Luke 22:35 When I sent you without purse, and scrip, and shoes, lacked ye any thing?

KJV Verse: 

Luke 22:35 When I sent you without purse, and scrip, and shoes, lacked ye any thing?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

At the time when I sent you away without a bag and a food pouch and sandals, none of that, did you fail to obtain?

Hidden Meaning: 

This is an interesting verse because it refers to one of Jesus's earlier verses, Luke 10:4. It also uses the same uncommon words in the that verse plus another uncommon word. It also has a unique word for a common idea that Jesus seldom uses. The end of the verse works differently in Greek than in the KJV translation since a negative is not translated,

"When" is an conjunction/adverb that means "when", "as when", "at the time when," and "sometimes."

The "I sent" here is a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle."

The "you" here is plural, indicating it was addressed to a group of Christ's listeners as the object. 

"Without" is a proposition which means " without" and "apart from." It is used uniquely by Jesus. He uses a different word that is translated as "without" in two other verses, but the concept of being "without" was one that he seldom used. This is interesting.

The Greek word translated as "purse" here means "bag", "pouch", and "purse." This word is only used in Luke 10:4.  It doesn't mean a money purse specifically, but any kind of bag. Though Matthew 10:9 has the word "purse" in English translation, the Greek word in that verb means "belt", which is where money was put during the era.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In English, we would probably used the word "nor" with the negative "without", the Greeks uses the positive conjunction here.

"Scrip" is translated from a Greek word specifically meaning a leather pouch to carry food or provisions for traveling. We might call this a knapsack or provisions bag.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"Shoes" is the Greek word for sandals that a person ties on.

Here, an untranslated negative appears. It is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do or think something. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used. However, it does not negate the verb. Here, it comes before the word translated as "anything", which creates the sense "none of this", a phrase the reiterates the idea of not having anything. The "anything" is not the object of the verb, as translated, but a part of this negative phrase.

The verb translated as "lacked ye " means "to be or to fall behind",  "to fail," and "to be wanting." It is also an uncommon word. But it specifically means "to fail to obtain", which seems to fit here the best.

The Greek word translated as "anything" in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything."  Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". Here, it is not the object of the verb as translated, but it modifies a negative that is not translated. The form is "of anything" or "of that". It comes after the untranslated negative.

Vocabulary: 

Ὅτε (adv/conj) "When" is hote, which means "when", "as when", "at the time when," and "sometimes."

ἀπέστειλα ( verb 1st sg aor ind act ) "I sent" is apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch."

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

ἄτερ [unique](prep) "Without" is ater, which means " without" and "apart from."

βαλλαντίου [uncommon](noun sg neut gen) "Purse" is from ballantion, which means "bag", "pouch", and "purse."

καὶ  (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

πήρας, (noun sg fem gen) "Scrip" is from pera, which means a "leather pouch to carry food", "a bag for traveling," or "a wallet."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὑποδημάτων, (noun pl neut gen) "Shoes" is from hypodemawhich means "sole bound under the foot with straps", "sandal", "shoe", and "half-boot". 

μή (partic)  Untranslated is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

τινος  ( pron sg gen) "What" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what." --

ὑστερήσατε; [uncommon]( verb 2nd pl aor ind act ) "To be in want" is from hystereo, which means to "be behind", "to come later", "to come too late for", "to lag behind", "to fall below", "to fail to obtain", "to lack", "to fail," and "to be wanting." --

Related Verses: 

Luke 10:4 Carry neither purse, nor scrip, nor shoes:

Matthew 10:10 Nor bag for [your] journey,

Luke 22:35 When I sent you without purse, and scrip, and shoes,

Feb 15 2019