Luke 13:2 Suppose ye that these Galilaeans were sinners above all the Galilaeans,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 13:2 Suppose ye that these Galilaeans were sinners above all the Galilaeans, because they suffered such things?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Do you imagine that the Galileans, the erring like all the Galileans they came from, that these things have happened to them?

Hidden Meaning: 

The Greek is more straightforward than the KJV translation. Jesus seems to say that these Galileans made mistakes like all Galileans do. This verse and the related on in Luke 13:4 seem to equate the word translated as "sinner", wich means "the erring" with "debtor". These ideas are not clearly connected to moral failings. 

The word translated as "suppose ye" doesn't mean think as much as it means "expect" or "imagine." Jesus returns to using the plural you, addressing the crowd, after addressing a single person in the previous couple of verses (Luke 12:59, Luke 12:58). 

The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

"Galilaeans" is the noun referring to people in the region of Galilee. It is introduced by an article, "the", which in Greek is closer to "this" or "these". 

"These" is translated from a Greek word that means "this", "that", "the nearer." 

"Sinners" is a word that means "erroneous" or "erring." It also means "of bad character" but with the sense of being a slave or low-born not evil. Only in biblical translations is this term given the sense of wickedness. More about the translation issues regarding the translation of "sin" here.  In this context, this word doesn't mean that there was any "sin" committed by anyone, only that the people made a mistake and died for it. 

The word translated as "were" means "to become," and "turn into", that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "to be" which is existence in the current state. The sense is "came into being".  This verb doesn't equate things. It has a number of special uses with different prepositions.

The Greek preposition translated "above," primarily means "besides", "with", "along", "like", and "beyond." It also has a number of specialized meanings. It does not mean "worse than", which is the sense of the translation. On the contrary, the sense seems to be "like" or "along with". This is the word from which we get the English "parallel".  With the verb above, it means "be born from" or "compared with". 

The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas.

"Galilaeans" is the noun referring to people in the region of Galilee. 

The word translated as "because" introduces a statement of fact or cause.  This is the same word translated as "that" earlier in the verse. 

"They suffer" is from a verb which means "to have done to one", "to be treated so," and "to come to be in a state." It is usually translated as "suffer" in the NT, but it does not refer specifically to suffering. 

The "such things" is an adjective that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage.  It is different than the word translated as "these" above, but they are related. 

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary: 

Δοκεῖτε (verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Suppose ye" is dokeo, which means "expect", "suppse", "imagine", "have an opinion", "seem", "seem good," and "to be reputed." --

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." 

οἱ Γαλιλαῖοι [unique](noun pl masc nom) "Galilaeans" is Galilaios, which is the noun referring to people in the region of Galilee. 

 οὗτοι (adj pl masc nom) "These" is houtos, which as an adjective means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why."

ἁμαρτωλοὶ (adj pl masc nom) "Sinners" is hamartolos, which means "erroneous" or "erring." It also means "of bad character" but with the sense of being a slave or low-born not evil.

παρὰ (prep) "Above" is para, which means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond", "parallel (geometry)", "like (metaphor)", "a parody of (metaphor)", "precisely at the moment of (time)," and "throughout (time)."

πάντας (adj pl masc acc) "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." 

τοὺς Γαλιλαίους [unique](noun pl masc acc) "Galilaeans" is Galilaios, which is the noun referring to people in the region of Galilee. 

ἐγένοντο, (verb 3rd pl aor ind mid) "Were" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.  With the preposition used here, para, it can means "born from" or "compare with". 

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

ταῦτα (adj pl neut nom/acc) "Such things" is tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why."

πεπόνθασιν;  (verb 3rd pl perf ind act) "They suffered" is from paschô, which means "to have happen to one," "to have done to one", "to be treated so," and "to come to be in a state." -- 

Related Verses: 

May 15 2018