Matthew 12:27 And if I by Beelzebub cast out devils,...

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Pharisees attack, casting out demons

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And if I myself in Beelzebub toss out demons, those sons of yours? In what do they toss them out? Through this, they themselves judges will be of you.

KJV : 

Matthew 12:27 And if I by Beelzebub cast out devils, by whom do your children cast [them] out? therefore they shall be your judges.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Though it is not clear from the verse, the "sons" that Jesus refers to may be his students, who were also casting out demons when this question was asked. This raises the question about whether or not some of Jesus's were children of these particular Pharisees. It could also be a prophesy that their sons would someday toss out demons by the power of the Divine.

The "are your judges" at the end read more like  "judges will be of you."

NIV : 

Matthew 12:27  And if I drive out demons by Beelzebul, by whom do your people drive them out? So then, they will be your judges.

Wordplay: 

There term "Beelzebub" is a play on the term "Master" or "Lord." 

My Takeaway: 

We can know the power of the Divine from our successful battles against  templting but worthless ideas.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (and) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εἰ (partic) "If" is from ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions.

ἐγὼ (pron 1st sg nom) "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself. --

ἐν (prep) "By" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

Βεεζεβοὺλ [4 verses](noun masc sg) "Beelzebub" is from the Greek Beelzeboul, which has no Greek meaning because it is from the Hebrew ba‘al zbûb, which means "Lord [of the] Flies" which is a mockery of the Hebrew ba‘al zbûl, "Lord Prince." Ba'al, of course, was one of the pagan gods mentioned often in the Old Testament, but the word means simple "Lord".

ἐκβάλλω (1st sg pres ind act) "Cast out" is from ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place", "throw ashore", "drive out of", "banish", "expel", "publish", "strike out of", "let fall", "drop", "throw away", "cast aside", "reject, ""expose, ""go out", "depart", "divorce (a spouse)", "depose (a king)", "fell (trees)", "throw decisively (in wrestling)", "dig wells", "get rid of," in the passive, "to be ejected." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter."

τὰ (article pl masc acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

δαιμόνια, (noun pl masc acc) "Devils" is from daimonion, which means "divinity", "divine power", "a lower divine being," and "evil spirit."

οἱ (article pl masc non)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

υἱοὶ (noun pl masc non) "Children" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child."

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen)  "Your" is from humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐν (prep) "By" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". 

τίνι (pron sg dat) "Whom" is from tis, which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

ἐκβάλλουσιν; (3rd pl pres ind act) "Cast them out" is from ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place", "throw ashore", "drive out of", "banish", "expel", "publish", "strike out of", "let fall", "drop", "throw away", "cast aside", "reject, ""expose, ""go out", "depart", "divorce (a spouse)", "depose (a king)", "fell (trees)", "throw decisively (in wrestling)", "dig wells", "get rid of," in the passive, "to be ejected." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter."

διὰ (prep) Untranslated is dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between."

τοῦτο adj sg neut nom/acc) "Therefore" is from touto, which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]."

αὐτοὶ (adj masc pl nom) "They" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

κριταὶ (noun masc pl nom) "Judges" is from krites, which means "judge", "umpire," and "interpreter." 

ἔσονται (3rd pl fut ind mid) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai.)

ὑμῶν. (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is from humon  the plural form pronoun of the second person, "you."

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

if -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

- (MW) The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I" and we say "I myself" in English. 

by  - The word translated as "by" primarily means "in", "with," and "into." It means "by" in the sense of "near." It means "in" in the sense of "in the name of" or "by the power of". 

Beelzebub  - Jesus refers to the personalization of evil with the term "Beelzebub"It is not based upon any Greek word. The word "Ba'al Zebub" ("Lord of the Flies" or "Lord of the Flyers") is a Hebrew pun on "Ba'al Zebul" meaning "Lord of the Manor". Christ refers to this pun in Matthew 10:25 using the Greek word "master of the estate" to introduce it. However, in Matthew 12:27, Christ uses this term to refer to the refer to the controller of demons. For more information, see this article.

cast - "Cast " is a Greek verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

out  -- This is from the prefix that means "out of" or "from"of the previous verb.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

devils,  - "Devils" is a Greek word that means "divinity", "divine power", "a lower divine being," and "evil spirit. "Evil spirit" is a New Testament usage or interpretation. More about Biblical use in this article.) Today, we would use a psychological term for these disorders, like "delusions", or, "personal demons". 

