Luke 15:15 And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country;

KJV Verse: 

Luke 15:15 And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country; and he sent him into his fields to feed swine.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And being made to leave, he was put together with one of the citizens of the domain in that place. And he sent him into those fields of his to tend his pigs. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The Greek makes it fairly clear that the son of the story didn't go to work by his own choice, but that he was forced into the service of another because he could not support himself. This verse in the KJV combines this verse of the Greek with the first part of the next Greek verse. A number of uncommon words for Jesus are used, one for the first time. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The Greek verb translated as "he went" means "to make to go", "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over."  It is in the passive, so the man "made to go" or leave.  It is an adjective, "being made to leave". 

There is no "and". It is added because the form of the previous verb was changed from an adjective to an active verb.

"Joined himself" is from a Greek verb that means to "glue", "cement", "mend", "join", "fasten together", and "put together".  Though the KJV makes it sound like he joined himself to the citizen, the Greek is clear that it was done to him, that he didn't do it himself.

The Greek word translated as "a" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person. The actual Greek phrase is "to one of the citizens". The "to" comes from the form of one as an indicated object. 

"Citizens is from a Greek noun that means "citizen" and "freeman". It is plural, not singular as part of the phrase "one of the citizens". This is the first time it is used by Jesus in the Gospels. The Greek word is the source of our word for "politics". 

The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as in a specific place from a word that means "there."

The word translated as "country" is the word that was translated as "land" in the previous verse  Luke 15:14. and the verse before, Luke 15:13, as "country".  It is common in the Gospels but used by Jesus primarily in this story. The word means "a special place", "a spot" and "a landed estate". It means "land" more in the sense of an estate, that is, granted land.

The following sentence from the next verse in the Greek. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"He sent" is from a Greek verb that means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort."

 The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

"Fields" is from the common noun that means "field", "lands," or "countryside."

The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

"To feed" is from a Greek verb that means to "feed" or "tend". In the Gospels it is applied only to tending animals. This is the first time it is used by Jesus in the Gospels. 

The Greek word translated as "swine" primarily means "sow." Of course, the pigs were an unclean animal among the Jews and tending them as bad a profession as a Jew can get. This word is uncommon for Jesus to use in the Gospels. 

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

πορευθεὶς (art sg aor pass masc nom) "Depart" is poreuomai (poreuô) which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT. -- The Greek verb translated as "go" isn't the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT but it is often translated that way. This word means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." This word, however, uniquely means both "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life." Since it is in a form that acts on itself, the sense is "take yourselves".  

ἐκολλήθη [uncommon](verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "Joined himself" is from kollao, which means to "glue", "cement", "mend", "join", "fasten together", and "put together". 

ἑνὶ (noun sg masc dat ) "a" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen.  

τῶν πολιτῶν [uncommon](noun pl masc gen) "Citizens" is polites, which means "citizen" and "freeman".

τῆς χώρας [uncommon](noun sg fem gen) "Land" is from chora, which means "space", "the spot in a room where a thing is", "place", "spot", "the position", "the proper place for a thing or person", "land," and "landed estate." It is a metaphor for "station", "place" or "position," in society.  --

ἐκείνης, (adj sg fem gen) "That" is ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner." 

From next verse of Greek:

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἔπεμψεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "He sent" is pempo, which means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort."

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." 

τοὺς ἀγροὺς (noun pl masc acc) "Fields" is agros, which means "field", "lands," or "country."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

βόσκειν [uncommon](verb pres inf act ) "Feed" is bosko, which means to "feed", "tend", generally, "feed", "nourish", of cattle, "feed", and "graze".

 χοίρους: [uncommon](noun pl masc/fem acc) "Swine" is from choiroswhich means "sow", "young pig", "porker", "swine," and slang for the female sex organ.

Related Verses: 

Jul 20 2018