause. "Because" is the word we use in English.

"Ye lade" is a verb that means "to load", and "to encumber".  It is an uncommon verb used only here and in Matthew 11:28.

The Greek word for "men" also means "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, as it is here, it means "people" and "peoples". It is not the object of the verb, but the possessive form, "men's". 

There is no "with" here. 

"Burdens" is another uncommon noun that means "load", "burden", "freight" and "a child in the womb." In plural, it means "merchandise" and "wares."

"Grievous to be born" is an adjective that means "intolerable". It is used by Jesus uniquely here. The English phrase appears also in Matthew 23:4, but the Greek word does not appear in that verse in the Greek sources we use today. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "you yourselves" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same." It the Greek, it clearly refers to the burdens, not the people he is addressing. 

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

The Greek verb translated as "touch" means  "touch", and "touch upon", 

"Burden" is a Greek word which means "a load," and "burden." In the plural, it tends to refer to "merchandise". It is the noun form of the verb above. It is not the object of the sentence an indirect object, which here, describes an "area of affect" so the sense is "near the burden". 

The Greek word translated as "one thing" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person. The form is that of something used as an instrument. 

The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

"Of...finger" is from another uncommon (for Christ) Gree word that means "fingers", "toes", "the thumb" "an inch," and "a digit." It is used in the same sense that we might say, "keeping someone under your thumb." Since the term also means "toes", under someone's foot also works best. The form is possessive. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "Unto you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." 

τοῖς νομικοῖς [uncommon] (adj pl masc dat) "Lawyers" is nomikos, which means "relating to laws", "relating to points of law", "forensic", "conventional", "lawyer", "notary", and "legal advisor". 

οὐαί,  (exclam) "Woe" is from ouai, which is an exclamation of pain or anger meaning "woe" or "alas." --

 ὅτι (adv/conj) "For" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." --

φορτίζετε [unocmmon](verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Ye lade" is from phortizô, which means "to load", "to encumber," and, in the passive, "to be laden."

τοὺς ἀνθρώπους (noun sg fem gen) "Men" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. --

φορτία [uncommon](noun pl neut nom/acc) "Burdens" is from phortion, which means "load", "burden", "freight" and "a child in the womb." In plural, it means "merchandise" and "wares."

δυσβάστακτα, [unique](adj pl neut acc) "Grievous to be born" is dysbastaktos which means "intolerable", "grievous to be borne".

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

αὐτοὶ (adj pl masc nom/voc) "Ye yourselves" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

ἑνὶ (noun sg masc/neut dat ) "One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." 

τῶν δακτύλων [uncommon] (noun pl masc gen)  "Fingers" is from daktylos, which means "finger", "thumb", "toes," a measure of length, "finger's breadth," "date," and "a kind of grape."

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

προσψαύετε [unique](verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Touch" is prospsauo, which means "touch", and "touch upon", 

τοῖς φορτίοις.(noun pl neut dat) "The burden" is from phortion, which means "to load", "to burden", "to freight;" in agriculture, "produce", "crops," and "a child in the womb." In plural, it means "merchandise" and "wares."

Front Page Date: 

Mar 13 2018