Luke 21:30 When they now shoot forth, ye see and know of your own selves

KJV Verse: 

Luke 21:30 When they now shoot forth, ye see and know of your own selves that summer is now nigh at hand.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

When they might toss forth by this time, seeing from them, you know that by this time nearly the harvest it is.

Explanation of Greek: 

This resembles Matthew 24:32 and Mark 13:28 because is uses uncommon word seldom by Jesus, the resemblance in translation is greater than it is in Greek. The "for your own selves" here is almost certainly wrong. There is also a hidden play on words in a word that Jesus only uses here.

The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

"They...shoot forth" is a Greek verb that Jesus only uses here. It means to means "throw or lay before", "send forth", "emit", " and several other things. It is a form of the common word Jesus used that is translated as "caste out" but which is closer to our "toss".  It is also a play on the Greek word for "parable", which Jesus uses in the other versions of this verse (Matthew 24:32 and Mark 13:28) but which this Gospel uses as an introduction, not part of Jesus's words.

"Now" is a Greek adverb meaning "by this time", "forthwith", "after", "immediately," and "now." It means proximity in time, but also place.

The verb translated as "ye see" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." The form is not an active verb, but an adjective "seeing".

There is no "and" here. It is added because the KJV translators translated the previous verb as active, when it is not.

"Know" is a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn.

The word translated as "of" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.  This phrase follows "see", not "know".

"your own selves " is from the reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It doesn't have "person" like a verb, just gender and number so it could be any plural form pronoun, but since Greek has a special verb for that means "for yourselves" or "by yourselves", "yourselves" is unlikely. Here, the likely meaning "these things themselves", referring to the "tossing out" of the previous clause.

The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

The word for "summer" primarily means "harvest" in Greek. We might think that the new leaves on the fig tree means "spring", but since the reference is to the propagation of a fig tree, it would start growing at harvest time. A little about the propagation of figs: typically, cutting are taken before the winter and propagated through the winter and planted in the spring. Figs are not a solid wood tree, but a hollow wood, growing fruit only from new growth from the previous year.

The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. However, this verb does not exist in the Matthew and Mark version of this verse so it is added by the translators,

"Now" is a Greek adverb meaning "by this time", "forthwith", "after", "immediately," and "now." It means proximity in time, but also place.

The adverb translated as "nigh at hand" means near in time or distance.

Wordplay: 

The Greek word translated as "shoot out" is a play on the Greek word for "parabole".

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὅταν (adv/conj) "When" is from hotan, which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)."

προβάλωσιν [unique](verb 3rd pl aor subj act) "They...shoot forth" is proballo, which means "throw or lay before", "throw to",  "put forward", "expose", "give up", "send forth", "emit", " throw beyond", "beat in throwing", and "produce".

ἤδη, (adv) "Now" is ede, which means "already", "by this time", "forthwith", "after", "immediately," and "now." It means proximity in time, but also place.

βλέποντες ( part pl pres act masc nom ) "Ye see" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for."

ἀφ᾽ (prep) "Of" is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. --

ἑαυτῶν ( adj pl masc gen ) "Your own selves" is heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos.

γινώσκετε ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act ) "Know," is ginosko which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive."

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

ἤδη (adv) "Now" is ede, which means "already", "by this time", "forthwith", "after", "immediately," and "now." It means proximity in time, but also place. -- "Now" is a Greek adverb meaning "by this time", "forthwith", "after", "immediately," and "now." It means proximity in time, but also place.

ἐγγὺς [uncommon](adv) "Nigh at hand" is from eggys, which means "near", "nigh", "at hand," nearly", "coming near," and "akin."

τὸ θέρος [uncommon] (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Summer" is from theros, which means "summer", "summer fruits", "harvest," and "crop."

ἐστίν: ( verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") --

Related Verses: 

Jan 18 2019