by   - The word translated as "by" primarily means "in", "with," and "into." It means "by" in the sense of "near." It means "in" in the sense of "in the name of" or "by the power of". 

whom  -- The word translated as "whom" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

do -- This helping verb is used to create questions, commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

your -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

children -- The word translated as "children" more generally means "child" or "children". It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Jesus also used it metaphorically to describe those who follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

cast - "Cast " is a Greek verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

them-- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences. Since "devils" was the object of the previous occurence of this verb, it can be assumed that it is the object here.

out  -- This is from the prefix that means "out of" or "from"of the previous verb.

therefore  - (WW) The word "therefore" is from two Greek words meaning "through this" or "by this." It can refer either to a period of time or a cause for something.

they  - (MW) The pronoun "they" is used as the subject to add emphasis to the word, since it is already contain in the verb. It is like we would say "they themselves" in English. 

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

your  - - The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours." Uncommonly, this word is separated by the verb from the word "judges." So the sense may be more "of you."

judges. - -  The word "judges" means "judge" or "interpreter" and it is the noun form of the word meaning "to decide" or "to separate."

KJV Translation Issues: 

5
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "devils" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "children" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "therefore" should be "through/by this."
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "they themselves"

NIV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

if -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

- (MW) The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I" and we say "I myself" in English. 

drive - (CW) "Drive" is a Greek verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

out  -- This is from the prefix that means "out of" or "from"of the previous verb.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

devils,  - "Devils" is a Greek word that means "divinity", "divine power", "a lower divine being," and "evil spirit. "Evil spirit" is a New Testament usage or interpretation. More about Biblical use in this article.) Today, we would use a psychological term for these disorders, like "delusions", or, "personal demons". 

by  - The word translated as "by" primarily means "in", "with," and "into." It means "by" in the sense of "near." It means "in" in the sense of "in the name of" or "by the power of". 

Beelzebub  - Jesus refers to the personalization of evil with the term "Beelzebub"It is not based upon any Greek word. The word "Ba'al Zebub" ("Lord of the Flies" or "Lord of the Flyers") is a Hebrew pun on "Ba'al Zebul" meaning "Lord of the Manor". Christ refers to this pun in Matthew 10:25 using the Greek word "master of the estate" to introduce it. However, in Matthew 12:27, Christ uses this term to refer to the refer to the controller of demons. For more information, see this article.

by   - The word translated as "by" primarily means "in", "with," and "into." It means "by" in the sense of "near." It means "in" in the sense of "in the name of" or "by the power of". 

whom  -- The word translated as "whom" means primarily "anything" or "anyone," but Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

do -- This helping verb is used to create questions, commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

your -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

people -- (WW) The word translated as "people" means "sons" and  more generally means "child" or "children". It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Jesus also used it metaphorically to describe those who follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

cast - "Cast " is a Greek verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

them-- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences. Since "devils" was the object of the previous occurrence of this verb, it can be assumed that it is the object here.

out  -- This is from the prefix that means "out of" or "from"of the previous verb.

So --  (WW)  The word translated as "through" as in movement through, but it also means "by" the sense of "by means of" a given method.

then, - (WW) The word translated as "then" means "this," "from here" or "this/that thing."

they  - (MW) The pronoun "they" is used as the subject to add emphasis to the word, since it is already contain in the verb. It is like we would say "they themselves" in English. 

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

your  - - The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours." Uncommonly, this word is separated by the verb from the word "judges." So the sense may be more "of you."

judges. - -  The word "judges" means "judge" or "interpreter" and it is the noun form of the word meaning "to decide" or "to separate."

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "drive" is usually translated as "cast."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "devils" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "people" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "people" should be "sons" or "children."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "so" should be "through."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "then" should be "this."
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "they themselves"

The Spoken Version: 

The Master continued.
“And if I myself toss out demons in the name of Beelzebub, in the name of what do those sons of yours cast them out?” asked the Nazarene, nodding at two of the younger members of the Distinguished.
This question further confused some of the Distinguished, but the two young Distinguished, and their fathers with them understood.
“Are you talking about our children’s struggles with their own personal demons?” one of the father’s asked.
The Master smiled and nodded. The Distinguished began to murmur among themselves, about their youngest members problems and how the Nazarene had known about them.
“We all prayed for the power of the Divine to deliver them,” the father of the young Distinguished admitted.
“By this, they themselves will be the judges of you,” the Master suggested cheerfully.

Front Page Date: 

Nov 2 2020