Luke 16:6 And he said, An hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 16:6 And he said, An hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take thy bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

That one, however, said, "A hundred casks of oil." The one, however, said to him, "Get your letter and you sit down. Quickly write fifty. 

Hidden Meaning: 

This is a short simple verse, but it contains a unique word and an uncommon word used here for the first time.  This is the part of the story where the house manager fulfills the slander told about him. He was at first wrongly accused of mismanagement, but after being accused becomes guilty of it. 

The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The word translated as "he" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

"Said" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

"An hundred" is from the Greek number "a hundred."

"Measures" is a Hebrew measure of liquid of between eight and nine gallons. It is also a Greek word  batos, which means "bramble." Greek words spelled the same also mean "blackberry" and "fish". 

"Of oil" is a noun that means "olive oil", "anointing oil," and "any oily substance."

The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The word translated as "goods" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

"Said" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

"Take" is a word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. Since it means both "take" and "accept", it works like our word "get".  It is a command. 

The word translated as "thy" is possessive form of the second person pronoun.

"Bill" is the Greek noun that means "letter" and like our "letter" it can also mean a written document, a letter.  This is an uncommon word for Jesus and its first use is here. Its only other uses in the next verse. Interestingly, it works like our letter in that it also means learning (a man of letters) and the law (the letter of the law). 

Finally, an "and" that is really an "and" in the Greek. The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). 

"Sit down" is a Greek verb  "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to post", "to take seats", "to convene", "to appoint",  and "to establish".  This is not a command, but a statement. 

"Write" is the Greek verb that  means "to mark", "to express by written characters", "to write a letter", "to write down [a law]", and so on. It has the same root as the "letter" above. It is a common. 

 The word translated as "fifty" means "fifty".  It is an uncommon word, only used by Jesus in one other Luke parable. 

Wordplay: 

Vocabulary: 

(article sg masc nom) "He" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. --

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -

εἶπεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Said" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." --

Ἑκατὸν [uncommon] (numeral ) "An hundred" is from hekaton, which is the number "a hundred." -- 

βάτους [unique](noun pl fem acc) "Measures" is from batos, which is a Hebrew measure of liquid of between eight and nine gallons. It is also a Greek word  batos, which means "bramble." Greek words spelled the same also mean "blackberry" and "fish". 

ἐλαίου: (noun sg neut gen) "Of oil" is from elaion, which means "olive oil", "anointing oil," and "any oily substance." 

(article sg masc nom) "He" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. --

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

εἶπεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Said" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." 

αὐτῷ (adj sg masc dat) "Unto him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

Δέξαι (verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Take" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things. 

σου (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your."  --

τὰ γράμματα [first, uncommon](noun pl neut acc) "Bill" is gramma, which means "that which is drawn", "written character", "letter", "articulate sound", "inscription", "set of written characters", "piece of writing", "papers", "documents", " learning", "laws or rules".

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

καθίσας (verb 2nd sg aor ind act) "Sit down" is kathizô, which means "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to post", "to take seats", "to convene", "to appoint", "to establish", "to put in a certain condition", "to reside", "to sink down", "to run aground [for ships]," "to recline at meals," and "to settle." From the Greek kata("down") hedraios ("to settle") . -- 

ταχέως [uncommon](adv) "Quickly" is tacheos which means "quickly", or "speedily". -- 

γράψον (verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Write" is grapho which means "to mark", "to express by written characters", "to write a letter", "to write down [a law]", "to proscribe", "to ordain", "to write for oneself", "to enroll oneself", "to draw signs", "to describe a figure" "to brand," and "to indict."

πεντήκοντα. [uncommon] (numeral) "Fifty" is from pentekonta, which means "fifty". --

Related Verses: 

Aug 11 2018