Luke 15:12​ And the younger of them said to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods

KJV Verse: 

Luke 15:12 And the younger of them said to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods that falleth to me. And he divided unto them his living.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And he said, the younger of the them, to the father, "Father, hand over to me that which is coming, a share of the property." That, as a cause, he allocated to them the livelihood."

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse contains a clue to the most mysterious of Christ's words, (see Matthew 6:11) a word he invented in the Lord's Prayer, which isn't even translated in the version we pray in English. In this verse, we may see both components that make up that word, but you cannot see them in English.  There aer two words used uniquely in this verse, one is related to the mystery word. Many words are added in the English translation of this verse that are unnecessary. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"The younger" is the comparative form of the adjective that means "young", "youthful", "suited to a youth", "new", "fresh,". 

The word translated as "of them" is the Greek adjective commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. 

"Said" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also. 

There is no "his" in the Greek.

"Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor. When referring to others. The form is an indirect object with an article, so "to the father".

"Father" is the same word as above but in the form of address.

The verb translated as "give" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." the form is a command. 

The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun.

"Portion" is a noun that  means "share", "portion", "lot", "destiny", "heritage", "one's turn," the part one takes,""proportion," and "part" (as an opposite of whole).

The Greek word translated as "goods" is uniquely used here and it could be a part of the "mystery word" in the Lord's Prayer. This noun means "that which is one's own", "one's substance", "property", "substance", "essence", "true nature", "substantiality", and in Magic, "a material thing by which a connection is established between the person to be acted upon and the supernatural agent", Its root is a form of the verb "to exist". Perhaps a half dozen other Greek words are also translated to "goods" in English, but this parable is the only time this word is used. 

The word translated as "that falleth" means literally to "throw against, before, by or on," but it has a large variety of specific uses.  Here it may mean "contribute", "let loose",  "belong to", or "fall to the share of". The prefix it uses in the same as the one in the mystery word. 

There is no "to me" here in the Greek.

There is no "and" here either. However, there is the conjunction usually translated as "but". Here, however, it acts more like a "so", explaining a cause."

There is an untranslated word here a demonstrative pronoun that means "this" or "that". It acts here as a connective pronoun, with the word above like "so that" in English. 

Another unique word is translated as "divided". It means to "take apart", "cleave in twain", "divide", "dispense", "distinguish , "determine", "decide", and "allocate". 

The word translated as "unto them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The form is that of an indirect object. Interestingly, the implication here is that both sons received their shares of the property.

There is no "his" in the Greek. 

The Greek word translated as "living" means "livelihood", and "means of living", in the sense of supporting yourself and your family. It is not the Greek word normally translated as "life". See this article about that word and related terms. 

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

εἶπεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Said" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." --

νεώτερος (adj sg masc nom comp) "The younger" is neos, which means "young", "youthful", "suited to a youth", "new", "fresh,". and as an adverb of time, "lately", "just now", "anew," and "afresh," -- 

αὐτῶν (adj pl masc gen) "Of them"  is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." -- 

τῷ πατρί (noun sg masc dat) "The father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." 

Πάτερ, (noun sg masc voc ) "To...father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor. When referring to others, Christ uses it to refer to their ancestors, that is, "forefathers."

δός (verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Give" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." --

μοι (pron 1st sing dat) "Me" is moi, which means "I", "me", and "my". --

τὸ (article sg neut acc) "That" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἐπιβάλλον (part sg pres act neut acc) "Falleth" is epiballo, which means to "throw or cast upon", "lay on", " affix (a seal, add),"" contribute", "place next in order", "let grow", "let loose", "throw oneself upon", "go straight towards", "follow", "come next", "belong to", "fall to the share of", "shut to", "close", "to overlap (in logic)," and in the passive to "lie upon", "be put upon," and "be set over."

μέρος (noun sg neut acc) "Portion" is meros, which means "share", "portion", "lot", "destiny", "heritage", "one's turn," the part one takes,""proportion," and "part" (as an opposite of whole).

τῆς οὐσίας: [uncommon](noun sg fem gen) "Of goods" is ousiawhich means "that which is one's own", "one's substance", "property", "substance", "essence", "true nature", "substantiality", and in Magic, "a material thing by which a connection is established between the person to be acted upon and the supernatural agent",

(article sg masc nom) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

διεῖλεν [unique](verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Divided" is diaireowhich means to "take apart", "cleave in twain", "divide", "dispense", "distinguish , "determine", "decide", and "allocate". 

αὐτοῖς (adj pl masc dat)  "Unto them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." -- 

τὸν βίον.  [uncommon](noun sg masc acc) "Living" is from bios (bios), which means "mode of life", "livelihood", "means of living", "the world we live in", "a biography," and "caste." --

Related Verses: 

Jul 17 2018